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NEW 600W L.V.TRANSFORMER DOES NOT PRODUCE ENOUGH POWER

I HAD AN OLD 600W LOW VOLTAGE TRANSFORMER WHICH STOPPED WORKING AND WAS MADE BY H.B. REPLACED WITH A NEW ONE MADE BY H.B. I EXPECTED THAT IT SHOULD GIVE ME THE SAME POWER OUT BUT IT DOES NOT. IT SEEMS MY ELECTRICIAN DOES NOT KNOW WHAT THE PROBLEM IS. PLEASE ADVISE WHAT YOU THINK THE PROBLEM MIGHT BE. THERE HAS BEEN NO CHANGES IN THE NUMBER OF LIGHTS OR THE WATTAGE OF MY SYSTEM

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This is more than likely what has happened . I am going to guess that your original low voltage trasformer was a 120 volt .6KW. Or 600watt transformer that has one lead from it to the lights . The newer less expensive transformer is also 600 watts , but the new one may have 2 sets of wire terminals on the back( 4 screws ). If this is the case , you have a transformer that is 600 watts output but it has 2 seperate 300 watt outputs that won't run 600 watts from 1 set of output screws . You will have to seperate the lighting load and may have to run an additional low voltage wire to half of your lights . In other words . Put 300 watts of light on 1 set of 12volt output screws and 300 watts on the other se of output screws .that will solve your issue . Good luck and enjoy your lights again . John

Posted on Sep 27, 2012

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There are many things that could be causing this problem, so you will need to check the system over methodically.

1. Check that there is mains power of the correct voltage at the input side of the new transformer. If you do not have any power here you have a fuse/breaker out or supply cable fault. If the power input is o.k then;

2. Check what power if any is coming from the output side of the new transformer . If you have no power output the new transformer is faulty. If power output is ok the fault lies with the onward cabling or switching to the lamps.

If it is only a question of transformer power output refer to H.B as you can have different power ratings at the same voltage. ie 600 volts at 1000 VA or 3000 VA ,you need to make sure you have sufficient output current for the total of your lamps.

I hope this is of some help.

Posted on Dec 01, 2008

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