Question about Canon EOS-5D Digital Camera

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Focus problems. I have a Canon 5D. I find that a lot of my pictures are not pin-sharp. I have adjusted the aperture setting to create less depth of field, and have also increased shutter speed to eliminate the possibility of visible had shake, but still...a lot of soft focused shots. Any suggestions?

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The canon 5d was suspected to produced low sharp pictures, but it's wrong. Sharpness is a parameter on the 5D. You can tune it in the menu/image style/ then you choose your style and hit "jump". The first cursor is sharpeness. Enjoy.

Posted on Feb 05, 2009

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Aperture function


The primary function of the aperture is to control the amount of light passing through the lens. The more light passes through the lens, the less time is required for the proper exposure. A faster exposure can freeze motion and alleviate camera motion, while a longer exposure can allow the subject to blur, conveying a sense of motion.

The aperture also affects the depth of field. A wider aperture narrows the depth of field, causing the foreground and background to blur, while a smaller aperture widens the depth of field, putting more of the scene into focus.

It's up to the photographer to decide which effects to show. Usually for a portrait you'd want the subject's face to be sharp and the background to be blurry. For a landscape, you'd generally want everything from the foreground to the background to be sharp.

May 22, 2012 | Canon PowerShot SX120 IS Digital Camera

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Controlling Depth of Field


A photographed object will only appear sharp in an area a specific distance from the camera. The human eye and brain still accept some areas of the image as acceptably sharp if they lie near the plane of focus and already show a small degree of blur. This zone, which is still in acceptably sharp focus, is called depth of field.

You'd typically want a wide depth of field when shooting landscapes, so as to have everything from the flower in the foreground to the mountains on the horizon in focus. You'd typically want a narrow depth of field for such subjects as portraits and flowers, blurring the background to avoid distractions.

How large this depth of field is depends on the distance to the subject, the aperture, and the focal length of the lens. Whether you're shooting film or digital makes no difference.

If the plane of focus lies further away from the camera, the depth of field is wider than if the camera focuses on an object close by.

Small apertures (large f/numbers) result in a wider depth of field.

Short focal length lenses (wide angle) have a wider depth of field than long focal length lenses (telephoto).

The depth of field is determined by the actual focal length of the lens, not the "35-mm equivalent" often used in the camera specifications. Because most compact cameras have sensors much smaller than SLRs, they have much shorter lenses, giving wider depth of field. This is great for landscapes, not so great for portraits.

To get a narrow depth of field, set the aperture as large as you can (smaller f/numbers), move in close to the subject, and zoom in. If your camera doesn't give you direct control over the aperture, try using the Portrait mode. And yes, the last two items above, moving in close and zooming in, are in opposition, You'll have to decide on the best balance for your picture.

To get a wide depth of field, set the aperture as small as you can (larger f/numbers), move away from the subject, and zoom out. If your camera doesn't give you direct control over the aperture, try using the Landscape mode.

Before going on vacation or shooting your child's wedding, experiment with these factors. Shoot things in your backyard or at a park, trying for both narrow and deep depth of field, then look at the pictures on your computer.

on Jun 23, 2011 | Cameras

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Depth of field is the characteristic of how much of, or how deeply, the...


Depth of field is the characteristic of how much of, or how deeply, the photograph is in focus. If the main subject is in focus but the foreground and background are blurred, the photo is said to have a shallow depth of field. if most of the photo is in focus, including the foreground and background, the photo is said to have a wide depth of field.

Depth of field is controlled by the aperture setting:

- A wide aperture setting (indicated by a low f-stop number) will provide shallow depth of field, resulting in the main subject being in focus and the foreground and background being blurry. This setting is particularly useful when taking portraits or when using a macro lens.

- A narrow aperture setting (indicated by a higher f-stop number) will provide wider depth of field, resulting in the entire photo being in focus. This setting is particularly useful when taking landscape or wide-angle photographs.

The photographs below are examples of how the same subject will photograph using different aperture settings. Note that as the aperture closes, which will allow less light to reach the image sensor, the shutter speed gets faster to produce the appropriate exposure.



shajanrs.jpg

shajanrs_0.jpg

shajanrs_1.jpg

shajanrs_2.jpg

I think you have got a general idea about depth filed. If you have further questions, you can ask me directly. http://www.fixya.com/users/shajanrs






depth of field - what is depth field - how depth field affects picture - how to adjust depth field - DEPTH FIELD - depthfield - DEPTHFIELD

on Jan 08, 2011 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W50 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Unsharp pictures when using the leica macro 90mm 4:0 lens as a telephoto lens


Besides any problems with the focus mechanism which should be fairly obvious, your shutter speed may be too slow. A slow shutter speed can be set manually or caused automatically when using a smaller aperture in lower light settings, the camera compensates by opening up the shutter. Try testing your lens out in bright scenes with the aperture open. Another problem is with manual lenses at low apertures. It can be difficult to manually focus at just the right point because shooting around f.4 with a longer barrel lens leads to a very shallow depth of field. To compensate, try a smaller aperture or take a few photos of a subject while adjusting your focus to get the "money shot." If all the above fails make sure to double check your sensor and lens are clean, a greasy or dirty lens will always lead to less crisp photos.

Feb 26, 2011 | Leica 90mm f/4 Macro-Elmar M Manual Focus...

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I got a Nikon D5000 and 18-55mm lens. When I take pictures using focal between 18-24 mm the deep of field is not sharp especially for landscape pictures. I made at list 200 pictures (the same image) test...


We need to understand Depth of Field first. Depth of field increase in two ways, one with the Aperture setting and one with the distance the lens is focused on. Example, at F22 focused at 10 feet the Depth of Field will be (assume for the example) from 7ft to 20 ft. You need to use the camera in aperture mode, set it to a "Slow" aperture, the larger the number the slower the aperture. Example F2.8 is "fast or Open, F22 is slow or "closed". The problem is not in your lens or camera. To get maximum Depth of fuield you need to shoot in Aperture Mode, set the f-stop to F11 or slower, F16, F22. The use manual focus to focus the lens. Using auto focus is "ok" for many scenes but to get MAX Depth of field you cannot let the camera select the object to focus on. Here is the BEST way to do it. Setup your camera in Aperture mode, set F-stops as suggested above. Focus on the subject that you want and shoot. Dont forget, the camera will be using slow shutter speeds like this so camera shake will create blurr that can be confused with out of focus. Shooting slow at F11 to F22 usually required a good tripod. Also, another thing to know, Field of focus is deeper "behind" the spot you are focusing on than in "Frint" of the point you are focused on. Good luck, Worm1855

Dec 28, 2010 | Nikon D5000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I dont understand the depth of feid button


Depth of field is one of the most useful creative controls on any camera.

It enables you to see how any given aperture setting will affect how much of your photographic scene will be in sharp focus. Aperture settings don't just affect how much light enters the lens, they determine how much of the scene in front of and behind the subject which you've focussed on will also be in focus. The distance between the nearest object in sharp focus and the most distant is called the depth of field.
Wide open apertures (i.e. lowest numbers) give you the shallowest depth of field and vice-versa.

Modern cameras always show the image in the viewfinder or LCD using the lens aperture wide open, regardless of what you've actually set: this allows maximum light into the lens to allow you to clearly see the scene and the lens only close down to the correct aperture at the moment that you press the shutter. The depth of field button (more correctly called the depth of field preview button) enables you to close down the aperture to what it's actually been set to so that you can see exactly what is in sharp focus; when you press it the scene will darken as there will be less light entering the camera, but if you look at a foreground or background subject which is out of focus before you press the button you'll notice that it becomes sharper when you activate the preview. The button will not have any effect at all if you have the lens set to it's maximum (lowest number) aperture, as the aperture that you're viewing the scene at is identical to the one you're taking the photo at.

Understanding depth of field and how you can manipulate it is vital to taking stunning photos:-

Say you want to take a photo of a bee on a flower: if you leave the camera set to auto, or select a medium to small aperture then the photo will show the bee, the flower, and everything in front and behind making a confusing and busy shot. If you select a wide open aperture then the bee will be in sharp focus (if you're really close, maybe only it's head), the flower, or parts of it will be in sharp focus, and the foreground and background will blur out making the bee and the flower the most important compositional elements in your shot.

Alternatively, you may be in a situation where you need to lift your camera quickly and take a shot without disturbing the subject. You don't know exactly how far away your subject will be, but you know it will be between, say, five feet and twenty feet. If you use your camera as normal, you'll see the shot, lift the camera to your eye, wait for focus (if using an autofocus camera, it might not even focus on what you intend). By the time the shutter has activated the moment has passed or the subject has seen or heard you and gone. Using depth of field you can manually prefocus to a point about a third of the way into your d.o.f. (in this case, ten feet) and select the correct aperture to give you a fifteen foot d.o.f. The setting varies with the lens, but you'll almost always get away with f8). When you see the right shot you just lift the camera and fire without worrying about focus and if you've done so correctly your subject will be sharply focussed. Of course, you could set the lens to minimum aperture, but this can result in the shutter speed being too low for the light conditions and causing unsharpness due to movement of the subject or your camera.

The technique is known as hyperfocal focussing and it explains why some lenses have various markings on them in various colours with aperture numbers next to them, they're a simple depth of field calculator for any given aperture setting. I'd provide a link but it's better if you search yourself as some sites go into what may be far too much detail about the subject.

Hope this has helped you, all that I ask in return is that you take a moment to rate my answer. If there's anything which you want me to clarify further then add a comment to my answer and I'll return as soon as I can to assist you some more.

Jan 30, 2010 | Nikon N80 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Set up for canon 30D EOS for intraoral pictures, to ger everything in focus.


still not sure what introral is???...but your depth of field.... ( how much of image is in focus)..is dependent on aperture setting ..the higher the number..(smaller the aperture) the more of the image will be in focus at once (front to back).... so set camera to Tv setting for aperture priority..set that number to f8 or above... f11- f16 f22 preferably and shoot away knowing you will get things in focus from close to far away

Nov 24, 2008 | Canon Cameras

1 Answer

Canon 400d constant backfocus


Backfocus problems will be magnified when using wide aperture lens with shallow depth of field, nice lens btw. Camera's adjustments for manual and autofocus are inside mirror cage behind mirror, and you dont want to risk getting dust on sensor or damaging sensor. Qualified camera repair shop or sending to canon for adjustment would be my suggestion.

Feb 27, 2008 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

1 Answer

S4 No Multiple Focus?


Acceptable focus depends on many things and an appreciation of aperture, lens, distance and shutterspeed is needed before understanding the finer points of 'depth of field' (what will and wont be in focus). Like all cameras, an auto focus camera cannot make everything sharp, it has to focus on one thing, usually in the middle, and the rest of the picture either falls in or out of focus, depending on the combination of the above points. For example, if you shoot on a wide-angle lens with a small aperture, say anything above f8, you should have everything you want in focus. In contrast, on a longer telephoto lens with a wide aperture (more light being allowed to hit the film or chip or whatever) the resulting picture will be sharp within only a few inches of the focus point. This can be really nice if you are shooting single portraits in bright light as the background will become extremely blurry and colourful. I am presuming that the shots you are concerned with had the camera settings set to wide aperture priority, possibly because it was dull or you had a 'sport mode' selected where fast shutterspeed is needed to catch rapid movement thus a wide aperture is needed to compensate and so shallow depth of field results. I don't know the camera you are using or whether you will understand any of the above. If you need a greater explanation of what is essentially a science, please let me know.

Sep 08, 2005 | Pentax Optio S4 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Landscape picture


You don't normally want to focus on infinity for landscape shots. Auto focus on mid distance between you and infinity [horizon or most distant object] while half holding down shutter button re compose your pic and shoot. Depth of field will help to ensure that everything is in focus larger F stop more depth of field. f2.8 minimum depth of field. This is digital, film is cheap :-) Using the same focus spot, take one shot at each aperture and decide which aperture gives the desired results in terms of sharpness, I think you will find that will be around f4. Then try different focusing spot [closer or further away] to adjust how much between you and infinity is in focus depending on the results YOU wish to achieve.

Sep 06, 2005 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ2 Digital Camera

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