Question about Cameras

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I have a Canon 5D. I find that a lot of my pictures are not pin-sharp. I have adjusted the aperture setting to create less depth of field, and have also increased shutter speed to eliminate the possibility of visible had shake, but still...a lot of soft focus shots. Any suggestions?

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  • floysht Nov 03, 2008

    Thanks Kakee, but the problem remains. I tried using the auto focus feature as well on the EF 24-70mm 2.8 L lens, but the images are still not sharp.

  • floysht Nov 03, 2008

    Thanks, but I had already done that prior to the initial posting. Could it be a problem with the lens?

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The optics are a critical element of the camera function. A lens swap may show a difference. I'll bet not as there are so many variables dependent on a mechanical and electronic elements of the camera itself, that this is more likely where fault will lay.

I wouldn't' hesitate to return your camera to Canon. Not after what you probably paid for it.

Take this camera to a professional camera store. Canon is a highly prized camera. A professional store will verify you're problem and assist in getting you camera serviced or replaced under warranty.

Regards,
Worldvet

Posted on Nov 03, 2008

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Try to upload your pictures on your computer and see the difference. if on your camera the pictures is not that good and when you upload it to your computer gives a big difference(like fair on the camera but good quality on the computer) then stick with it but if still the same from the camera and computer then your lens got the problem. if this happen send it to repair service to change lens. if this will cost you a lot for repairing then buy a new one.

thank you for using fixya
CHARCOIS

Posted on Nov 03, 2008

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Dear,
you might try using the center focus point only, it might be more accurate

regards,

dont rate it if want further info..untill satisfied

Posted on Nov 03, 2008

  • SALMAN NASEER Nov 03, 2008

    dear,

    if problem persists then,
    use the back button instead of the shutter button to avoid back-focus.. as if you use the shutter button to focus after you focus and then recompose the shot there is a chance that the camera might refocus causing back focus as the point you were using might not be on the subject

    regards,

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If you shot on a steady image and you still ahve a blury images, it could be the camera lens has the problem.

it is better to bring it into authorized tech, just to avoid further damaged on the unit.

Posted on Nov 03, 2008

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1 - Get out of "AUTO" as it will really hinder the image quality
2 - Start on the "P" mode setting and learn from there
3 - Go into the menu and set the picture quality to SuperFine (or highest available)
4 - Use ISO100 at all times if there is enough light, otherwise use ISO 200 (I wouldn't move to ISO 400 until I really needed to)
5 - Make sure your IS setting is set to "shot only" if that setting is available (this may help image quality)
6 - Make sure you are setting the White Balance to match the surroundings (sunny, cloudy, tungsten, etc.)
7 - Go into the color setting are (where you can set BW / SEPIA / etc.) and go to "CUSTOM" and crank up the contrast, hue, saturation settings.

The biggest thing is I think your quality setting is low... do the above and see what happens. Most of all, stay off "AUTO" if you can, the "P" is where I shoot most of the time!

Posted on Nov 03, 2008

  • Indrajit Roy
    Indrajit Roy Nov 03, 2008

    If you have tried the steps, try and clean the lens with a soft cloth. Its time to get the lens checked. Take your computer to some camera shop for repair or adjustment.



    Thanks

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Your eyes are trained and are sensitive to photo details.

Trying another lens for comparison using the same settings is your best option. After all, the lens is the most important part (costs more than the camera itself).

Posted on Nov 03, 2008

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Please set your settings to default.
instructions are given in your service manual or users manual.

Posted on Nov 03, 2008

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Try to use the default settings again, like reset it back to factory defaults. You can see it on the Menu. Now if the settings are defaulted. Try to adjust only the shutter speed.

Posted on Nov 03, 2008

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Aperture function


The primary function of the aperture is to control the amount of light passing through the lens. The more light passes through the lens, the less time is required for the proper exposure. A faster exposure can freeze motion and alleviate camera motion, while a longer exposure can allow the subject to blur, conveying a sense of motion.

The aperture also affects the depth of field. A wider aperture narrows the depth of field, causing the foreground and background to blur, while a smaller aperture widens the depth of field, putting more of the scene into focus.

It's up to the photographer to decide which effects to show. Usually for a portrait you'd want the subject's face to be sharp and the background to be blurry. For a landscape, you'd generally want everything from the foreground to the background to be sharp.

May 22, 2012 | Canon PowerShot SX120 IS Digital Camera

Tip

Controlling Depth of Field


A photographed object will only appear sharp in an area a specific distance from the camera. The human eye and brain still accept some areas of the image as acceptably sharp if they lie near the plane of focus and already show a small degree of blur. This zone, which is still in acceptably sharp focus, is called depth of field.

You'd typically want a wide depth of field when shooting landscapes, so as to have everything from the flower in the foreground to the mountains on the horizon in focus. You'd typically want a narrow depth of field for such subjects as portraits and flowers, blurring the background to avoid distractions.

How large this depth of field is depends on the distance to the subject, the aperture, and the focal length of the lens. Whether you're shooting film or digital makes no difference.

If the plane of focus lies further away from the camera, the depth of field is wider than if the camera focuses on an object close by.

Small apertures (large f/numbers) result in a wider depth of field.

Short focal length lenses (wide angle) have a wider depth of field than long focal length lenses (telephoto).

The depth of field is determined by the actual focal length of the lens, not the "35-mm equivalent" often used in the camera specifications. Because most compact cameras have sensors much smaller than SLRs, they have much shorter lenses, giving wider depth of field. This is great for landscapes, not so great for portraits.

To get a narrow depth of field, set the aperture as large as you can (smaller f/numbers), move in close to the subject, and zoom in. If your camera doesn't give you direct control over the aperture, try using the Portrait mode. And yes, the last two items above, moving in close and zooming in, are in opposition, You'll have to decide on the best balance for your picture.

To get a wide depth of field, set the aperture as small as you can (larger f/numbers), move away from the subject, and zoom out. If your camera doesn't give you direct control over the aperture, try using the Landscape mode.

Before going on vacation or shooting your child's wedding, experiment with these factors. Shoot things in your backyard or at a park, trying for both narrow and deep depth of field, then look at the pictures on your computer.

on Jun 23, 2011 | Cameras

Tip

Depth of field is the characteristic of how much of, or how deeply, the...


Depth of field is the characteristic of how much of, or how deeply, the photograph is in focus. If the main subject is in focus but the foreground and background are blurred, the photo is said to have a shallow depth of field. if most of the photo is in focus, including the foreground and background, the photo is said to have a wide depth of field.

Depth of field is controlled by the aperture setting:

- A wide aperture setting (indicated by a low f-stop number) will provide shallow depth of field, resulting in the main subject being in focus and the foreground and background being blurry. This setting is particularly useful when taking portraits or when using a macro lens.

- A narrow aperture setting (indicated by a higher f-stop number) will provide wider depth of field, resulting in the entire photo being in focus. This setting is particularly useful when taking landscape or wide-angle photographs.

The photographs below are examples of how the same subject will photograph using different aperture settings. Note that as the aperture closes, which will allow less light to reach the image sensor, the shutter speed gets faster to produce the appropriate exposure.



shajanrs.jpg

shajanrs_0.jpg

shajanrs_1.jpg

shajanrs_2.jpg

I think you have got a general idea about depth filed. If you have further questions, you can ask me directly. http://www.fixya.com/users/shajanrs






depth of field - what is depth field - how depth field affects picture - how to adjust depth field - DEPTH FIELD - depthfield - DEPTHFIELD

on Jan 08, 2011 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W50 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I got a Nikon D5000 and 18-55mm lens. When I take pictures using focal between 18-24 mm the deep of field is not sharp especially for landscape pictures. I made at list 200 pictures (the same image) test...


We need to understand Depth of Field first. Depth of field increase in two ways, one with the Aperture setting and one with the distance the lens is focused on. Example, at F22 focused at 10 feet the Depth of Field will be (assume for the example) from 7ft to 20 ft. You need to use the camera in aperture mode, set it to a "Slow" aperture, the larger the number the slower the aperture. Example F2.8 is "fast or Open, F22 is slow or "closed". The problem is not in your lens or camera. To get maximum Depth of fuield you need to shoot in Aperture Mode, set the f-stop to F11 or slower, F16, F22. The use manual focus to focus the lens. Using auto focus is "ok" for many scenes but to get MAX Depth of field you cannot let the camera select the object to focus on. Here is the BEST way to do it. Setup your camera in Aperture mode, set F-stops as suggested above. Focus on the subject that you want and shoot. Dont forget, the camera will be using slow shutter speeds like this so camera shake will create blurr that can be confused with out of focus. Shooting slow at F11 to F22 usually required a good tripod. Also, another thing to know, Field of focus is deeper "behind" the spot you are focusing on than in "Frint" of the point you are focused on. Good luck, Worm1855

Dec 28, 2010 | Nikon D5000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I do a lot of presentatins an my camera is always letting me dow. The problem is the flash doesn't always work. I put the camera on the 'P' setting. I was given the camera for a Christmas Prtesent and...


"P" is Program mode. The flash won't pop up in this mode unless you tell it to with the manual flash button.
You might be better off starting in Av (Aperture Priority) mode and choosing the depth of field you want via the aperture setting.
The camera will then pick the shutter timing according to the available light.

Choose a smaller number (=larger aperture) for less depth-of field, meaning the background will appear more blurred.

Choose a larger number (=smaller aperture) for more depth-of-field meaning the background will be more in focus.

Feb 10, 2009 | Cameras

Tip

How does aperture setting affect a photograph?


The aperture is the opening in the lens through which light passes to the image sensor. Changing the aperture setting allows you to control the depth of field of a photograph. When the aperture is opened to a widersetting, (indicated by a lower f-stop number) more light is passed to the imagesensor, creating more shallow depth of field. Closing the aperture (indicatedby a higher f-stop number) allows less light to pass to the image sensor,creating wider depth of field.

NOTE: The aperture setting is one of three primary settings usedto control the overall exposure of a photograph. The other two primary settingsare ISO and shutter speed. Because the three settings work together to produce the overall exposure for a photograph, changingthe aperture setting will require complimentary changes to either the ISO or shutter speed to produce a properly exposed photograph. These changes will bemade automatically by the camera in the Auto, Program, Aperture-priority andShutter-priority modes.

There are two ways tocontrol the aperture setting on the camera:
  • Aperture-priority mode (A) - When shooting in Aperture priority mode (A), you set the aperture value and the camera automatically sets the optimum shutter speed for you.
  • Manual mode (M) - When shooting in Manual mode (M), you control both aperture and shutter speed, which gives you maximum creative control to achieve the exact results you want.

on Jan 08, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

Focus problems.


The canon 5d was suspected to produced low sharp pictures, but it's wrong. Sharpness is a parameter on the 5D. You can tune it in the menu/image style/ then you choose your style and hit "jump". The first cursor is sharpeness. Enjoy.

Nov 03, 2008 | Canon EOS-5D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Aperture


Hello,

On digital cameras you set the camera to Aperture priority and then use your spin dial to set the lowest aperture possible and let the camera set the shutter speed.

In basic terms, the lower the aperture number the shorter depth of the vision field that will be in focus. This is called Depth of Field.

If your camera doesn't have an Aperture priority, usually a capital A on the program dial, you are a bit out of luck... that said, almost all cameras today have this feature. Yours may also be accessed by setting the program dial to Closeup or Portrait mode where the camera will use a short Depth of Field to blur out the background.

Hope that helped of fixed your dilemma.
Worldvet

May 21, 2008 | Casio Exilim EXZ75 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Canon 400d constant backfocus


Backfocus problems will be magnified when using wide aperture lens with shallow depth of field, nice lens btw. Camera's adjustments for manual and autofocus are inside mirror cage behind mirror, and you dont want to risk getting dust on sensor or damaging sensor. Qualified camera repair shop or sending to canon for adjustment would be my suggestion.

Feb 27, 2008 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

1 Answer

Landscape picture


You don't normally want to focus on infinity for landscape shots. Auto focus on mid distance between you and infinity [horizon or most distant object] while half holding down shutter button re compose your pic and shoot. Depth of field will help to ensure that everything is in focus larger F stop more depth of field. f2.8 minimum depth of field. This is digital, film is cheap :-) Using the same focus spot, take one shot at each aperture and decide which aperture gives the desired results in terms of sharpness, I think you will find that will be around f4. Then try different focusing spot [closer or further away] to adjust how much between you and infinity is in focus depending on the results YOU wish to achieve.

Sep 06, 2005 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ2 Digital Camera

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