Question about Asrock 775VM800 Motherboard

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Power supply I have just swapped computer cases and can not find the correct format to put the 8 pin connectors bak can you help many thanks paul

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Posted on Jan 16, 2009

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Swapped power supply and not sure if i connected everything


This guide shows a lot of the possibilities for any PC.
http://www.fonerbooks.com/r_power.htm
Basically there are only three important connections: The main ATX connector - usually 24 pin, plugs into motherboard at the edge near the memory slots [it's a 24 pin on your m/b]; the CPU power - plugs into the motherboard, 4 pin (square) [your m/b has the square 4-pin type, I think it's near the 'M' of the MS-7623 label], or 8 pin (4 x 2) on newer computers - and the hard drive power, usually a flattish 15-way connector (SATA) [your computer also has IDE capability, four in line pin connectors]. Your graphics card if present may need external power from your PSU, but seeing as you're not sure you've connected everything up, I'm assuming you don't have a graphics card.
The connectors are keyed so you can't put them in the wrong way round; do not force them, but they may be a bit stiff.
It would help if you told us the model of your PSU.
Be certain that the voltage input selector, if present, on the back (outside) of your PSU is set to the correct voltage.
(details of your m/b are given here
http://www.msi.com/product/mb/880GME41.html#?div=Detail)

23.April.2014

Apr 23, 2014 | MSI 880GM-E41 Desktop Motherboard - AMD...

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New GA-990AX-UD3 motherboard will not boot


You really should take that Power Supply, and use it on grandma's computer.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable was brought out, to provide more power To the motherboard AND processor.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

The 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable has TWO yellow wires.
Yellow wires are 12 Volt wires. (And two Black ground wires)

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable has FOUR 12 Volt wires.

In the motherboard manual, does it say, "Yes Tom. Go ahead and use a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable. We don't care. We just use an 8-pin EPS for fun."

[ This is an 8-pin PCI Express power cable. Completely different,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8 ]

The motherboard probably uses 150 Watts by itself.
No Ram Memory, no CPU, no fans, etc.

The CPU could use up to 125 Watts of power. Just depends on what AMD, socket AM3, processor you are using.

Now to graphics card's power;
The most Wattage a PCI-Express x16 slot can deliver is 75 Watts.

The most power a 6-pin PCI Express power cable can deliver is 75 Watts.
8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable? 150 Watts.

When buying a Power Supply you should calculate all components needing power,

http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

,then buy a Power Supply that has AT LEAST 10 percent more power than needed. Easier on the Power Supply.
Also a computer will NOT use more power than it needs.

10,000 Watt power supply, (Exaggeration ), and the computer only needs about 100 Watts for surfing the internet?

Computer ONLY uses 100 Watts.

Due to the price, the above, and the availability, you should use a 500 Watt power supply at least.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=899123&CatId=1079

http://www.amazon.com/StarTech-6in-Pin-Power-Adapter/dp/B002O21XHQ

Or use it on yours if it has enough Wattage.

Back in the day, the motherboard didn't need to supply that much power to components on it.
More powerful Processors, Ram Memory, and graphics cards, brought the power needed, up.

A 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable was added for the motherboard. Then 6-pin PCI Express power cable for graphics cards. Then the 8-pin PCI Express power cable for graphics cards. Lastly the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

(Better make sure the Power Supply you have is good, if you wish to use the above power adapter cable. Nothing like having a Power Supply with a weak voltage power rail, and a new build, to pull your hair out on )

http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=3894#ov


Out of the motherboard manual Page 23,

"With the use of the power connector, the power supply can supply enough stable power to all the components on the motherboard. Before connecting the power connector, first make sure the power supply is turned off and all devices are properly installed. The power connector possesses a foolproof design.

Connect the power supply cable to the power connector in the correct orientation. The 12V power connector mainly supplies power to the CPU. If the 12V power connector is not connected, the computer will not start.

To meet expansion requirements, it is recommended that a power supply that can withstand high power consumption be used (500W or greater). If a power supply is used that does not provide the required power, the result can lead to an unstable or unbootable system."

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Oct 25, 2012 | Gigabyte Technology GA-990FXA-UD3-...

2 Answers

My motherboard takes this: 1 x 8-pin ATX 12V power connector My PSU (power supply) only has the 4-pin 12V power connector. Can someone please point me to a product that will convert the 4-pin to an...


Hi Andrew.
Just had a look arouund on Amazon, and if you do a search for

EPS 8-Pin Power to ATX 4-Pin Cable

There are a couple that turn up.

Hope this helps.

Apr 16, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I need to build a psu for my sony vaio vgc m1 (18 pin motherboard connector) any1 know how to do this? or if any1 has a spare thanks


Make a Switching Mode Power Supply? (SMPS)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

Ummm, no.

Have it repaired by a competent tech would be one solution. Pretty hard to find, as most are just glorified parts changers.

Information to pass on to the tech:

I've been searching the internet, and it seems a the R20 resistor on the circuit board, (Don't know if it's on the input base plate, or the stabilization base plate), is one component that fails.
It is a .22 Ohm resistor.
(That's point 22 Ohm, not 22 Ohm)
A competent tech will know what voltage range, and tolerance range, to use for a replacement.

The second component that seems to fail is one, or all four, of the power MOS-FET's.

(IF I understand correctly, the 07N60C3 MOS-FET's, are Infineon SPP0760C3 unit's.
Again IF I understand correctly, the Hitachi 2SK3234 may be a replacement)

The power supply used was made by Delta Electronics. It was made in Japan. The model number is DPS-197AB.
Sony's Part Number is 1-468-878-11.

The pinout of the 18-pin ATX main power cable connector, (CN1), according to my sources is;

Pin 1 - Orange - +3.3 Volts
Pin 2 - Orange - +3.3 Volts
Pin 3 - Red - +5 Volts
Pin 4 - Blue - Power Signal
Pin 5 - Green - PS-ON (With ground power source on)
Pin 6 - White - Fan -(Motherboard fan)
Pin 7 - Pink - + of Mfan (Case fan. same/same)
Pin 8 - Yellow - +12 Volts
Pin 9 - Yellow - +12 Volts
Pin 10 - Black - Ground
Pin 11 - Black - GRD
Pin 12 - Black - GRD
Pin 13 - Black - GRD
Pin 14 - Purple - +5 VSB (+5 Volt Standby. The usual 5 Volts)
Pin 15 - Gray - Power Good
Pin 16 - Black - GRD
Pin 17 - Black - GRD
Pin 18 - Yellow - +12 Volts

The PSU (Power Supply Unit) case, indicates 197.7 Watts is the maximum rated amount.

1) The 3.3 Volt power rail can handle 8 Amps (26.4 Watts)
2) The 5 Volt power rail can handle 7 Amps (35 Watts)
3) The 12 Volt power rail can handle 14 Amps (168 Watts)

Total is more like 229.4 Watts.
(Of course this power supply, probably only has a maximum sustained efficiency of 80 percent)

To you:
Fact:
A computer only uses the power it needs, and NO more. If there was a way to hook up a 1000 Watt power supply, it wouldn't hurt the computer.

IMHO, a tech will not be able to substitute the circuit board, and components, out of another power supply, and be able to fit it in the power supply case, that fits in the Sony Vaio VGC M1 All-In-One computer.

The size, and shape of the metal casing, is a Proprietary item for the Vaio VGC M1, as well as the 18-pin ATX main power cable connector.
(As you are already aware about the 18-pin connector pinout)

(Proprietary meaning made for THAT computer)

This would mean using an external power supply. Something that a professional tech is not going to approach.
Liability issues dealing with safety.

IMHO though it is a feasible approach, IF, the power supply has a metal case cover of solid design, that allows a space between it, and the replacement power supply's case.

Power supply's cases have ventilation holes in them.
What do you suppose would happen if a toddler, inserted a metal rod down into one of those ventilation holes?
Bad shock to Fatal!
Also if water were accidentally spilled on the power supply.

There would have to be a metal casing that allows an air space between it, and the replacement power supply's case, so the replacement power supply would have adequate ventilation. Would also be a safety guard.

I have also searched online, and I also concur that the Delta DPS-197AB power supply, is as rare as hen's teeth.
(Chicken hens do not have teeth)

I did see where someone on Ebay UK had one for sale, but the listing is over.
I saw a Japanese auction website that had one also, but it's listing was over.

I also saw where a person on a forum had two for sale. (Long over with)
Indication was a bad power supply, but the final diagnosis revealed the motherboard was bad.
(Food for thought)

{I also saw where a motherboard was offered on Ebay}

To conclude:
MAYBE, there is a tech that will outfit an external power supply.
Not a very aesthetic approach, but a viable one. (IMHO)
The tech will remove the 18-pin connector from the power wires of the original power supply, and insert the power wires of the replacement power supply into the 18-pin ATX main power cable connector.

Or perhaps an individual will again offer the power supply

NOTE*

DO NOT open the power supply yourself!!
There are Electrolytic Capacitors used in the power supply. (Input Stage, and Output Stage. They are used as Filters)

An Electrolytic Capacitor slowly builds up a charge, then releases it, All At Once.
They can hold a charge, once removed from power, for weeks, months, and sometimes over a year.

IF, your finger's touch the terminals on the bottom of an Electrolytic Capacitor, the charge can be released to you!

IF, your finger's touch, and complete a circuit that one, or more capacitors are in, the charge can be released to you!

Bad shock to FATAL!

There is a proper way to discharge a capacitor.
I will not list it.

Repair is for a qualified, competent repair tech.

[ http://tokyoswan.web.fc2.com/4htm/delta/delta.htm

The above link, is to show you some of the Electrolytic Capacitors used inside a Delta DPS-197AB power supply.
The link is not translated on purpose.

Scroll down to the 3rd, and 4th photo. That large Black object that looks like a Can, and has - 4742AW on it, is an Electrolytic Capacitor.

This one has enough power stored to put X's in your eyes]

Jun 05, 2010 | Sony VAIO M1 (VGCM1) PC Desktop

2 Answers

Apple xserve g5 power supply got porblem. may need to replacement


this is the link to get a service manual in English. www.scribd.com/doc/103410/xserve
It includes detailed instructions, like use static electricity wrist bands.
1. Shut down the computer. Remove the power cable. 2. Unscrew the two finger screws on the front panel, remove the computer from it's case by pulling forward, and place it on a solid surface. Be careful. It's heavy and hard to handle. DON'T DROP IT. 3. Unscrew the one finger screw holding the Power Supply in place. Lift the power supply out by the metal support near the 14 pin connector to the motherboard. There is a pin in the back panel of the computer, so the back end of the power supply rotates when the end closest to the front lifts. 4. The 14 pin connector is has a lot of friction. I have never gotten it to come up easily, as it is supposed to. I usually use something to GENTLY lift up the metal cover/bracket over the 14 pin connector on the front end. 5. If you are taking this out because you are replacing it, you should read what the manual says about checking the battery, resetting the PMU [AKA "zapping the PRAM"?], and checking for 12 volts of power from pin 1 to pin 8 on the 14 pin connector. 6. This isn't in the manual: To get at the 1 and 8 pins on the 14 pin connector, A. Removed the power supply, as described above. B. Removed the three screws that hold the metal cover/bracket over the 14 pin connector on the front end. C. Removed the cover/bracket to expose the tops of the 14 pins.

Apr 01, 2010 | Apple Xserve G5 Server

2 Answers

How do I plug the Power Button wire into the motherboard?


Printed on the MB
HD LED +1 -3
PWR LED +2 -4
RESET 5- 7+ (Why the changed order? & there's no reset button on this computer.)
PWR ON +6 -8

There are nine pins with a little triangle pointing at one and a 2 next to another.
The pins on the MB look like this:

2ndpin
. . . .
. . . . .
1st pin


Found some info on the 506GR. Unfortunately Gateway is keeping the service manual a big secret.

This will help. Thanks please keep updated. please do rate the solution positively .Thank you for using Fixya

Regards
manish

Mar 24, 2010 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Hi the front fan connection has come off on my asus p5vd2-x motherboard and I'm not sure if it should be connected to the cha fan connector or the pwr fan connector? and both those sockets on my...


According to the manual your Motherboard supports two case fans. You can use either of these pins setups. For your motherboard you have three pins with the third pin ( CLOSEST TO THE CPU) controlling the rotation of the fan. For your two pin fan put the black ( ground ) wire of the two wires on the pin FARTHEST from the CPU.
Note: Manual says the fans should be a max of 350 Ma.

For more information see your manual or look here for a on-line manual.

http://www.manualnguide.com/dl/9354/

Good Luck

Jan 07, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

My motherboard can't turn on and me had changed power supply with new one.Can you help me how to check power on motherboard.Thank you. I bought a new case for my ATX motherboard. I installed the power...


the chances are that the power supply is not enough for the motherboard. or the main power connector has only 20 pins. the newer version of motherboards requier 24 pin power connector.

Mar 24, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Swapped mother board


Hi Paul,
see page 8 number 15 for location. Than see page 19, System Panel Header in your manual.
The basic wire color's for positive are red, blue, green & can also be light blue, light green, light red.
Negative wires are usually white or black. Case wire colors do vary from case to case.
To see pin one shown on page 19, (positive + for hard drive led = HDLED+). Bottom row farthest pin to the left of set. Pin two is above pin one. Pin two is, PLED+ (known as power led). Pin 3 is to the right of pin one & is HDLED- (Hard drive led, negative). Pin 4 is above pin 3 & is also PLED-, (Negative for power led). ECT!
6781222.jpg If your new case has an internal speaker (Used for P.O.S.T, power on self test). This would connect to, Chassis Speaker Header located on page 8, number 16. Again, normally only two wires are used across the 4-pin connector. (One at each end of the connector).

To see ASRock's main site for the 775VM800 motherboard click this link:
http://www.asrock.com/mb/overview.asp?Model=775VM800&s=

Good luck Paul!
Run into a snag, just post the issue here.

Mike

Nov 02, 2008 | Asrock 775VM800 Motherboard

1 Answer

HELP..!!!


Wouldn't like to try but the cables are the same and using the connectors in the correct formation you should be able to but risky.

Thanks J

Jan 30, 2008 | IBM Netfinity 400W H/S Redundant Power...

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