Question about Celestron CG-5 Mount Telescope

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Can't release RA axis manually

When I loosen the RA lock, I can't rotate the RA axis. It seems fully engaged with the motor drive and won't budge. The motor drive seems to work normally and will rotate the RA axis.

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I had one come in like this. AS you say the RA axis should be free to rotate in the RA housing when the clutch lever is released. The cylinder that the worm is machined on is binding on the axle. This doesn't overly effect normal tracking, but makes gross adjustments impossible. The only solution is to tear the mount down and finish the parts to eliminate the interference. Google astronomyboy for the how to. I have to warn you that I had to heat the cylinder and axle in the oven at 250 for 30 minutes before they would separate. don't use the wife's good oven mits!! When I finish these parts I use Soft Scrub (w/o bleach) as a grinding compound. It's basically bicarb in a jell. HTH, Geo.

Posted on Jan 07, 2009

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1 Answer

Won't turn


There is a separate RA motor and a clutch to turn the scope in synch with earths rotation. Have you turned the lever to engage the clutch ? If not there may be a mechanical problem requiring disassembly to diagnose

Apr 02, 2014 | Meade 60AZ-T Telescope

Tip

You Just Bought an EQUATORIAL Telescope Mount!


Even though we warned you not to do this, you bought one anyway! Beginners should never buy an EQ telescope mount as their first telescope. It's too late now; so I guess we will need to teach you how to use it!

Equatorial mounts move in a way that seems not to very intuitive. Unlike the easy Alt AZ mount which moves up and down and left and right, the EQ mounted telescope seems to move in TWO dissimilar directions at the same time.

Additionally you must first polar align the mount on the North star Polaris before you can use it. SEE! we told you not to buy it!

Here are the steps to roughly polar align the telescope so you can use it. If it is motorized the single Right Ascension motor will keep the sky object inside the eyepiece for long periods of time. If you do not have a Right Ascension motor, the slow motion RA knob can be slowly turned to keep the sky object centered in the eyepiece.

Begin by leveling the mount and tripod. Move the entire mount and tripod so it is pointing roughly to North, as close as possible using the steps below or a compass. Don't forget to adjust for your magnetic deviation. My location's compass reading is about 5 degrees away from true North. This is called magnetic deviation. You can find your location's deviation on the internet. Then proceed with the steps below.

First, adjust the Declination to the latitude for your observing site. Declination is the angle that the scope is pointing UP, and it's the same as your latitude. For example Dallas, Texas is about 32 degrees North latitude, adjust the scope so the small indicator reads 32 degrees. By the way, the North star in Dallas, TX is about 32 degrees above the horizon. Your latitude matches the elevation of Polaris (the North star) above the horizon.

Second, either look through the polar alignment scope buried in the axis of the telescope mount, or look along side the axis, and get the star Polaris lined up in the cross-hair of the polar alignment scope, or as best you can by looking along the side of the mount axis, or lining it up using your compass.. This will put the scope to within about 3/4 of 1 degree of the TRUE North celestial sphere. This is good enough for VISUAL observation, but NOT good enough to do astro-photography..

Adjust the DECLINATION up or down, and move the entire mount left or right until you can see Polaris as indicated above, or it is lined up as close as possible.

Now you are roughly polar aligned. Now you can move the tube around by loosening the Right Ascension lock, and or the Declination lock until your sky object appears in the small finder scope mounted on top of the main telescope tube.(DO NOT MOVE THE MOUNT, and the counter weight should never be higher than the telescope tube) Lock down the scope in both axis and use the fine adjustment RA and DEC knobs to center the target. Again, DO NOT move the mount or tripod. The mount should still be pointing at Polaris.

This web site illustrates this procedure:
http://www.astronomy.net/articles/4/polaralign.html

also this web site

http://www.telescopes.com/telescopes/polaralignmentarticle.cfm

You should be able to keep an object within the field of view of the eyepiece by slowing turning the Right Ascension slow motion control knob-------- IF you are actually accurately polar aligned. Small adjustments may also be needed with the DEC slow motion knob since you are not exactly polar aligned using this rough alignment technique.

However it can be used successfully for visual observation. Your scope will now track the motion of the stars as they move across the sky.

Hope that helps you!

Clear Skies!
TelescopeMan

www.telescopeman.tumblr.com

on Dec 29, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

Manual for TwinStar 1000mm focal length telescope and equatorial mount


Equatorial mounts need to be polar aligned to work correctly. Once the scope is polar aligned (see manual or look online for polar alignment instructions), turn on the RA motor. Loosen your RA and DEC locks and find a object you want to view, The motor should keep the object in view for a while (depends on how good the motor tracks and how good your polar alignment is.) Spending 10 minutes polar alignment on my C8 keeps the object in view for about an hour without adjustment.

Dec 16, 2011 | Celestron Optics

1 Answer

Hi Joe, My name is also Joe and I just bought a Celestron AstroMaster 114 and need a hand with the elevation,inclination, declination settings(what should my gauges be set to) to star using the unit. Any...


Your DEC is the same as your Latitude--

Right Ascension does not matter for now. Polar Align the scope on the star Polaris-- read this:

http://arnholm.org/astro/polar_alignment/index.html

Once you are polar aligned, rotate the tube to a star in the sky that you KNOW the name of. Look up the Right Ascension of that star on a cell phone app or a laptop planetarium program like this one:
www.stellarium.org

Rotate the RA setting circle so it matches what the phone or laptop indicate. LOCK down the RA circle. Your scope is now adjusted to the sky and you can use the numbers on the DEC and RA to find other objects of known RA & DEC.


www.telescopeman.org
www.telescopeman.us
www.telescopeman.info

Sep 02, 2011 | Celestron AstroMaster 114 AZ (50 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

I have a problem whith the RA axis. It runs 1/3 of


Don't think you will find a manual anywhere on the internet.

Try using Google but I don't think any exist.

A grinding noise indicates the gears are broken or not engaging properly. Sorry.

Oct 14, 2009 | Takahashi FSQ-106/EM-200 (229 x 106mm)...

1 Answer

Azimuth motor stalling missing the electronic home sensor


Check for binding in the gears; my 10" had aluminium chips in the fork base that jammed the gear. Cured by removing the RA manual adjust assembly - was useless anyway, as it could only be used with the RA unlocked. One setscrew in the fork base holds it in place,just loosen and pull up.

Apr 16, 2009 | Meade LX200GPS Telescope

1 Answer

Ra ascenntion lock release does not release


Contact Orion customer service:

http://www.telescope.com/control/main/

Oct 23, 2008 | Orion SkyView Pro 100mm ED EQ Apo...

1 Answer

GOTO ERRORS MEADE LX200 10" CLASSIC


Most problems tend to be mechanical. Have you 'trained' the drive and set the backlash values? Those 2 can have dramatic effects on pointing accuracy. Also, if the optical tube is not in alignment with the mount, then nothing will work correctly. To check that, have the telescope in Alt-Az configuration, inside the house, loosen the RA lock, and shine a laser pointer on the corrector plate. as the telescope is rotated about the RA, the reflected spot should be steady. Adjust the DEC to minimize the diameter of the circle that is drawn. What is left, is the out-of-true on the DEC axis. That can be adjusted with the tube cradle alignment bolts.

Oct 17, 2008 | Meade Optics

1 Answer

Mirror lock


Possibly the shaft has jammed. Follow this link for a source of good information: http://www.mapug-astronomy.net/AstroDesigns/MAPUG/ArhvList.htm

From their files:
The locking knob has a gear on the inside end of its shaft. It engages teeth on the outside edge of a large metal disk connected to the mechanism that locks the position of the mirror on the central baffle tube. Rotating the locking knob one direction rotates the large disk to tighten the collet on the central baffle. Reversing direction loosens it.
The teeth do not extend all the way around the large disk. So sometimes the locking knob gear jams to a stop before the lock is fully engaged. Soon after the GPS scopes first started shipping Buck Harley discovered that in such cases you can remove the locking knob with its shaft and gear, then reach in and rotate the large disk with your finger. Replacing the locking knob will now allow sufficient rotation to fully engage the lock. If you happen to move the large disk in the wrong direction, then just repeat the process and move the disk in the other direction.
You don't need to tighten the lock down hard. Just a little snug is enough. You should not attempt to use the coarse focus knob while the mirror is locked. Damage to the focusing mechanism could result.
This design is intended to precisely hold the mirror position. So, yes, it is meant to allow effective use of a separate guide scope by eliminating mirror flop when in the locked position.

May 26, 2008 | Meade LX200GPS Telescope

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