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How do I wire 2 dual voice coil woofers to monobloc amp at 1 ohm.

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The higher the impedance, the better sound quality the amp has. It's the lower ohm you have to worry about. Zero ohms is a dead short. 1 ohm isn't too far from it. 4 ohm is farther yet. The lower the ohm, the harder the amp has to work. parallel,all speakers positive terminals to the positive terminal of the amplifier and connecting all of the speaker negative terminals to the negative terminal of the amplifier. in this case Parallel wiring is connecting components to a source so that they share the same voltage

Posted on Oct 30, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Connecting a 3000wat amp to a 14000wat dual woofer car sterio


Connect the dual woofer coils in series = 4 + 4 = 8 ohms. The home amp is safe at 8 ohm load.

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I need to wire 3 woofers but 2 are dual voice coil and one is single voice coil


sure, if you wish to wire them all together, wire the first dual voice coil subs first voice coil negative to 2nd voice coil positive, second voice coil negative to single voice coil sub positive, and single voice coil negative to 2nd dual voice coil subs 1st voice coil positve (again with the second dual voice coil sub, run the first voice coil negative to the 2nd voice coil positve) your speaker leads will be attatched to first dual voice coils 1st voice coil positive, and 2nd dual voice coils 2nd voice coil negative)

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How to wire a 12inch 4ohm dvc sub to 2ohm


Take two wires, equal length. Reach from positive of 1 coil and hook too positive of 2nd coil, now do the same with negative, neg to neg.. Then pos of sub to amp. And neg of sub too amp.

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To Mr. Hyde: you appear experienced with Bose 501 Series III speakers. I need to replace a burned out glass bulb fuse inside the right speaker, the fuse for the woofer I believe. I think that you said that...


Hello whit_hughes,

Just received your request for some information regarding Bose 501's......... Series III. Your looking for te manufacturers part # for the fuse which is in line with the woofer? The fuses used ON the Series III Crossovers (hard wired/soldered directly to crossover board/componants) have been Identified as BUSS #2494, 2amp, Quick-Blow Glass Tube Type Fuses. The fuse which is in-series with the woofer & the fuse which is in-series with the pair of tweeters are the same! In theory this means that the woofer is capable of twice the wattage of the tweeters due to the tweeters being wired in series with each other..... which in turn divides the power beween the two equaly. On the woofer circuit there is only the one speaker or voice coil obsorbing the power. The woofer circuit being wired in parallel with the tweeter circuit again splits the power between the two cuircuits..... so in an ideal situation the woofer sees 50% total input power while the tweeters each see 25% total input power;;;; totaling 100% total. The way Bose has fused them in the Series III's is such that each branch can obsorb a total of 2 amps before shutting down each indivigual branch. This can be adventageous..... should peak power be exceeded causing loss of full load abruptly, Amplifier Power Output Transistors usually blow..... however when only half of the full cuircuit shuts down due to peak power exeeding limits causing one fuse to open (blow) ... the actual impedance (resistance) of the speaker increases protecting the Amplifiers Output Transistors! Thats the reason for the 2 fuses. Each of them are identical. They are soldered into place.... via the wire which is attached to each end of the fuse. (Note; the fuse "kit" Bose is trying to sell you is an external in line fuse holder for each speaker {costing 1.29 each} & 2 fuses for each holder, One for now & One for Later aftr it blows {costing 1.00 each}..... costing Bose 6.58, neting Bose $13.42 Profit!!!! Keep in mind that this fuse WILL NOT FIX YOUR PROBLEM EITHER! DUE TO THE FUSE WHICH IS PRESENTLY BLOWN HAS NOT BEEN REPLACED!!!!! ) The one that has to be replaced is on the crossover... not between the Amplifier & the Speaker Enclosure. Tools required = 1 Long Big Straight Blade Screwdriver to pry off speaker grill, 1 Phyllips Screwdriver to remove screws seccuring woofer to encloser... be carefull not to damage/tear gasket, 1 pair side cutters to cut blown fuse out of crossover curcuit, 1 pair needle nose pliers to attach NEW fuse to crossover curcuit, 1 soldering Iron & a small piece of solder to re-solder fuses leads securly to crossover curcuit. ( replace gasket, woofer, screws, & speaker grill. ENJOY! Should additionaL informaton be required please let me know.... you'll have to leave me your e-mail address for pictures or drawings.... as I don't think they can be sent through this site. Hope this helps ya..... Its an EASY JOB...... you CAN DO IT! & will be glad you did when your done, they'll sound GREAT! ) GOOD LUCK!

Jun 22, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

I have the Harman Kardon AVS 235 reciever and once it gets to a certain volume (which is not too loud) it shuts down and goes into protective mode. All speaker wires are fine and no bare wires touching.


dust inside the receiver? prolly not too much.

how about ohmage? ensure that the speakers are the proper ohmage OR higher (at least prolly 8 ohms, 8? ) and ensure that you do not have multiple speakers hooked up to any channel, as two 8 ohm speakers in parallel on the same circuit would reduce the ohmage to 4 ohms.

also ensure that you do not have any fried vioce coils in any of your speakers (woofers, mids or tweeters). a fried voice coil could reduce the ohmage as well. if necesarry, use a multimeter to test each speakers ohmage, an 8 ohm speaker should not test any lower than 6 ohms at rest with a multimeter.

if its not an ohmage issue, and all speaker wires are verified fine, then it is the amp itself- prolly an integrated circuit chip, which are usually not repairable by the user.

Mar 09, 2011 | Harman Kardon AVR 235 Receiver

1 Answer

My onkyo reciever (tx-ds656) powers on, then after a couple seconds says "protect" and powers down. why is this happening? rmill24@yahoo.com


"protect" comes on for 4 reasons.

1. crossed or damaged speaker wires- make sure that the positive and negative is not crossed at all. inspect the wiring for any loose strands of wire that might be crossed, touching the speaker frame or touching the metal case of the amp. look for any damage to the wires. use new speaker wires, if you need to.

2. improper speaker ohmage- verify that your speakers are 8 ohms or greater. ohmage is usually labeled on the back of the speaker, and will have the greek letter "Omega" ω next to the ohmage rating. example: 8ω or 16ω.

3. blown speaker- push in on the woofers, it should move freely for an inch or 2 before bottoming out. if it feels like its scratchy or rubbing or there is any resistance before it bottoms out, then the speaker's voice coil is melted.

4. blown amp.

Nov 07, 2010 | Onkyo TX-DS656 Receiver

1 Answer

Marantz SR 7200


Most often it is due to improper speaker loading. In other words, it needs to have from 4 to 8 ohms speaker load and you wired your speakers in parallel when they should have been wired in series. What would have been an 8 ohm speaker load in series, turns into a 2 ohm load when in parallel. And with dual voice coil speakers you just compound the problem. And don't even get me started on bridged outputs.
Anyway that is what usually causes an amp to fry. Good luck.

Aug 03, 2008 | Marantz SR-7000 Receiver

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Wiring dual voice coil speakers


need to bridge 15" dual voice coil speaker

Jul 10, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

I have 2 dual voice coil subs and there are four connectors on one side of the sub 1 2 -1-2 how to determine wich ones go together


it depends on whether you want to wire them in series or parallel

series-put a wire between one of the red and black and leave a pigtail put another wire between the other red and black and leave another pigtail use one for positive and the other for negative
parallel- put a wire between the two reds and leave a pigtail put a wire between the two blacks and leave a pigtail- use the blacks for your negative and the reds for your positive
1=positive(red)
2=negative(black)
if your amp has a 4 channel output don't wire the 1's and 2's together- .wire them in pairs of 1 + 2 to each of the amp outputs

Apr 09, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

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