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Understanding RAM specs

Hi eletech, I was hoping you could help me out with this one:
What's the diff between say, 4gb of 667 or 800Mhz ram and 2gb of 1066 or 1200? Is less Ram at high speed a better option? I guess it goes without saying that 4gb at 1200Mhz would be ideal, but I dont think I can afford that.
Mobo is ASUS p5q se/r

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  • findads Oct 30, 2008

    the processor is 3.16 core 2 duo, mobo is asus p5q se/r (capable of handling 16gb ram!??) At this stage Im prob going to go with kingston ddr2 2gb sticks *2. but then, why would they make a 16g board?

  • jason May 11, 2010

    no , because your processor is the one doing the transfer speed

    if you want 4g with a faster rate then two 2g ram chips with the 1200mhz transfer would be faster

    but if you have a 4g at 800mhz it will be faster, because of the time it takes the two 2g chips to transfer will be more time since theres two of them transfering instead of only one doing the job

    the way they work is the amount of info transfered at one time, that determines how much better they are. the more info that can be transfered at once the better, but how fast that info is transfered depends on the processor



    does that help you understand a little more?



    electech

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Sorry to disagree with you Electech1, but you don't quite understand how memory works. Let me explain:

The memory transfer speed is determined by the memory bus speed. This is determined by the motherboard in question. The specs for this should be listed with the motherboard specs. Installing memory sticks that are capable of a higher speed WILL NOT make the memory access faster. As an example, the old PC100 and PC133 memory sticks worked with 100 and 133MHZ bus speeds respectively. Installing PC133 sticks into a machine designed for PC100 would work fine, but at teh same speed as PC100. Installing PC100 memory sticks into a bus designed for PC133 could work but would not be guaranteed and could fail in odd ways. This was because the PC100 memory was not tested to work at the higher bus speed. The bottom line is that the memory installed MUST be matched to the bus speed.

Depending upon the design of the process and memory system, it is possible to have parallel memory accesses. The physical number of memory sticks will not have any significant impact on this.

In terms of the processors:

Dual core means that both processors can be active performing a single program in parallel. This means that a process that requires 100 cycles of processor time can be completed in less than 100 cycles of true time because of parallelism. This happens at the instruction level and is handled by software language compilers that generate the end instruction stream in such a fashion as to provide parallel operations. I could go on for days on how this works, but realize that in effect this type of design allows for parallel operations which will cut down the actual time required to complete functions.

The amount of parallel operation will depend upon the type of program being run. The more calculation intensive the application, the more likely benefit of parallel operations.

Dan

Posted on Oct 31, 2008

  • ABRsvcs Nov 03, 2008

    Not to be argumentative here, but Electech1, you do not understand how the dual and quad cores work. Compiler technology has advanced to the point where even signel threaded applications can take advantage of multi-core processors. No matter what language you use, the computer only understands 1s and 0s. Even more than that, it can only add and shift. Without getting into a long drawn out discussion about computer architecture (I have taught courses on this for college), there will be a benefit to multiple instructions being executed in parallel even with standard non-computational programs. The root of the Digital Equipment Alpha processor used this technology (which was later incorporated into the Intel chipset), to increase the efficiency of overall processing by scheduling instructions for the CPU to execute so there were few to no wasted cycles. Some instructions take multiple clock cycles to complete. If a parallel processor can execute instructions while another completes its own, there is parallelism and improved performance. The dual and quad core CPUs incorporate this as do the compilers that generate the code streams. Therefore, it is likely that a duial or quad core system will exceed the performance of an even faster clocked single CPU.



    Dan

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Each type of duo is different, but mostly it disables one to conserve power untill the extra processing is needed
click the link and read! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Core

Posted on Nov 01, 2008

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They expect to devlope a 8g ram, and that would boost memory transfer to the highest possible for that board, but also a new developement for a new board they are working on, which would allow the ram to be used in the boards they are developing

electech

Posted on Oct 31, 2008

  • 2 more comments 
  • jason Oct 31, 2008

    also on the core duo works like this : when one processor is at its full speed then the other one starts to proccess untill it reaches its highest speed, if needed , each processor is rated at 1.58g



    electech

  • jason Nov 01, 2008

    Multi-cores provide multi-threading wherein it subdivides the tasks on its cores. Thus A 2.4 GHz processor can subdivide tasks into it's 4x 2.4 ghz cores. Intel's multicore architecture is different from AMD's. Intel's Core2 quadcores is like having 4 employees that can do different tasks, AMD's Phenom quadcore is like having 4 employees that can do the same tasks thus whenever there is an overloading of tasks on a core, another core can help.

    Aside from that, the *software* needs to be able to utilize a dual core processor for it to take advantage of running tasks simultaneously. If the music software you are using is not **multi-threaded** it will only utilize ONE core. In this case a single core fast processor is better than a dual core, because only "half" of the dual core's total processing power will be used, whereas 100% of the single core processor will be used.

    In the most basic terms, if your playing a game that needs a fast CPU, stay with the fastest single core you can get, x32 VS x64 is a totally different argument.
    If your someone that does a lot of multi-tasking work, or an maybe using an application that does a lot of things at once, like photoshop, you will see a good benefit to using dualcore. Maybe you just like to run teamspeak while listening to music on itunes while posting on your blog and killing aliens on halo, that would be a case for dualcore. If you run only the game, or only crunch numbers, or only browse the web, single minded tasking, that's single core world.

  • jason Nov 01, 2008

    Update [Sept. 2007]: At this point, pretty much any motherboard you buy is going to have either Dual Channel DDR, DDR2, or DDR3. Most but not all Dual Channel supporting motherboards will operate in a slower single channel mode if using one stick of ram, but work best with ram in pairs. On these boards its best not to try the odd 3 stick of ram configuration though as some motherboards will have problems operating in this fasion or plain won't POST.

    It's worth noting that at this point, RAMBUS is no longer widely available nor is it supported by any curent motherboard chipset. Those with Rambus based systems are strongly encouraged to upgrade to systems utilizing DDR2 or DDR3. As far as which to go with, [DDR2 vs DDR3] right now DDR2 is much much more common than DDR3 and cheaper. DDR3 will probably start becoming common sometime in 2008 when more motherboard chipsets come out with full support for it.

  • jason Nov 01, 2008

    it is important that you understand how to figure out the processor multiplier and the proper system clock. When you go to purchase a processor you are told in the ad / description for the processor what FSB it has. To determine the proper system clock for the processor simply divide the FSB by the performance enhancer (2 for the double pumped bus on AMD Athlon XP/Thunderbird/Duron processors or 4 for the quad pumped bus on the Intel Pentium 4).

    If your processor has a ... FSB then the system clock speed should be:

    66MHz (Various Celeron and older): 66MHz clock
    100MHz (Pentium II / Pentium III / K6): 100MHz clock
    133MHz (Pentium II / Pentium III / K6): 133MHz clock
    200MHz (Athlon, Duron, Thunderbird): 100MHz clock
    266MHz (Thunderbird, XP): 133MHz clock
    333MHz (XP): 166MHz clock
    400MHz (Pentium 4): 100MHz clock
    400MHz (AMD XP): 200MHz clock
    533MHz (Pentium 4): 133MHz clock
    800MHz (Pentium 4): 200MHz clock
    800MHz (AMD64): 200MHz clock
    1066MHz (Pentium 4/LGA775): 266MHz clock
    1333MHz (Pentium 4/LGA775): 333MHz clock

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