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Static build up on motherboard

How do i prevent static buildup on my gateway m series motherboard? this causes my computer to shut down and it's hard for me to cut it back on.

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This fix doesn't seem correct. pulling the battery will make the system lose date time at least. the solution Dell gave me for this very same problem was to pull the power cord and the press and hold the power button for 15-20 seconds. this dissipates any charge left in the motherboard. then reconnect the power cord and restart the machine. obviously this isn't a preferred solution, only a work-around until the real problem can be corrected which will likely be a motherboard replacement.

Posted on Apr 13, 2010

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Newer boards dont collect static as much so i doubth this can be an issue, if you find your self having to flash the board often its proberally the cmos or the processor needs reseating. If its the cmos you may need to change the board. I trick i use is to remove the battery and rund the system without one!!

Posted on Oct 29, 2008

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Hard drive on gateway SX2802 will not boot installed Windows 7


Dont change anything in BIOS until you have tried other options.

WARNING: Before you start troubleshooting remember that you are dealing with electricity that can KILL.

http://www.kitchentablecomputers.com/static.php - rules



Only work inside the computer case when the power has been switched off and disconnected. Never open the power source.



Some of the below steps recommend removing physical parts within the computer. While in the computer it is highly recommend that you be aware of ESD and its potential hazards



Remove the memory modules from their slots.

Take the opportunity to clean the slots on the motherboards and the memory module connectors.



Use compressed air to blow dust away and clean contacts with a soft cloth.

Do not use a metallic vacuum cleaner if it touches any component it may create a short and cause damage to the motherboard or other components.



Do not use solvent that may attract dust and never poke things like cotton buds in to slots. lightly rub an alcohol on a cloth not to hard let the alcohol do the work on the copper gold or silver tabs and r



Allow the pins to dry. They will air dry in a matter of minutes



If reseating the memory did not resolve the issue try swapping the location of the memory.

If you have only one stick of memory in the computer try moving it to another slot and then boot the computer.


Check the memory module and memory slot contacts.

They are either copper tin or gold.

The colour will tell you which they are.



Mixing tin and gold can result in corrosion that prevents proper contact.

Look for any sign of physical damage to the memory module, memory slots or the motherboard.



Reseat the memory modules.


You should hear an audible click when they are in place.

Do not use too much force to reseat the memory module in to the slot this can cause damage to the module, slot or motherboard.

The hardware that you are trying to access is damaged or failing.






There is a connection problem such as a bad cable

for internal hard drives


Test all power and data leads that attach to your hard drive SATA


the leads from your MOTHERBOARD TO THE HARD DRIVE make sure they have a

secure dust free connections and are not faulty.


Make sure all leads that are attached to your drives dvd\cd and floppy (If Applicable) have secure connections and are not faulty.


Computers need Power and Data to travel through every working device and continue an uninterrupted cycle and have an end so any faulty leads will end up with a computer error.

Could be a problem with the Hard Drive or the Hard drives PCB

http://www.onepcbsolution.com/



Hope this helps.

Nov 23, 2012 | Gateway SX280201 PC Desktop

Tip

Cleaning your Motherboard effectively


Motherboard cleaningWhy? Dust and especially particles of cigarette smoke can build up and corrode circuitry causing various problems such as computer lockups
Note: When inside the computer take the necessary ESD precautions and try to avoid unplugging any cables or other connections.
Procedure: Our recommendation when cleaning the motherboard from dust, dirt, or hair is to use compressed air. When using compressed air, hold it in the up-right position; otherwise, it is possible chemicals may come out of the container that could damage or corrode the Motherboard or other component within the computer. Also, ensure when using compressed air that you always blow the dust or dirt away from the motherboard, or out of the case.
Another good alternative to compressed air is to use a portable battery powered vacuum that can effectively remove the dust, dirt, and hair from the motherboard completely and prevent it from getting trapped within the case. However, do not use a standard electricity powered vacuum as it can cause a lot of static electricity that can damage the computer. When using the vacuum it is vital that you stay a couple inches away from the motherboard and all other components to help prevent contact as well as to help prevent anything from being sucked into the vacuum. Ensure that you do not remove any small components with the vacuum such as jumpers.
Tip: When cleaning the inside of the case also look at any fans and/or heat sinks. Dust, dirt, and hair collects around these components the most.

on Feb 01, 2010 | PC Desktops

Tip

How to Build a Computer


Have you ever thought about building your own computer? Actually buying a motherboard and a case ­along with all the supporting components and assembling the whole thing yourself?
Here are three reasons why you might want to consider taking the plunge:
  1. You will be able to create a custom machine that exactly matches your needs.
  2. It will be much easier to upgrade your machine in the future because you will understand it completely.
  3. You may be able to save some money.
And, if you have never done it before, you will definitely learn a lot about computers.
­In this article, we'll take you through the entire process of building a computer. You'll learn how to choose the parts you will use, how to buy them and how to put them all together. When you're done, you will have exactly the machine that you need. Let's get started.
The first step in building a computer is deciding what type of machine you want to build. Do you want a really inexpensive computer for the kids to use? A small, quiet machine to use as a media computer in the living room? A high-end gaming computer? Or maybe you need a powerful machine with a lot of disk space for video editing. The possibilities are endless, and the type of machine you want to build will control many of the decisions you make down the line. Therefore, it is important to know exactly what you want the machine to accomplish from the start.­
­ Let's imagine that you want to build a powerful video editing computer. You want it to have a dual-core CPU, lots of RAM and a terabyte of disk space. You also want to have FireWire connectors on the motherboard. These requirements are going to cause you to look for a motherboard that supports:
  • Dual-core CPUs (either Intel or AMD)
  • At least 4GB of high-speed RAM
  • Four (or more) SATA hard drives
  • FireWire connections (possibly in both the front and back of the case)
­ Then it all needs to go in a case with enough space to hold multiple hard disks and enough air ­flow to keep everything cool.
With any computer you build, knowing the type of machine you want to create can really help with decision-making.

Choosing a Motherboard Choosing a motherboard is the most interesting part of any building project. The reason it is so interesting is because there are hundreds of motherboards to choose from and each has its own advantages and disadvantages.
One easy way to think about motherboards is to break them up into a few categories. For example:
  • Cheap motherboards: Generally in the $50 range, these are motherboards for older CPUs. They are great for building inexpensive machines.
  • Middle-of-the-road motherboards: Ranging in price from $50 to $100, these are one step up from the cheap motherboards. In many cases you can find motherboard and CPU combos in this price range, which is another great way to build a cheap machine or an inexpensive home/office computer.
    -->

  • High-end motherboards: If you are building a powerful gaming machine or video workstation, these motherboards give you the speed you need. They range in price from $100 to $200. They handle the latest CPU chips at their highest speeds.
  • Extreme motherboards: Falling into the over-$200 range, these motherboards have special features that boost the price. For example, they might have multiple CPU sockets, extra memory slots or special cooling features.
You need to decide whether you are building a "cheap machine," a "high-end machine" or a "tricked-out super machine" and then choose your motherboard accordingly. Here are some other decisions that help narrow down your motherboard choices:
    CAPTION
    -->
  • Do you want to use an Intel or an AMD processor? Making this choice will cut the number of motherboards in half. AMD chips are often cheaper, but lots of people are die-hard Intel fans.
  • What size motherboard do you want to use? If you are trying to build a smaller computer, you may want to look at micro ATX cases. That means you will need to buy a micro ATX motherboard. Otherwise you can use a normal ATX motherboard and case. (There are also smaller motherboard form factors like mini-ITX and even nano-ITX if you want to go really small.)
  • How many USB ports do you want? If you want several, make sure the motherboard can handle it.
  • Do you need FireWire? It's nice if the motherboard handles it (although it is also possible to add a card).
  • Do you want an AGP or PCI Express graphics card? Or do you want to use a graphics card on the motherboard to keep the price and size down? If you want to go the cheapest route, make sure the motherboard includes a video card on-board (easiest way to tell is to see if there is a DVI or VGA connector on the motherboard). PCI Express is the latest/greatest thing, but if you want to re-use an AGP card you already own, that might be a reason to go with AGP.
  • Do you want to use PATA (aka IDE) or SATA hard disks? SATA is the latest thing, and the cables are much smaller.
  • What pin configuration are you using for the CPU? If you want to use the latest CPUs, make sure that your motherboard will accept them.
  • Do you want to try things like dual video cards or special high-speed RAM configurations? If so, make sure the motherboard supports it.
If you don't care about any of this stuff (or if it all sounds like gibberish to you), then you're probably interested in building a cheap machine. In that case, find an inexpensive motherboard/CPU combo kit and don't worry about all of these details.
Installing RAM and the Microprocessor But before we start building, we need to say one thing about static electricity. Most of the parts you will be handling when you assemble your computer are highly sensitive to static shocks. What that means is that if you build up static electricity on your body and a shock passes from your body to something like a CPU chip, that CPU chip is dead. You will have to buy another one.
The way you eliminate static elec­tricity is by grounding yourself. There are lots of ways to ground yourself, but probably the easiest is to wear a grounding bracelet on your wrist. Then you connect the bracelet to something grounded (like a copper pipe or the center screw on a wall outlet's face plate). By connecting yourself to ground, you eliminate the possibility of static shock.
Each combination of parts is unique. But in general, here are the basic steps you will need to follow when you assemble your machine:
­First, you'll need to unwrap the motherboard and the microprocessor chip. The chip will have one marked corner that aligns with another marked corner of its socket on the motherboard. Align the corners and drop the microprocessor into the socket. You don't need to apply any pressure - if it's aligned correctly, it should fall into place. Once you have it in, cinch it down with the lever arm.
Now, you need to install the heat sink. The CPU box will contain a manual that tells you how to do it. The heat sink will contain either a heat sink sticker or heat sink grease to use when mounting the heat sink on the CPU. Follow the instructions closely to install it. To install our heat sink, all we had to do was put it in place, cinch it down with flanges on either side and lock it with a cam. Connect the power lead for the heat sink to the motherboard.
Next, you'll install the RAM. Look on the motherboard for the slot marked "one" and firmly press the RAM module into it. It will probably take more pressure than you'd think to get the RAM into place. Each side of the module should also have a rotating arm that will lock the RAM down.
Now your motherboard is ready to put in the case.

on Dec 27, 2009 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

How to build a or assemble a computer and troubleshoot?


Building a computer will require: a motherboard, a processor, memory, a video card or motherboard with onboard video, a sound card or motherboard with onboard sound, at least one hard drive, a CD or DVD drive, a case for the computer components, a power supply, fans to cool the computer, an operating system, a monitor, speakers, keyboard, mouse, 2-3 hours to assemble the computer.
You must ensure that all of the components are compatible with one another. After receiving the parts, lay everything out on a large, clean surface. Make sure you are grounded by touching a metal surface; this will prevent the transfer of static electricity to your computer components.
Typically, the steps to install the components are as follows: 1. mount the power supply in the case, 2. mount the motherboard 3. lock the processor in the socket on the motherboard 4. insert the memory sticks into the slots on the motherboard 5. mount the processor fan on the processor 6. insert the video card into the applicable slot on the motherboard 7. insert the hard drive into a hard drive bay in the case, 8. insert the CD drive into a CD drive bay, 9. mount any fans you have to the fan cutouts on the case 10. connect all applicable data cables to the CD and hard drives 11. connect all applicable power cables to the motherboard, video card, processor, hard drive, CD drive, and any other components. 12. connect the front panel USB, power, lights, and reset connectors to the motherboard 13. close the case 14. connect the power, monitor, speakers, keyboard, and mouse to the computer
Because this process is rather involved, I recommend following a guide such as this one: http://www.maximumpc.com/article/how-tos/how-_build_silent_gaming_pc
It details the process, includes pictures, and even provides a list of compatible parts.

Jun 19, 2011 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

My GATEWAY DX4840-11e did not power up, so I CHATTED with ONLINE support and they resolved it with me performing a POWER DRAIN. That worked temporarily because when I powered up the next day, I have to...


CMOS Checksum Error, and having to set the Date/Time repeatedly, generally points to a bad CMOS battery.
If it were I, I would replace the battery with a new one. However this is what I would do.

Your computer is still under warranty. Opening the computer case may void the warranty.
Therefore you may not come to the same decision that I would.

On the motherboard is a round flat battery about the size of a U.S. Nickle.
It's a type of watch battery. Generally a CR2032.

Example;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CR2032_battery

A CMOS battery will generally last from 4 to 7 years. Perhaps the CMOS battery installed in your Gateway is bad. Just a lemon that came from the battery factory.

The battery holder on the motherboard is rounded in shape to fit the battery, and has a metal clip inside. There are different styles of fastening used in the clip design, but generally a small tab of the clip is eased to the outside edge of the battery holder, thereby releasing the battery.

This article will 'shed more light' on the various styles of CMOS battery holders,

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/81

Proper procedure in order to replace the CMOS battery;

1) Unplug the computer from power.
[NOTE* Always unplug the power cord from the surge protector, and not from the computer's Power Supply. (Back of the computer) Unplugging from the Power Supply MAY cause a voltage spike. ]

2) Observe Anti-Static Precautions

Anti-Static Precautions:
Your body carries Static electricity.
Static will fry out (Short Circuit) the delicate hardware components inside a computer.
ALWAYS relieve your body of Static BEFORE working on a computer.

Computer unplugged from power, computer case open, TOUCH the metal frame of the open computer case.
This action will relieve your body of Static.

Should you leave your computer in the middle of working on it, be SURE to Touch the metal frame again upon your return.

3) Opening the computer case:
This is Gateway Support, and the Support Documents page for the Gateway DX4840 series of Desktop Computers,

http://support.gateway.com/us/en/s/desktop/2010/gateway/dx/dx4840/DX4840nv.shtml

I would like you to click on - Product Views.
Now click on Rear View.

Observing the rear of the computer look at the right side. Along the edge down towards the bottom is a screw. This screw is removed, then the Side Panel is pulled towards the rear of the computer.
(There is a raised portion, or hump, in the Side Panel for placing your fingers)

If your Gateway DX4840-11e desktop computer has an Asus M2N32-SLI Deluxe motherboard, the CMOS battery is located down towards the bottom of the motherboard, and slightly to the right.

For additional questions, or clarification to what I have stated, please post in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

May 01, 2011 | Gateway Desktop / Intel Core i3 Processor...

1 Answer

I have a Gateway GT5662 desktop and when I turn the computer on only the fans come on. I have replaced the power supply and the computer still will not boot up. Could it be a problem with the...


This could be caused by a number of different problems. The power supply would have been my first guess. But it could also be a problem with the motherboard. In fact, a bad power supply could often cause damage to the motherboard.
Other possible causes could be a bad memory module, damaged CPU, or even having the hard drives not properly plugged in.
The easiest thing to try would be taking out your memory modules one by one and trying to start the computer. And then double-checking the hard drive connections. Other than that, it will become hard to diagnose the problem unless you have spare components you can swap out. It might be best to take it in to a shop where they can test the components, unless it's under warranty. In that case, you'd do better to deal with the manufacturer.
Also, when you work inside your computer, be sure to protect it from static discharge. The best way is to wear an antistatic wrist strap. You can get them for just a few dollars.
Hope this helps!

Feb 25, 2011 | Gateway GT5662 Desktop PC

1 Answer

Gateway dx 4820 power up problem


Let's start with some of the basics.

1) Since you were checking connections on the motherboard, was the power unplugged from the computer, AND did you follow Anti-Static precautions?

[Anti-Static Precautions:

Your body carries Static electricity.
Static WILL fry out (Short Circuit), the hardware components inside a computer.

You may not even see it, or feel it.

Computer unplugged from power, computer case open, computer on a table.
TOUCH the metal frame of the open computer case to relieve your body of Static.

Should you get up in the middle of working on your computer, and leave, upon your return Touch the metal frame again.
Or use an ESD wrist strap, and connect the alligator clip to the metal frame ]

2) Computer unplugged from power, anti-static precautions followed, remove all ram memory modules, and reinsert them. In fact, it would behoove you to clean the contact pins on the bottom of the ram memory modules, before reinserting them.

Clean with a pencil eraser. Remove the eraser dust, with air pressure from a can of compressed air for computers, or air pressure from your mouth may be sufficient.

You may have bumped the ram memory modules.
Even if they look to be seated, it only takes a few minutes to remove, and reinstall.

After time, corrosion can develop on the gold plated contact pins, at the bottom of the ram memory modules. Doesn't take long to clean them with a pencil eraser.

Handle the ram memory module by the body. The body, is coated with a clear see-through protective plastic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Generic_DDR_Memory_%28Xytram%29.jpg

The above link, is only provided for an illustration of the gold plated contact pins, I am referring to.

It is DDR Sdram ram memory, and has 184 contact pins. 92 on each side.

Your computer uses DDR3 Sdram ram memory.
Has 240 contact pins. 120 on each side, and the Locating Notch is in a different place.

3) Are you sure the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, is plugged in tightly to the motherboard?

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

This is power for your Processor.

http://support.gateway.com/s/desktop/2009/gateway/dx/dx4820/DX4820nv.shtml

SATA power cable is plugged in tightly to your SATA harddrive?

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#sata

If your SATA harddrive has provisions for plugging in a SATA power cable, and a 4-pin Peripheral power cable, BE SURE that only the SATA power cable is plugged in.

Plugging both in will fry out the harddrive. Maybe not right away, but will down the road.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Reply back in a Comment.

Jul 03, 2010 | Gateway DX4820-01 PC Desktop

2 Answers

After about minutes of running the computer just


this sounds like an overheating problem.

First thing i would check would be the CPU fan. you will have to remove the side access panel on the case to check this.
If the CPU cooling fan is covered in dust, and the spaces between the cooling fins on the heatsink (right underneath the CPU fan) are clogged with dust. it would cause this problem.
there is also a fan at the back of the computer inside the power supply that can get clogged with dust, and may possibly overheating and shutting off. if you look in the back of your computer and find where the power cord plugs in, the power supply cooling fan is right around there as well.

If there is a good buildup of dust, it would be best to have your computer professionally cleaned. Using a vaccum cleaner is not a good idea unless you are familiar with procedures of working with static sensitive components.

hope this helps

Feb 15, 2010 | Gateway LX6810-01 PC Desktop

1 Answer

Gateway Profile 4 with two hard drive failures


How do you know 2 hard drives have failed, have the hard drives been fin in another computer.

most likely the OS is corrupt on the disks caused my another hardware issue, most likey Motherboard IDE/sata controller.

Sep 06, 2009 | Gateway Profile 4 All In One (MPN...

2 Answers

My acer 5420 keeps overheating and shutting down


Clean the insides of your Desktop case.

1. make sure all the fans(CASE FANS, POWER SUPPLY FANS AND CPU FANS) are working dust and lint free.
2.remove dust and dirt build up in CPU heat sinks.
3. remove dust and dirt build up in the motherboard, RAM and
expansion slots.
4. remove dust and dirt build up on CD-ROM's, Hard Disk Drives and expansion bays.
5.apply new thermal paste on your CPU.

Jan 20, 2009 | PC Desktops

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