Question about Kenwood KAC-9102D Car Audio Amplifier

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Amps protection if your subs voice coils are heating up to much will this shut down the amp

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No but eventually you will melt the varnish coating the wires on the voice coil and will cause the voice coil to fall to short and could possible blow the Amplifier. and definately ruin the speaker.

Posted on Sep 08, 2006


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I have a kenwood excelon xr-4s amplifier and in channel 1 and 2 i have front speakers, in 3 and 4 i have a infinity kappa doble coil 4ohm each coil. When i turn it on loud it shut down the amp and start on...

Since you have two dual 4 ohm voice coil subs, hopefully you had one sub wired in parallel to each channel separately (one sub on 3, one sub on 4). That way, each channel gets 2 ohms. If you have both subs bridged across channels 3 and 4 (left + and right -) then you have applied a 1 ohm load to your amp, which would cause the problem you're having. It's possible the amp has been damaged, but the fuses on the amp should have blown to protect the amp. Check your sub wiring to make sure you don't have a 1 ohm load bridged across channels 3 and 4. Also check the fuses on the amp itself to make sure neither of them have blown. If everything is fine there, check your fuse under the hood that's connected to your battery. That fuse could have also blown.

Nov 14, 2017 | Car Audio & Video

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Hi i have two 12inch l5 with dual4voice coil one is not working i think because the speaker works till turned up to like 10 then repeat cuts the amp off unless u keep it down then plays fine so i think...

OK, are you using a 2 channel amp? If so, the problem could be in your amp. If you are saying that when you turn it up real loud the amp shuts off, then comes back on after you turn it down. Your amp is going into protection. Most amps are not equiped with thermal and voltage protection. This means if the amp is too hot, it will shut down before it melts the motherboard. Also, if it detects fluctuations in voltage, it will shut down. Things to think about. How many watts RMS is the amp supposed to do and at what ohms load it is stable at. How to I have my subs wired (series, parallel), and what ohm load am I asking from the amplifer.

Now, each dual voice coil sub should have two sets of + and -. Each one of those + and - sets provides the power for a single voice coil. So, by unhooking one side, you not reduce your sub to operating on a single voice coil. Not a good idea, since it will wear down that coil and it will fail.

If you are saying that you "cut" wires on the sub, like between the + and - connectors and the spyder, you are ruining the sub. Those wires can be soldered, but usually don't perform like they were designed and usually fail shortly after the repair. A white dot on one of those connectors usually represents the positive side of the connection.

You will probably end up investing in another sub. Also, you need to think about your amplifier situation, before you blow another sub. Hope this helps

Aug 24, 2011 | Car Audio & Video

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Trying to wire to 2 dual-voice coil Memphis sub-wooffers in box

If both subs are dual voice coil, you can wire one voice coil to other voice coil on each sub. Do this by running the ground of each coil to the ground of the other coil. Do the same for the positive. After doing this on both subs, you should have one ground and one positive per sub. Hook one up to the left channel of amp and one up to the right....This should work for you. If your amp plays for a while then goes into protection mode, then it cannot handle the ohm load.

Jan 01, 2011 | Kenwood KAC-728S Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

Speaker or amp?

your running too low impedence, and yes its cuz of your sub wiring. How to wire it depends if its 2ohm dual voice coil, or 4ohm dual voice coil, so i'll explain both. O.K. first of all i hope its 4 ohm so you can get max power from your sub. If it is 4 ohm dual voice coil connect + to +, and - to - on your speaker, then to connect it to your amp, splice a wire into the wire running from + to + and connect it to your amp's + terminal. Do the same with your - wire. If its a 2 ohm dual voice coil, connect the + from one set of terminals on the speaker, to the - on the other terminal. Then to connect it to the amp, plug a wire from the open + terminal on the speaker and connect it to the + plug on the amp, and do, connect the empty - to the - on the amp. Good luck and if you have any questions don't hesitate to ask...

Sep 20, 2009 | Car Audio & Video

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I have a PHOENIX GOLD RYVAL V1502 amplifier and trying to hook it up at 2 ohms as it describes it can be 450watts x2 at 2 ohms running wires from bridged positive and negative to the first sub then two...

Hello mgonzalez390,

It sounds like the amp/subs impedance is not matched. According to the published specifications for the V1502 amp, it is only stable in bridged mode down to 4ohms, not 2ohms. You need to get the final impedance that the amp sees up to at least 4ohms or it will continue to shut down and eventually fail completely.

If your subs are dual voice coil and can be rewired so that each sub has an impedance of 8ohms, then you can safely parallel them to the amp like you have described. If they are single 4ohm voice coils, then you have 2 choices. Connect one sub to each channel or if you want to bridge the channels, then wire the subs in series, not in parallel. Wire the positive bridged terminal from the amp to the first sub positive, connect a jumper from the negative of that sub to positive on the other sub, and then the negative from that sub back to the negative bridged terminal on the amp. This wiring results in an 8ohm load to the amp and it should work OK without shutting down. But the power to each sub will actually be less than if you wire them separately to each channel.

Hope this helps.

Jul 08, 2009 | Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

Subwoofers pop then immediately produce no sound

Sounds like the two subs wired together might be too much of a load on the amp and it is shutting off. Try wiring the two subs in series. That will reduce the load on the amp but will conversely put out less power. Less is better than none though. In any case check your amp to see what the lowest ohm rating it can see, that ohm rating is where you want your subs and if faced with a choice of either going under (lower numerically) or over (higher numerically) GO OVER!-it is much safer.
Here's an article I wrote that can help explain how to wire the subs to the amp.


Wire the positive pole from one voice coil (using wire that is as thick or thicker than your wire from amp to sub) to the negative pole of the other voice coil (on the same sub). This will leave you with a positive pole from one voice coil and a negative pole from the other giving you the two leads that will be hooked up to the amplifier or other subs. When wiring in series, the ohms will go up numerically, and the load on the amp will go down. Almost all amplifiers power output will follow this rule, except some amps such as JL Audio's “Ohm matching” D Class amps.

Wire the positive pole from one voice coil (using wire that is as thick or thicker than your wire from amp to sub) to the positive pole of the other voice coil (on the same sub). Then wire the negative to the negative in the same way. You can then wire to the amp or other subs. When wiring in parallel the ohms will go down numerically, and the load on the amp will go up. Almost all amplifiers power output will follow this rule, except some amps such as JL Audio's “Ohm matching” D Class amps.

In order to match your amplifiers ohm rating you can use parallel and series wiring together, just keep things even for power distribution and to avoid phase issues.
Example: I have two “Type X 12” subs” that have dual 2ohm voice coils and have to match my “Amplifier X” ohm rating of 2ohms mono. In this case, I would wire each subwoofer in series (giving me a 4ohm load), and then wire the two subs in parallel to get my 2ohm mono load. When wiring multiple subs just, treat each sub as a voice coil and wire accordingly.

For example if “Amplifier X” can make 100watts@8ohms, it would make 200watts@4ohms and 400watts@2ohms. However with every drop in ohms the amplifier is put under more pressure. It starts to create a lot of heat, distortion figures begin to climb, damping rates drop, and some amps even throw power spikes when clipping. SO BE SURE TO CHECK YOUR AMPS RATING AND DO NOT EXCEED IT!


Apr 04, 2009 | Alpine Car Audio & Video

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Hi JJerky,

I suggest we go for 2 ohm to preserve the amp and not heat things up so bad.
Your Subs are Dual Voice Coil(DVC) and 2 ohms each coil. I am going to tell you the wiring to insure you get balanced response from both Subs. We will wire the Subs Voice coils in Parallel to make them 1 ohm each. Then we will wire the Amp to the subs in series to make the total load on the amp 2 ohms. When you have series to both subs each sub gets the same current.

Example of my coding :SUB1VC1+ = Subwoofer 1 Voice Coil 1 Postive terminal.

SUB1VC1+ to SUB1VC2+
SUB1VC1 - to SUB1VC2-

SUB2VC1 + to SUB2VC2 +
SUB2VC1 - to SUB2VC2 -

AMP + to SUB1VC1 +
SUB1VC1 - to SUB2VC1 +
SUB2VC1 - to AMP -

This should give you a good repsonse.

Adjust your Bass Gain down very low at first. Also cut you LPF to about 60 hz. Crank up the volume on a bass test Audio track, Adjust the Bass Gain up unitl you get distortion. The turn it back a little. This is proper setting for your Gain.

Dec 01, 2007 | Lanzar OPTI1222D Car Subwoofer

2 Answers

Unsureness of wiring configurations.


Get an amp with at least 200 Watts RMS. The RMS value is what is important about driving Subs. This could be proclaimed to be a 1000 Watt amp. REad the RMS value.

Wiring. It is better to series your Speakers to give them and your amp more reliability,

Get a Mono or Bridgeable amp. If it si bridgeable, BRidge the output as described in the manual you get. Some Amps have a diagram right on the output..

AMP+ to Sub1 +
Sub1 - to Sub2 +
Sub2 - to Amp -

Get a 4 Guage wring kit. Run your power wiring down the Drivers side, and Audio signal wiring down the Passenger side, keep the two separate.

Nov 26, 2007 | Kenwood 12" 4-Ohm Single-Voice-Coil...

1 Answer

Voice coils

if you push a sub too hard for too long the varnish on the coil windings will melt, causing parts of the coil wires to short toghther. This will change the impedance of of sub (or speaker). Since the speaker is hooked up to the amp and the amp requiring a steady impedance (usually 4ohm or 2 ohm). if the coils go bad , the impedance will change, the amp hopefully will go into a protect mode, if not the amp will damage itself. Warranty does not cover overpowering a sub of amp (if the can tell it was.) hope this helps.

Nov 10, 2006 | Kenwood KAC-9102D Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

Amp protection problem

I run one sub on my Kenwood Amp also. It does over heat also. My conclusion is that we are both trying to push that one sub too hard and the amp is having to work really hard to make that sub do what we are asking. Also, not having enough power or a good ground will cause it to over heat. I am going to go with the voice coils are heating up though.

Sep 16, 2006 | Kenwood KAC-9102D Car Audio Amplifier

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