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Tweeters are not working on jbl lx44

The bass and mid speakers are working but not the tweeters can some one help

Posted by Anonymous on

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Toufic Malek
  • 9 Answers

SOURCE: Speaker act more like tweeter only, not mid range + tweeter

They are mid Hi speakers.1st Open them and check if the mid speakers are ok maybe they are defected or the protection is open. Good Luck Toufic Malek

Posted on Sep 28, 2007

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: No sound from mids and bass

there is prolly just a short in the wire somewhere

Posted on Jan 14, 2008

TJBENGR
  • 121 Answers

SOURCE: Tweeters & Midrange Speakers

If you have a Ohm Meter, check the resistance to the speakers. If it is very high, the speakers are burned, (or the crossover is (just capacitors, and resisters...cheap)). If it is close to 4 ohms check the wiring and connectors..to and at the speakers, most likly the receiver/amp is not blown.

Posted on Apr 20, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Taking apart a JBL N24

I removed the tweeter and found that I could stick two fingers through the hole and touch the back of the speaker. I was afraid that if I applied to much force I would break something, but after seeing a schematic of the speaker I realized there was nothing else attached except the wires. So, I used some muscle. It took a lot of pressure, but the speaker finally popped out. I was able to tighten the one screw that held down the circuit board in the back and re-assembled the speaker. Problem fixed.

Posted on Nov 16, 2008

freetek
  • 5568 Answers

SOURCE: Speaker was dropped - Tweeter Magnet came off -

Clean the mating surfaces very well, mark on the side of the magnet (arrow or dot) which surface of the magnet was glued (shouldn't make a bit of difference, I'm just a little anal) and then use any brand of quick setting 'super glue.' This glue will not only hold well but will also introduce the thinnest film between the magnet and 'keeper.' Too much space between mating surfaces can weaken the field and reduce the efficiency causing an imbalance in volume relative to the other tweeter. If anything else is loose, the tweeter is junk because any shift of the voice coil will cause the speaker to distort or rattle.
If you need to replace any speaker ever, replace both channels or have possibly lousy matching between channels.

Posted on Apr 24, 2009

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1 Answer

Hooking up speakers


first off stock wiring for speakers,and or amp are with minimal wiring.Rewire system for better sound quality,also use noise suppresors if needed.

Jan 18, 2014 | Toyota Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

No sound from tweeter bx5a


First of all, never connect the audio from your receiver directly to the tweeter. You can blow the tweeter instantly. The mid-bass driver can be damaged from a direct connection as well.

Since you get absolutely no sound from either driver, this seems to implicate the crossover. If the crossover has opened, no signal gets through, if it has opened early in the signal path.

But, it is also possible that a short exists, and that perhaps your amp cuts off the output having sensed a short. The short could be in the crossover or one of the drivers.

Here are some troubleshooting tips--

To prevent damage to your amp, turn it off while making or breaking any connections inside the speaker boxes.

Write down which wires get connected to which place on the drivers, so you can get them back where they belong.

With your amp turned off, connect the bad speaker to your amp. You've already verified that no sound is produced when both drivers are connected.

So, with your amp off, disconnect one wire from the tweeter in the bad box.

Briefly turn your amp on and listen for sound.

If you get sound, the tweeter is shorted.

If you get no sound, with the amp off, reconnect the tweeter in the bad box and disconnect one wire from the mid-bass driver.

Briefly turn the amp on and listen before turning the amp off.

If you get sound now, but not before, the mid-bass driver is shorted.

If you got no sound either way, check the DC resistance of the mid-bass driver (only, not the tweeter. Ohmmeters put out a small DC voltage to test resistance. That DC voltage might damage a tweeter, maybe. Don't risk it). Ohm the mid-bass driver while it is not connected to the crossover. If the driver is good, you should read some ohms--a little less than the stated impedance. An 8 ohm driver might read 6.5 ohms, for instance. If you get an open or a short (with the crossover disconnected from the mid-bass driver) you have a blown driver. Two actually, since neither the tweeter nor the mid-bass driver produced any sound in the previous tests.

If you can't get ahold of an ohmmeter, try this--

Open the good, working speaker and place the two side by side.

Connect your amp to the bad speaker box only.

With your amp turned off, disconnect the wires from the mid-bass driver in the bad box and connect them to the mid-bass driver in the good box. Disconnect one of the wires from the "good" mid-bass driver first, so you don't have two crossovers connected to it at the same time--even if only one of them will get powered on. It keeps the confusion down to a minimum when trying to isolate your problem. Oh, and disconnect one wire from the bad tweeter, in case it is shorted.

Turn the amp on and listen briefly before turning the amp off.

If you got sound, the "bad" crossover is fine, but the "bad" mid-bass driver is blown. And, since you got no sound in the previous tests, the "bad" tweeter is blown, as well.

If you got no sound, try it the other way around. Meaning--

With the amp off, disconnect the speaker wires coming from your amp from the bad speaker box and connect them to the good speaker box.

Your amp is now connected only to the good speaker box.

With the amp still off, connect the mid-bass wires from the good box to the mid-bass driver in the bad box. Remember to disconnect one of the "bad" crossover wires from its own driver first, so only one crossover is connected to the "bad" mid-midbass driver. Remember to disconnect one wire from the "good" and "bad" tweeters, so the only sound you hear--if any--is from the "bad" mid-bass driver, powered by the "good" crossover.

If this produces sound, but the previous attempts failed, you have a crossover problem.

If you still get no sound, something went wrong and you need to retest the good speaker by itself and back up a few steps and try again.

Assuming you got sound from the "good" crossover while it was driving your "bad" mid-bass, make sure no wires have come loose inside the "bad" box. Assuming you have sound connections at each end of each wire, you now need to desolder the electrolytic capacitors from the circuit board.

Make sure you mark them first, so you can put them back where they belong.

You can remove only one at a time, if that helps.

Use an ohmmeter to check some components.

The big red coil should read pretty close to a short, maybe one ohm.

The capacitors should read open or infinite resistance, although you might see a steadily increasing resistance while the capacitor charges up from the ohmmeter. If you read a steady low resistance on a capacitor after it has been removed from the circuit board, that capacitor is bad and must be replaced. The markings on the capacitor should give you some clues as to the proper replacement.

All things considered, I suspect that your problem is a shorted electrolytic capacitor. But, I gave you all I could think of so you can narrow it down and isolate the problem, whatever it might be.

I hope this helps.

Feb 23, 2011 | M-Audio BX5a Speaker

1 Answer

Only bass driver working on the pair. tweeter and mid range cones not working.


hi,
check the tweeter and mid range. its coil may become faulty.
for checking the speakers carefully remove the speakers one by one, remove its connections.
and check the speakers with a AAA cell. is it producing cracking sound. if not the speakers coils are burned.
ok

Feb 01, 2011 | Mission 782 Main / Stereo Speaker

1 Answer

The tweeter and upper mid-range speaker quit working in one of my JBL s412p speakers. All wires are connected. Would this be a cross-over assembly problem? If so, where can I purchase a replacement?


Remove the speaker wire from your amplifier. Using a 1.5v battery place the wire on both ends of the battery. Observe if you can hear a cracking sound on the tweeter and the mid-range. If there is no sound., your speaker is busted and needs to be rewind or replaced.

Dec 06, 2010 | JBL S412P Main / Stereo Speaker

1 Answer

Internal wiring schematic for a JBL 4311 WX-A


the conductor xxx\blk is the minus or black( from speaker) the outher is positive\red pin from speaker) the woofer is bigest speaker inside is connected on the crossover at low output, tweeter at high output, if you connect wrong you can burn speakers and crossover, you can test with very low volume on amplifier.

1st connect low to woofer, it only her low freq below 500Hz like drums and bass, if connect on med out the speaker is working as handpocket old radio audio. if connect on high the speaker is like no audio out. (the woofer take about 60-75% of amp power).

2nd connect the midrange at mid output you can listen to human voice cristal clear. if connect on high output you listem like esteric female shouting.

And connect the tweeter at the empty output

Take particular attention on polarity terminals, if you exchange the polarity you have a moofle sound traped inside of speaker, and some structered box noise who may open the box panels in future.

Feb 16, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Powered 15" JBL EON


There are two power supplies in there, one for the woofer and one for the tweeter.
You may have blown one of them.
Are you under warranty? If so definitely check the JBL website for a local authorized repair center ... they are local people, usually very nice and easy to deal with, and the warranty coverage is excellent.

For audio expertise and PA system help with feedback and noise, try our new DVD "PA Systems for Small Groups" at www.rexark.com

Dec 28, 2009 | JBL EON 15-G2 Powered DJ Speaker With EQ...

1 Answer

Hallo


Got a pair of these at Damark for $72.[plus shipping] Can't think of anything bad to say about them. A basic 2-way design with a titanium tweeter and a 8" mid-woofer. Bass reflex with a rear firing port. 150 watt power handling. These little guys have guts PLUS nice tonal balance. Didn't find the tweets to be harsh as some say. Not as smooth as the EMIT-R by Infinity [my fave tweets] but still makes the high end shimmer. Sure there are better speakers in this design, but for those of us with limited resources, these were a real find. Get 'em while you can. 4 stars for performance plus 1 more for value.

Jun 09, 2009 | JBL HP82B Speaker

1 Answer

No sound from mids and bass


there is prolly just a short in the wire somewhere

Nov 28, 2007 | RCA RS2656 Shelf System

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