Question about Kenmore 63942 Dryer

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TCO & HLtherm on Dryer

I recently purchased a second-hand kenmore washer/dryer pair. The washer works fine. The dryer functions but does not heat. Air flow is good. I cleaned out quite a bit of lint. I checked the thermostats, thermal fuse, and TCO. All had an Ohm reading of 0.8 resistance (which I assume is okay), except for the TCO which had no continuity and thus was obviously blown. I also checked the heating element, which had 9ohms resistance, but it looked pretty charred, so I ordered a replacement for that too. Can the TCO blow out even if the high limit thermostat is functioning? Even though my HL-thermostat reading was fine (0.8 resistance), should I replace it anyway?
Dryer model #11066662501

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Okay, I replaced the TCO with a new one. But less than 10 minutes into the drying cycle it blew, so my dryer still isn't heating. My guess is that something is causing the heating element to get too hot which is triggering the TCO. Before I go and replace the TCO for the second time, I gotta figure out why it keeps blowing. Venting is okay. Lint has been cleaned out. All the thermostats read fine. The new heating element reads okay. Could the problem still be the high limit, or could there be a wiring malfunction?

Posted on Nov 19, 2008

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I think you've got your bases pretty well covered. I don't see a reason for you to replace the hi-limit as well. At less than an ohm, I see no reason to bother with it.

Posted on Oct 25, 2008

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Dryer works but want get hot to dry colthes


If your ELECTRIC dryer is still running, but does NOT produce heat, the following two links can give you advice on how to troubleshoot an ELECTRIC dryer with a no heat problem:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3576548-dryer_runs_but_does_not_heat

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3574266-thorough_dryer_advice


IMPORTANT: Your problem may or may not be related to a heating element problem as there are numerous factors that can cause a dryer not to heat. The heating element has protection devices that are designed to regulate the heat and internal temperatures. If the dryer overheats the Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) typically will blow BEFORE the heating element. The replacement kit is much cheaper than purchasing a new heating element that may or may not be the problem.


Again, begin by verifying the source voltage at the receptacle and service breaker, and verify your power cord.

The reason a dryer may still run if the input voltage is incorrect, is because the drive motor only uses a portion of the 220 service. The motor runs off 110-120VAC, while the heating circuits require 220-240VAC. So, if you are missing 1/2 your input voltage due to a tripped breaker or bad power cord, your dryer may exhibit these symptoms.

If you determine the problem to be internal, the heating circuits will either be located in the rear of the dryer on the right hand, or under the dryer drum. Usually, an easy way to determine is by the location of the lint screen filter. If the filter is on top of the dryer, the heating circuits are in the back of the dryer. If the lint screen is in the door, the heating circuits are located under the dryer drum.

On a Whirlpool Duet or Kenmore Elite model, the heating circuits are located inside the dryer under the dryer drum on the right hand side. You will need to remove the lower toe panel under the door to access. The toe panel comes off by locating and removing the screws under the bottom front edge of the panel. The Heating Element is located inside a heater box. The Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) will be located on the outside of the heater box on the end opposite the heating element terminals (all the way towards the back of the dryer cabinet). The Hi-Limit Thermostat will be located adjacent to the heating element terminals.

NOTE: If either the TCO or Hi-Limit Thermostat are determined to be bad, replace BOTH components at the same time. That is why these components are commonly sold as a set. Failure to do so may result in premature failure of any parts you replace.

Replacement parts can be purchased at any of the following websites:

searspartsdirect.com
pcappliancerepair.com
appliancepartspros.com
repairclinic.com

The first three sites listed also have helpful exploded view parts illustrations that you can use to locate and properly identify any parts you may need. If you have questions, or require additional assistance, please post back with a MODEL NUMBER and let me know. I hope this helps you.



NOTE: If your model number is not listed on some of the websites, use the part numbers from the Sears website and use that as your search criteria. Some model numbers will not reference on some sites, but the part numbers will.

Apr 25, 2011 | Kenmore Dryers

1 Answer

Which part on the heating unit most commonly fails on a Kenmore Elite Dryer? Mine no longer heats.


If your dryer still runs, but does NOT heat, the following two links can give you advice on how to troubleshoot an ELECTRIC dryer with a no heat problem:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3576548-dryer_runs_but_does_not_heat

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3574266-thorough_dryer_advice


Your problem may or may not be related to a heating element problem as there are numerous factors that can cause a dryer not to heat. The most common fail item is a blown Thermal Cut-Out (TCO). However, you need to perform a routine inspection of the dryer and components to be sure.

First, begin by unplugging the dryer and verifying the voltage at the wall receptacle. You should read 220-240VAC across the two Hot terminals (left and right slots). If the voltage is incorrect, check to make sure you don't have a breaker tripped. Some homes use 2 separate 120VAC breakers to provide power to the receptacle vice using one 240VAC breaker.

If the voltage IS correct, leave the dryer unplugged and remove the cover plate on the terminal block in the back of the dryer (this is where the power cord is installed). Plug the dryer back in and take a voltage reading across the two hot (RED and BLACK) wires at the terminal block. You should read 220-240VAC. If the voltage is good, you have an internal heating problem. If the voltage is bad at the terminal block, but good at the receptacle, you have a bad power cord.

NOTE: If the wires at the terminal block are not color coded, the outer two wires (left and right) are the hot leads. The center conductor is neutral or ground.

The reason a dryer will still run if the input voltage is incorrect, is because the drive motor only uses a portion of the 220 service. The motor runs off 110-120VAC, while the heating circuits require 220-240VAC. So, if you are missing 1/2 your input voltage due to a tripped breaker or bad power cord, your dryer may exhibit these symptoms.

If you determine the problem to be internal, the heating circuits will either be located in the rear of the dryer on the right hand, or under the dryer drum on the right hand side. Usually, an easy way to determine is by the location of the lint screen filter. If the filter is on top of the dryer, the heating circuits are in the back of the dryer. If the lint screen is in the door, the heating circuits are located under the dryer drum.

NOTE: On a Whirlpool Duet or Kenmore Elite model, the heating circuits are located inside the dryer under the dryer drum on the right hand side. You will need to remove the lower toe panel under the door to access. The toe panel comes off by locating and removing the screws under the bottom front edge of the panel.

The Heating Element is located inside a heater box. The Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) will be located on the outside of the heater box on the end opposite the heating element terminals. The Hi-Limit Thermostat will be located adjacent to the heating element terminals.

If either the TCO or Hi-Limit Thermostat are determined to be bad, replace BOTH components at the same time. That is why these components are commonly sold as a set. Failure to do so may result in premature failure of any parts you replace.

Replacement parts (if required) may be found at the following websites:

searspartsdirect.com
pcappliancerepair.com
appliancepartspros.com
repairclinic.com

The average cost of these components varies, so shop and compare. The first three websites I listed have helpful exploded view parts diagrams that can help you locate and properly identify any parts you may need. The heating components are usually listed under the "Bulkhead" section.

NOTE: In many cases the problem is not the heating element. The heating element has protection devices that are designed to regulate the heat and internal temperatures. If the dryer overheats the Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) typically will blow BEFORE the heating element. The replacement kit is much cheaper than purchasing a new heating element that may or may not be the problem.

Read through the information I provided and, if you have any questions, please post back and let me know. I hope you find this information is helpful.

NOTE: If your model number is not listed on some of the websites, use the part numbers from the Sears website and use that as your search criteria. Some model numbers will not reference on some sites, but the part numbers will.

Repairclinic.com has a repair manual that you can purchase that will also help repair any Whirlpool manufactured gas or electric dryer. The part number is 1159257.

Jul 13, 2010 | Kenmore Elite 45986 Front Load Washer

1 Answer

Dryer doesn't heat


The problem may not be the heating element. The following link explains how to troubleshoot a dryer no heat problem:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r630242-dryer_runs_but_not_heat

First, begin by unplugging the dryer and verifying the voltage at the wall receptacle. You should read 220-240VAC across the two Hot terminals (left and right slots). If the voltage is incorrect, check to make sure you don't have a breaker tripped. Some homes use 2 separate 120VAC breakers to provide power to the receptacle vice using one 240VAC breaker.

If the voltage IS correct, leave the dryer unplugged and remove the cover plate on the terminal block in the back of the dryer (this is where the power cord is installed). Plug the dryer back in and take a voltage reading across the two hot (RED and BLACK) wires at the terminal block. You should read 220-240VAC. If the voltage is good, you have an internal heating problem. If the voltage is bad at the terminal block, but good at the receptacle, you have a bad power cord.

The reason a dryer will still run if the input voltage is incorrect, is because the drive motor only uses a portion of the 220 service. The motor runs off 110-120VAC, while the heating circuits require 220-240VAC. So, if you are missing 1/2 your input voltage due to a tripped breaker or bad power cord, your dryer will exhibit these symptoms.

If you determine the problem to be internal, the heating circuits will either be located in the rear of the washer on the right hand, or under the dryer drum on the right hand side. Usually, an easy way to determine is by the location of the lint screen filter. If the filter is on top of the dryer, the heating circuits are in the back of the dryer. If the lint screen is in the door, the heating circuits are located under the dryer drum. All Kenmore dryers are not constructed the the same. Regardles of location, the Heating Element is located inside the heater box. The Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) will be located on the outside of the heater box on the end opposite the heating element terminals. The Hi-Limit Thermostat will be located adjacent to the heating element terminals. If either the TCO or Hi-Limit Thermostat are determined to be bad, replace both components at the same time. That is why these components are commonly sold as a set. Failure to do so may result in premature failure of any parts you replace. All these parts can be found at appliancepartspros.com, searspartsdirect.com, pcappliancerepair.com, or repairclinic.com.

If you have any questions, please let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.

Aug 10, 2009 | Kenmore 60172 Electric Commercial Dryer

1 Answer

My kenmore series 80 electric dryer does not heat. I am replacing the TCO, but it does not appear to be hooked up. There are red wires going directly into the heating element, but the TCO lead is...


Yes, hook it up, but before you do that Vacuumn every piece of lint out of the cabinet. Also check TCO and check the thermostats for continuity. They should all read zero ohms.If one of them is open, replace it.

Also use your ohmmeter to check the heating element, It should not show an open condition.

Jul 29, 2009 | Kenmore 63942 Dryer

1 Answer

Kenmore 70 series model 110-66752500


The following link explains how to troubleshoot a dryer not heat problem:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r630242-dryer_runs_but_not_heat

Begin by verifying the wall receptacle for the proper voltage. If the voltage is not reading between 220-240VAC, this will also give you the same symptoms.

Cleaning out the lint is a good start, but if the lint has accumulated over a period of time, the dryer may have overheated. This usually results in the thermal cut-out (TCO) blowing. The TCO acts as a fuse and once it blows, it must be replaced. Your heating element will be located in the heater box on the right hand side of the dryer with the back panel removed. The TCO will be located at the top end of the heater box, while the hi-limit thermostat will be located adjacent to the ceramic heating element terminals. If the TCO proves to be faulty, replace the TCO and Hi-Limit Thermostat at the same time. The two components are usually sold as a set as part number 279816. You can find these parts at searspartdirect.com or appliancepartspros.com under the "Bulkhead Parts" section as item number 1. Just use you model number for your search criteria. Failure to replace both parts may result in premature failure of any replaced components.

Read through the link provided and let me know if you have any questions. Pay particular attention to the section that discusses proper dryer ventilation. If kept in a clogged condition, the dryer will continue to overheat to the point of failure. Not to mention, this is a fire hazard. I hope this helps you.

Jun 01, 2009 | Kenmore 63942 Dryer

1 Answer

No Heat


First and foremost, make sure you have the dryer correctly wired. The following link explains how to properly wire a 3 and 4 prong power cord:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r793520-3_prong_4_prong_power_cord_conversion

If you have the dryer correctly wired, double check the voltage at the wall receptacle to ensure you have 220-240VAC across the two hot leads. That would be the two large (left and right) slots in the receptacle. If the source voltage is good, the following link explains how to troubleshoot a dryer no heat problem:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r630242-dryer_runs_but_not_heat

The majority of dryer heat related problems are caused by poor air flow. This is caused by clogged or poorly installed dryer vent ducting. A dryer needs proper air flow in order to work efficiently. Without proper upkeep on the vent ducting, it can become clogged, causing the dryer to overheat to the point of failure. Most commonly, the thermal cut-out (TCO) fails. The TCO acts as a fuse. When it trips, it cannot be reset and must be replaced. If you determine the TCO to be defective, it is recommended that you replace the hi-limit thermostat at the same time. These components are often sold as a set. Failure to replace both components can result in premature failure.

Read through the information I provided and let me know if you have any questions. I hope this helps you.

May 03, 2009 | Kenmore 3.8 cu. ft. HE3 Front Load Washer

1 Answer

Dryer will not start.


The TCO for your dryer is located behind the lower front panel under the door. The panel can be removed by inserting a putty knife in the top seam where the panel meets the front cabinet about 2 inches in from each side. There are two retaining clips that you need to depress with the putty knife to remove the panel. Once the panel is removed, locate the heater box on the right hand side under the drum. The TCO and hi-limit thermostat are located on the left hand side of the heat box, with the TCO being the component located farthest to the REAR of the dryer. There are drawings available at searspartsdirect.com or appliancepartspros.com to assist you. Simply type in your COMPLETE model number (inlcude the "110." prefix) and you will find the heating circuits located under the "Bulkhead" heading.

Now...if your dryer is not starting, the TCO probably isn't the cause. The TCO, if bad, will only affect the heating circuits. More commonly, the THERMAL FUSE is a likely suspect if the dryer fails to start. It is located as item number 59 under the "Bulkhead" section and is installed on the air blower housing directly under the drum. Make sure you UNPLUG the dryer before servicing. Dangerous voltages are still present even with the dryer turned off. Make sure you disconnect the wire leads to make any resistance checks to rule out false readings caused by parallel paths. The Thermal Fuse should read close to a short if good.

The following link can provide you with more assistance with isolating your problem (if needed):

http://www.fixya.com/support/r385301-thorough_dryer_advice

If you have questions, or require additional assistance, please let me know. I hope this helps you.

Jan 13, 2009 | Kenmore 63942 Dryer

1 Answer

Kenmore Series 70 Stopped heating up


Dryers have a thermal cut-out (TCO) that can trip in an overheat condition. Yes, it is possible to restrict air flow from clogged lint and cause this overheat condition. The TCO acts as a fuse and cannot be reset. If defective, it must be replaced. Here is a link that also explains other causes of dryer heat related failures:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r630242-dryer_runs_but_not_heat

Now...normally if there is heating circuit failure, such as the TCO or heating element, the dryer drum will still rotate. The dryer just does not heat. If this is not your symptom, you may have another cause to your failure. This next link, provides more detailed symptom elaboration:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r385301-thorough_dryer_advice

Pay particular attention to the sections in these links that discuss proper dryer ventilation. Poor air flow is the number one cause of dryer failures and dryer fires.

What is your model number? This will determine how your dryer is configured and where the heating components are located. If you have further questions, please let me know. I hope this helps you.

Jan 13, 2009 | Kenmore 22422 Top Load Washer

1 Answer

Kenmore Electric Dryer


If this is a Kenmore, have you checked the thermal cut-out or high-limit thermstat? Does the drum turn when you start the dryer?

If the drum turns, but does not heat, you will need to check the thermal cut-out (located on the heating element housing). The TCO should read a SHORT (0 ohms) or very low resistance. If it is OPEN, replace it along with the high-limit thermostat. In most cases the two components are sold as a set and are recommended to replaced as a set by the manufacturer.

Reason: The TCO is designed to protect the heating element and thermostat in the event of an overtemp condition. If the TCO is bad, there's a likely chance that the thermostat could be damaged.

If the TCO reads good, you may have a thermostat that is failing. The high limit thermostat operates normally in the CLOSED (shorted) position and will OPEN at or around 157 degrees F. It is located on the heating element housing adjacent to the TCO. If the thermostat has failed the dryer will tumble, but will not heat. Follow the same recommendation as for replacement of the TCO. Replace both components as a set.

Now...if the dryer drum does not spin, the likely cause is the thermal FUSE. It will be mounted on the blower housing near the blower fan. It is usually white (plastic) in color on Kenmore models. It should read a SHORT. If it fails the dryer will not spin or heat.

Post back with your comments or questions. I hope I'm leading you in the right direction.

Jan 15, 2008 | LG WD-14124RD Front Load Washer / Dryer

1 Answer

Kenmore Dryer works for about 20 MINUTES, not seconds


SD, doesn't sound like the same problem. Yours sounds more the like motor kicking out on overload and when it cools down you are able to start it again. The thermal fuse and high limit TCO are non resettable so you can rule them out. You are going to have to check some things out. Make sure the rollers and pulley are not binding. The blower wheel is not binding. These things will cause a drag on the drum and put a heavy load on the motor. Catriver...post back

Feb 12, 2007 | Kenmore 64902 Electric Dryer

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