Question about Vizio VX32L Television

1 Answer

Red pixels on white images on screen

Hi The screen will have red moving pixels on white and light colored images. the factory tech had me unplug for 5 min then enter menue and reset all settings which did not help. Any ideas? Thanks

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Vizio Master
  • 5,568 Answers

This sounds like the digital equivalent of 'snow,' a random noise that can come from poor signal quality or poor or not firmly attached cables. I'd try exchanging the cable that is now in place from whatever signal source you have (cable/cable box, satellite receiver, etc.) with another either new or temporarily borrowed one from another device. 
If this doesn't help, consider the other modern devices you have in your home such as light dimmers, fluorescent bulbs, digital clocks, home theatre equipment, etc. Pull the plug on any of those, one at a time and observe the TV to see if any of them are affecting it. Those named items are common sources of high frequency noise that can contribute to the kind of problem you are having. They have gotten better but can still produce unwanted sources of interference signals.  

Posted on Oct 25, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Principle of lcd


Liquid Crystal Display - LCD
There is a Flo recent light that shines behind the screen. This light is what passes through the window or LCD when the shades are open or partly opened.
Think of each colored individual LCD (pixel) as a Window Shade. You have pixels that are made up of 1-red, 1- green and 1-blue light shade.
Your main control board will tell each light shade how much/far to open each colored light shade so it will make the color it needs to.
If the shades are closed (black) if the shades are all open (white)
Hope this helps.

May 24, 2012 | Sony BRAVIA KDL-40S2010 40 in. LCD...

Tip

How to fix a dead or stuck pixel on an LCD screen


A dead or stuck pixel on an LCD screen or TFT can be incredibly annoying. You'll be staring at it for days on end, wondering for how long you'll be without your screen or maybe your entire laptop if you decided to turn it in for repair or replacement. All that grieve over something as unimportant, yet highly irritating as a malfunctioning pixel.<br /> Before you run the item back to the store though, you should try to see whether you can fix it yourself! This, if done carefully, will not hamper your warranty and might save you a lot of time and worries. So let's see what you can do yourself.<br /> Let me say that any new LCD or TFT monitor should be tested for pixel errors. This can be done simply by running it through a palette of basic colors and black and white in full screen mode. The software, which we'll get to in a second, can do that.<br /> First let me explain what you may be seeing. Is it just a stuck pixel or is it in fact dead? A stuck pixel will appear in any of the colors that its three subpixels (red, green and blue) can form, depending on their functionality and brightness. In a dead pixel all subpixels are permanently off, which will make the pixel appear black. This may result from a broken transistor, in rare cases however even a black pixel may just be stuck. So if you're seeing a colored or white pixel, your chances are pretty good and if it's black, there is still hope.<br /> Let's turn to the software now. If you're not on Windows, scroll down for some online tools!<br /> <b><a href="http://udpix.free.fr/">UDPixel</a> (Windows)</b> I recommend UDPixel to quickly identify and fix pixels using a single tool. The program requires .NET Framework 2.<br /> <p><img src="fixpixel02.png" /> With the dead pixel locator on the left you can easily detect any screen irregularity that may have escaped your vision until now. Should you have identified a suspicious pixel, switch to the undead pixel option, create sufficient amounts of flash windows (one per stuck pixel) and hit start. You can drag the tiny flashing windows to where you found the pixel in question. Let it run for a while and eventually change the flash interval.<br /> <b><a href="http://flexcode.org/lcd.html">LCD</a> (online)</b> This is one tool that lets you find and eventually fix stuck pixels. It packs many options into a singly tiny window, but once you have an overview it's straightforward and easy to use.<br /> <p><img src="fixpixel06.png" /> To test the screen click the small 'pick a color' box. The colors you should test are red, green and blue. Additionally you should test white and black. Follow the instructions in the box to gain the best results.<br /> <b><a href="http://tft.vanity.dk/">Online Monitor Test</a> (Online)</b> This is a very thorough test not only meant to identify bad pixels, but also powerful enough to test the quality of your monitor. You can choose between three different modes to test your monitor. This tool either requires flash (online version) or it can be installed in the executable mode.<br /> <p><img src="fixpixel03.png" /> What you will need to just test for stuck pixels is the HTML window. Toggle full screen by hitting F11. What you will see is displayed below.<br /> <p><img src="fixpixel04.png" /> Move the mouse to the top of the test window and a menu will appear. There is an info window that you can turn off with a button in the top right of the menu. Then click on the homogenity test point and move through the three colors as well as black and white. Fingers crossed you won't discover anything out of the ordinary. In the unfortunate case that you do, you may find the following online tool helpful.<br /> <b><a href="http://www.jscreenfix.com/basic.php">JScreenFix</a> (Online)</b> Alternatively, and if you're not using Windows XP, you can use the online tool JScreenFix which launches a Java applet to fix stuck pixel.<br /> <p><img src="fixpixel05.png" /> The tool launches a small applet in a separate browser window and you can drag the window to the respective spot or run it in full screen.<br /> Hands On (Offline) Should none of these tools resolve your pixel issue, there is one last chance. You can combine any of the tools and the magic power of your own hands. There is a very good description of all available techniques on <a href="http://www.wikihow.com/Fix-a-Stuck-Pixel-on-an-LCD-Monitor">wikiHow</a>. Another great step by step guide can be found on <a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Fix-a-stuck-pixel-on-an-LCD-monitor/">instructables</a>.<br /> But let's go through one technique real quick:<br /> <ol> <li>Turn off your monitor.</li> <li>Get yourself a damp cloth, so that you won't scratch the screen.</li> <li>Apply pressure to the area where the stuck pixel is. Try not to put pressure anywhere else, as this may trigger the creation of more stuck pixels.</li> <li>While applying pressure, turn on your computer and screen.</li> <li>Remove pressure and the stuck pixel should be gone.</li></ol> This works because in a stuck pixel liquid in a subpixel has not spread equally. In combination with the backlight of your screen, this liquid is used to allow different amounts of light to pass through, which creates the different colors.<br /> Should all of these approaches fail to fix your pixel warrior, at least you'll now know it's not simple to fix and the LCD may indeed need to be replaced. But please do let us know if these tips helped you to fix your pixels. In any case, good luck!

on Jan 04, 2011 | Sony KDF-E55A20 55 in. LCD Television

1 Answer

Whats the difference between a LCD and plasma


Answer: Outward appearances are definitely deceiving when it comes to LCD and Plasma televisions. Although both types of televisions are flat and thin, they employ different technology in an attempt to deliver similar results. Plasma TV Overview Plasma television technology is based loosely on the fluorescent light bulb. The display itself consists of cells. Within each cell two glass panels are separated by a narrow gap in which neon-xenon gas is injected and sealed in plasma form during the manufacturing process. The gas is electrically charged at specific intervals when the Plasma set is in use. The charged gas then strikes red, green, and blue phosphors, thus creating a television image. Each group of red, green, and blue phosphors is called a pixel (picture element). Although Plasma television technology eliminate the need for the bulky picture tube and electron beam scanning of traditional televisions, because it still employs the burning of phosphors to generate an image, Plasma televisions still suffer from some of the drawbacks of traditional televisions, such as heat generation and screen-burn of static images. LCD TV Overview LCD televisions, on the other hand, use a different technology (see also question #1 for this same explanation). Basically, LCD panels are made of two layers of transparent material, which are polarized, and are "glued" together. One of the layers is coated with a special polymer that holds the individual liquid crystals. Current is then passed through individual crystals, which allow the crystals to pass or block light to create images. LCD crystals do not produce their own light, so an external light source, such as florescent bulb is needed for the image created by the LCD to become visible to the viewer. Unlike standard CRT and Plasma televisions, since there are no phosphors that light up, less power is needed for operation and the light source in an LCD television generates less heat than a Plasma or traditional television. Also, because of the nature of LCD technology, there is no radiation emitted from the screen itself. Plasma vs LCD The ADVANTAGES of Plasma over LCD are: 1. Larger screen size availability. 2. Better contrast ratio and ability to render deeper blacks. 3. Better color accuracy and saturation. 4. Better motion tracking (little or no motion lag in fast moving images). The DISADVANTAGES of Plasma vs LCD include: 1. Plasma TVs are more susceptible to burn-in of static images. 2. Plasma TVs generate more heat than LCDs, due to the need to light of phosphors to create the images. 3. Does not perform as well at higher altitudes. 4. Potentially shorter display life span - this used to be the case. Early Plasmas had 30,000 hours or 8 hrs of viewing a day for 9 years, which was less than LCD. However, screen life span has now improved and 60,000 hour life span rating are now common, with some sets rated as high as 100,000 hours, due to technology improvements. LCD television ADVANTAGES over Plasma include: 1. No burn-in of static images. 2. Cooler running temperature. 3. No high altitude use issues. 4. Increased image brightness over Plasma. 5. Lighter weight (when comparing same screen sizes) than Plasma counterparts. 6. Longer display life used to be a factor, but now LCD and Plasma sets both have at least 60,000 hour or higher lifespans. DISADVANTAGES of LCD vs Plasma televisions include: 1. Lower contrast ratio, not as good rendering deep blacks. 2. Not as good at tracking motion (fast moving objects may exhibit lag artifacts) - However, this is improving with the recent implementation of 120Hz screen refresh rates and 240Hz processing in higher-end LCD sets. 3. Not as common in large screen sizes above 42-inches as Plasma. However, the number is growing fast, with 46 and 47-inch screen sizes becoming more common, and some LCD sets having a screen size as large as 65-inches also available to the general public. 4. Although LCD televisions do not suffer from burn-in susceptibility, it is possible that individual pixels on an LCD televisions can burn out, causing small, visible, black or white dots to appear on the screen. Individual pixels cannot be repaired, the whole screen would need to be replaced at that point, if the individual pixel burnout becomes annoying to you. 5. LCD televisions are typically more expensive than equivalent-sized Plasma televisions (although this is changing), especially when comparing EDTV Plasmas to HDTV-LCD Televisions. For a more detailed look at the LCD and Plasma comparison, check out: Should I Buy an LCD or Plasma Television?

Jan 18, 2010 | Panasonic TH-42PWD6UY 42 in. HD-Ready...

3 Answers

I have a LG plasma 42PC1D (4 years old). For the


I had the same problem a few months after buying the TV, called LG and they sent a tech to replace two boards in the tv. No further problems since.

Dec 21, 2009 | LG 42PC3D 42 in. Plasma Television

1 Answer

Black line half way down the center of the screen,about 1.5 inche


There's a 'data control' and/or 'address' problem that's developed. Pixels depend on voltage, control, and data coming too their designated address.

A digital circuit feature called a 'DATA_ADDRESS_ BUS" are responsible for 3 criteria: Delivering voltage, control, and data to each pixel in less than a second.

1) If voltage fails the pixels don't light up. They appear black in color (their 'off 'state)....numerous pixels that don't light up look like a black line. But their actually individual pixels with no voltage.

2) If control fails then all pixels are white in color (their 'on' state). Without control the pixels can't adjust properly to high or low 'state', meaning brightness and dimness. This looks like a white line vertically on the screen.

3) If data fails then the pixels can't adjust to the proper color at the proper time.
This appears as a line that changes color out of sync with the entire picture.


Have a technician look at the pixel address registry circuits. As well as control and linear circuits....the problem is somewhere in there!

Jun 13, 2009 | Toshiba 42HP83 42 in. HD-Ready Plasma...

1 Answer

Pixeled picture, Red color, blurry and smeared images


Ghost image and snowy colorful pixelation with vertical black bars? You can try a hard reset by unplugging the unit completely for 4 hours. However you may have a prob with the YSUS and the YBU-L (YBuffer Upper-Lower.) Perhaps even the Logic Main may be defective. If you are still under warranty take it to a service center ASAP. If not Get out your Voltometer. You can email me for some help...

gysgt2u1@yahoo

May 08, 2009 | Philips Flat Panel Televisions

1 Answer

Pixels aren't refreshing correctly in upper right hand side of screen


You might have a Service Co. come out and look at it. It sounds like the Z module is not doing it's job of erasing all prior images after a scene change. Some models there are adjustments for that internally. ( only for a tech ) Start a paper trail now.

Apr 28, 2009 | Flat Panel Televisions

3 Answers

Black shows upas darkred, If image is on screen bright red pixels


sounds like a signal processing problem (AD converter) , posibly a bad voltage referance in the input circuit.

Dec 05, 2008 | Flat Panel Televisions

1 Answer

Pink highlights on LCD screen


IT SOUNDS LIKE THE MAIN BOARD IS BAD. THERE IS 2 DIFFERENT VERSIONS FOR THIS SET .AM02 UNITS OR VERSION 0001 UNITS. THE PART NUMBER IS BN94-00695E. THEY BOTH ARE ABOUT $210 + $50 CORE.
DON..


Jun 02, 2008 | Flat Panel Televisions

1 Answer

Color has too much red


Is this happening when you are switching between color tempature (Normal,Warm, and Cool). You wont be able to access it in normal menu.
You will have to accesss the service tech menu. enter "062596 then info", if u enter the code correct at bottom of screen you will see a warning menu only access by a service tech , continue in menu you will see on main option screen "alignment" enter this. Go to white point adjust the three temp settings (Normal, Warm, and Cool) settings as follows.
Color Temp. I Red I Green I Blue I

Cool 122 120 121

Normal 125 118 108

Warm 127 110 75
( These are factory specs u can tweak them to your own perference)

After u set these press left on remote and exit back to main service menu and store these setting before turning TV off set these settings

I see this alot when Philips manufactured the TV. The did store the settings.

Jan 22, 2008 | Philips 50PFP5332D 50 in. Plasma...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Vizio VX32L Television Logo

259 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Vizio Flat Panel Televisions Experts

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

68157 Answers

Dave Naylor
Dave Naylor

Level 3 Expert

834 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17129 Answers

Are you a Vizio Flat Panel Television Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...