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Heater blowing cool air

I have a Carrier 50HX single packaged heat pump unit. The thermostat is showing way below the set temperature. The pump is running but blowing cool air instead of warm. It runs all day because it never gets up to the correct temperature. The thermostat is showing that it is on the heat setting. Any ideas of what his can be, Thanks

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  • Patrick Cockwell Feb 20, 2012

    Thanks for your help, we used to be getting warm air coming from the vents, never hot but warm. But in the last month or so it's been cool air. We have not changed anything.

  • Patrick Cockwell Feb 20, 2012

    Also, the thermostat I have is a Hunter 44132.

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  • Heating & Co... Master
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Is it set on summer switch which is the fan running all the time blowing cold air

Posted on Feb 18, 2012

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SOURCE: My Cozy heater does not respond on the thermostat control

Make sure you have a stat that is for a millivolt system, if the stat you have has 24v on it wrong one, need to purchase at a heating wholesaler home depot lowes do not carry them.The stat should have mv for millivolts on the box or stat.

Posted on Nov 24, 2010

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When the heater is on, should the fan outside on top of the unit also be working along with the blower from the heater ? When the heater is off, cold air is comming from the vent's, can I cover the


No. This is strictly a gas package unit, not a heat pump. the condenser fan motor should NOT run when their is a call for heat from the thermostat. The condenser fan only runs with the compressor on a call for cooling. Hopefully the compressor is not running @ the same time, but if it is, it would make sense that the contactor for the compressor & condenser fan motor is stuck closed OR the low voltage cooling wires are shorted straight to a 24Volt control wire.

Jan 15, 2015 | Carrier Heating & Cooling

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Thermostat wiring terminals and colors


R - The R terminal is the power for the thermostat. This comes from the transformer usually located in the blower section for split systems but you may find the transformer in the condensing unit. For this reason, it is a good idea to kill the power at the condensing unit and the blower section before changing or working on the wiring at the thermostat. If you have a package unit then the transformer is in the package unit.
Red for the R terminal.

RC - The RC terminal is designated for the power for cooling. Some HVAC systems use two transformers. A transformer for cooling and a transformer for heating. In this case the power from the transformer in the blower section would go to the thermostat terminal. It should be noted that a jumper can be installed between RC and RH for a heating and cooling system equipped with a single transformer.
Red for RC terminal.

RH - The RH terminal is designated for the power for heating. See RC above for an explanation. It should be noted that a jumper can be installed between RC and RH for a heating and cooling system equipped with a single transformer.

Y - This is the terminal for cooling or air conditioning and goes to the compressor relay. Typically a thermostat wire pull is made to the air handler on split systems and then this wire is spliced for the separate wire pull which is made to the condenser. Some manufacturers put a terminal board strip near the control board in the air handler so a splice is not needed.
Yellow for Y Terminal.

Y2 - This is the thermostat terminal for cooling second stage if your system is so equipped. Many systems only have a single compressor but if you have two compressors which should only operate off of one thermostat then you need the Y2 thermostat terminal for second stage cooling.
*The most common color I've seen used for this terminal and wire designation is light blue but this varies and is completely up to the installer what color to use. Most installers use the color coding as noted but be aware that some do not use the thermostat color coding.

W - This is the thermostat terminal for heating. This wire should go directly to the heating source whether it be a gas or oil furnace, electric furnace, or boiler,
White for W Terminal.

W2 - This is the thermostat terminal used for second stage heat. There are gas furnaces with low fire and high fire and some depend on control from a two-stage heating thermostat with a W2 terminal. Heat Pumps use staging for auxiliary heat and need a W2 terminal.
*The most common color I've seen used for this terminal and wire designation is brown but this varies and is completely up to the installer what color to use.

G - This is the thermostat terminal used for the fan relay to energize the indoor blower fan. On a split system the blower fan is in the blower section while with a package unit the blower fan is in the outdoor package unit.

Green for G Terminal.

C - This is the thermostat terminal which originates from the transformer and is necessary to complete the 24 volts power circuit in the thermostat but only if the thermostat consumes electricity for power. Many digital thermostats require 24 volts for power so the common wire is necessary.
C stands for common and there is no universal color used for this terminal although black is the most common color I've seen.

O or B - These thermostat terminals are for heat pumps and the B thermostat terminal is used on for Rheem or Ruud and any manufacturer that energizes the reversing valve in heating mode for the heat pump. Most other manufacturers of heat pumps will utilize the reversing valve for cooling and the O thermostat terminal will be utilized for this purpose. This wire goes to outside heat pump condenser where the reversing valve is located.

Orange for O and Dark Blue for B depending on the installer of the heat pump and the manufacturer. If you have a Trane, Carrier, Goodman, Lennox, Ducane, Heil, Fedders, Amana, Janitrol, or any other manufacturer other than Rheem or Ruud you will be utilizing the orange wire for reversing valve. Rheem and Ruud will usually utilize the blue wire for reversing valve.

E - This thermostat terminal is for heat pumps and stands for Emergency Heating. If for whatever reason the heat pump condenser fails and it is necessary to run the heat there is an option on heat pump thermostats for emergency heating. Basically this simply utilizes the back-up heat source many heat pumps have to heat the home without sending a signal to the condenser to run for heat.

E - There is no universal color used for this thermostat terminal designation but this should be wired directly to the heating relay or the E terminal on a terminal strip board in the air handler or package unit if you have a heat pump package unit.

X or Aux - This thermostat terminal is for back-up on a heat pump and allows for auxiliary heating from the back-up heat source usually located in the air handler.

X or Aux - There is no universal color used for this thermostat terminal designation but this should be wired directly to the heating relay or the Aux terminal on a terminal strip board in the air handler or package unit if you have a heat pump package unit.

S1 & S2 or Outdoor 1 and Outdoor 2 - Some thermostats have this terminal and it used for an outdoor temperature sensor. The wire uses for this should be special shielded wire and completely separate form the other thermostat wires.







on Jun 06, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

Tip

Lux Thermostat 500


The Lux 500 Thermostat is an affordable programmable thermostat that gives you a very easy way to customize your heating and cooling temperatures to your schedule. The programming of this thermostat is easily the simplest that I have found in a programmable t-stat.

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The Lux 500 series thermostats are a great economical way to reduce energy and utility expenses by raising or lowering your temperature settings a the times you set. The installation is so easy that most any DIY’er can install this thermostat. It has an easy to read display and the rotary dial makes the programming very user friendly.

A few of the other great features of this unit are, a keyboard lockout, and an air filter reminder.

This thermostat can be used on any 24v AC or 750mV single stage conventional heating/cooling system. Single stage heat pumps without auxiliary heat will also work with this thermostat.

Here is a summary of the features of this thermostat

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  • 5 - 2 Day programming
  • 4 Periods per day
  • Large easy-to-read display
  • LUX patented user-friendly Speed Dial®
  • Filter usage monitor and alert
  • Default Energy Star approved program
  • Temporary Temperature Override
  • Temperature Hold
  • Keyboard Lockout
  • Temperature Calibration
  • Swing Settings #1 - #9
  • Fahrenheit or Celsius temperature Scale
  • 12/24 Time Format
  • Low Battery Warning Indicator
  • Mercury Free


As you can see this thermostat will give you a lot of great features at an affordable price.

on Jan 16, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Unit blows cool air while in heat mode


model number? Heat pumps tend to blow cooler air than a space heater unless in money-gobbling mode.

Mar 28, 2014 | LG Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Carrier heat pump (basic model) runs at 0 or below


A basic model heat pump with an air handler with electric strip heat generally will continue to run with a call for heat regardless of the outdoor air temperature unless there was an outdoor thermostat (an accessory) installed. There is still heat in the outdoor even at temperatures of zero and below. Generally, there is a balance point of approx 30-35degF that allows the heat pump to heat your house to 68degF without the need for the electric heaters. Below that, the heat pump can still extract heat from outside and "pump" it into your house; however, it will need help from the electric heaters. In temperatures below the balance point, the heat pump will run non-stop. As the temperature in the house falls approx 1 - 2 degF below the setpoint, the electric heaters will energize. So it is not uncommon for the system to run non-stop with the temperature falling a few degrees below setpoint. The colder the outside temperature, the more often the strip heaters will cycle on/off. If your system is well-maintained and operating at proper performance, it is still cheaper to run your heat pump than it is to run on straight electric heat. If you live in a climate where below zero temperatures are normal during the winter months, you might want to research heat pump options that offer higher COP's and increased performance in colder temperature than the basic contractor's model. Start with initiating communication with a local contractor. You will need to consider initial cost and the pay-back period based on your local energy costs and your specific demands you want your system to meet.

Hope this helps!

Feb 14, 2010 | Carrier 38CKC036 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

No heat when outside temp low When outside temp is 38 or above get heat. Is there a heater in the compressor that can fail?


I would start with your outdoor thermostat located in
the unit outside. I`m assuming this is a heat pump.
When the outdoor temthermostat is set to say 40F
anything lower than that and you are not using the
compressor, you are using electric heat thats located
in the air handler unit in the house.

I`m also assuming this is a split system and not a
packaged unit. If you are mechanically inclined and
you can locate the outdoor thermostat lower it below
the outdoor air temp and see if the unit comes on.

Sounds like you might have a problem with your electric heat or emergency heat

Jan 12, 2010 | Carrier XQB101D Air Conditioner

3 Answers

Uotside unit blowing cool air but hot on the inside


It sounds like you have a unit called a heat pump. When a heat pump unit is in cooling mode the outside unit blows hot air and the inside unit blows cold air. If the outside unit is blowing cold then the indoor unit is most likely blowing room temperature or warm air. It sounds like the thermostat could be controlling incorrectly or you could have a failed reversing valve which is the device that switches the unit from heating to cooling mode.

May 31, 2009 | Ruud UBHC Air Conditioner

2 Answers

My air handler comes on ,not the outside unit when my thermostat is in the off position even if i turn the thermostat down to 50 and have it turned off the air handler comes on for about 5 to 10 minutes...


If you have a standard thermostat the fan switch is for the air handler only. It completely over rides the thermostat for most settings. Now lets see this is what I'd expect:
fan switch on Indoor fan runs all time
Fan switch auto Indoor fan only runs when thermostat is set to cool or heat and the thermostat is turned up above room temp for heat or below room temp for cooling. In both of these modes the furnace blower comes on and stays on til the room temperature is satisfied. The outdoor unit only comes on for AC the out door unit will not come on for heat or the "on" setting on the thermostat. See exception 1 & 2 below...

Exception 1- (in a heat pump the out door unit runs in both heat and cool mode unless it has emergency heat turned on then it will not come on outside in the heat mode, and depending on the type of heat pump and furnace or air handler it is). A heat pump thermostat usually has "backup heat" and an "emergency heat" setting switch on the thermostat.
Exception 2 - On some thermostats they are made to cycle on the heat if the temperature reaches a preset temp (around 50'f usually but definitely by 40'f). This mode prevents freezing when if instance the homeowner is away or while the home is under construction. In this mode the fan inside can run but the heat usually comes on with it.
Exception3 - On some electric furnaces the heating strips may be individually controlled and thus not all come on at one time. This may give the feel of no heat especially if the room is cold.

Now there may be other exceptions but Ive tried to give you a heads up on some of the most common ones.
If you need more help please post more specifics about your unit/system as to for sure what switches are set to what setting and what is happening with each. My first though was that maybe your system is OK and you needed to know if the thermostat was working properly.

If this helpd you understand your problem would you please give me as hifgh a mark as you can. Thnaks for using fixya and good luck.

Mar 28, 2009 | Carrier Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

Heat pump that just blows cool air


is the condenser operating? what is the outdoor temperature? A heat pump is a cooling system with a reverse gear, most reversing valves which make this possible fail to the heat mode so it is not likely to be the problem. You should have either gas or electric back-up heat. If you switch to emergency heat do you get warm air? Really need to find out more to make an informed guess at your problem, the simple stupid would be is the circuit breaker to the condensing unit possibly tripped or shut off?

Dec 18, 2008 | Honeywell Programmable Thermostat Heater

1 Answer

Goodman PHJK048 Heat Pump Package


ok...where to start.lol ....the thermostat is just a switch.It will tell the unit to run or not run.if you measure the temp with the heatpump running,the air is warmer than 68 but it feels cool to you because your body is 98.6.The unit will run more often and for longer periods when the temperature drops outside for a few reasons.First,your house has more of a load to heat,meaning you have more heat loss because of the difference in temperatures outside and inside.Second,your heat pump pulls heat from the outside air.The colder the air outside,the less btu's for it to pull.If you have anymore questions hillbuck29@aol.com Hope this helps,Dave

Nov 10, 2008 | Goodman PHKJ048-1 Air Conditioner

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