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Down lights with transformers how to wire them into lighting circuit

I have just acquired downlights with transformers have been used but need advice about how to link them all and wire them into existing lighting circuit

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  • robbo 69 Oct 25, 2008

    i need the wiring diagram for the dimmable downlights with transformers

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125 VAC to the dimmer - dimmer output to Xfmr in - Xmfr out to lighting

Posted on Nov 23, 2008

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Humming halogens. I recently installed an electronic low voltage dimmer, 300watt DIVA, to my Kablelight system. I have 4 MR16- 12V- 50 watt bulbs. (200 watts total). When dimmed, the lights hum loudly. I...


Transformer hum with dimmers is a problem. Lutron may offer you an inductor to add to the wire to help. Replacing your 50w bulbs with 12w LED bulbs may help, too. Same light output.

May 06, 2014 | Dimmers

Tip

How to upgrade the under cabinet lighting in your kitchen.


Hello. Here is a great weekend project that anyone can succeed with. Under cabinet lighting is such an enhancement to the function and cheerfulness of your kitchen. My most recent experience with this was very successful. The kitchen really needed the extra light and, the home owner let me choose the fixtures. I selected Utilitech line Voltage Xenon Lights from Lowes. These units come in three lengths, 12", 18" and 24". They can operate alone or in groups, they use 110 volts and no transformers, and they have a high/lo/off dimmer switch built in. Finally, they can be installed using the enclosed plug-in cords, or direct wired, and you can link up to 600 watts. A twelve inch bar is 40 watts.

All of that said, all you need to proceed is about 45 minutes per cabinet, and the following tools: electric drill and a set of wood flat drill bits, flat head screwdriver, philips screwdriver, wire cutters, wire strippers, pliers, safety glasses and a small mirror. The mirror will assist you in tightening the screws as you install the fixtures under the cabinets. Turn off the power at the breaker for the circuit you are working on [unless of course you are going to use the plug in cords included in the box instead of direct wiring].

VERY USEFUL TIP: probably the most difficult part of this task could be mounting each of the light bars uniformly under the cabinets. Recognizing this, I made a template for each of the three lengths of fixture so that I knew exactly where to predrill and start the two mounting screws required per fixture. These templates were made from still cardboard, cut with a razor blade knife, although you could have used 1/4 inch plywood just as well.

on Dec 07, 2009 | Dimmers

1 Answer

Hi Ive got a Lutron Grafik Eye 3000 controlling


I need more information. Are the fixtures pot lights? What kind of bulbs are you using? Floodlights, spotlights, incondescent (normal tungsten filaments) or fluorescent, compact fluorescent, led etc. Since most dimmers say in their instructions that they are designed for incondescent lighting only the bulb you use can either blow up the switch or cause troubles like you are specifying. Also inside pot lights are thermal cutoffs that trip and reset when the light is cool again. Can you remove the switchplates and see where it says incondescent only embossed into the aluminum heatsink? If it says something else, what does it say?

Aug 01, 2013 | Lutron Dimmers

1 Answer

The transformer i have has a minimum wattage of 70 w and the maximum wattage of lights is 56w is this ok


Hi Richard,

I'm an electrician and can help you with this question. I'm not quite sure of your question as there is no mention of a dimmer - yet it is in the dimmer category. A transformer rated at 70W should be able to support 56W of lighting, as the lights represent 80% of the capacity of a 70W transformer. Your terminology is a bit unclear however.

Transformers are usually rated in VA, not watts - but if you've got one that says it is rated for 70 watts, this is generally the maximum power it will handle, NOT "minimum". I guess I would feel more comfortable knowing what the transformer is a part of and the type of lights / fixtures you're trying to use with it.

Some lamp types (fluorescent, and other types with a "ballast" or tansformer) are not supposed to be placed on a dimmer circuit - *unless* it is labeled specifically as usable on a dimmer circuit.

I am imagining that you are attempting to use a line voltage track and light fixtures that have a built-in transformer (making them low voltage lights really) on a dimmer, or some other arrangement whereby you "dim" the input of a transformer to control the brightness of the low voltage lights. Regardless of the wattage of the transformer or lights - doing so will create a fire hazard and should not be done. Transformers are designed to work at specific voltage and frequencies (60Hz) and should never be connected to a mismatched power source.

If I am missing your question, please provide a "bigger picture" of what you have and what you are trying to do.

I hope this helps & good luck!

Jan 10, 2013 | Dimmers

1 Answer

We have a lutron nova 2003p (1600 watt) switch supplying power to a line of 18 12 volt, 50 watt lamps. switch went out. is this caused by over-amperage draw?


Hi John, I'm an electrician and I think I can help you with this problem.

First and foremost, this switch's 2000VA / 1600W electrical rating is based on a incandescent load.

Let's do do the math on this one.. 18 x 50 = 900 watts. So, you're under the 1600 watt capacity, but I think this is a bit more involved than this.

I'd be willing to bet that you're not dimming a 12 volt circuit - but rather a 120 volt circuit that supplies one or more transformers that step the power down from 120 volts to the the 12 volt bulb voltage. A transformer is an inductive load. A transformer's inductive load is completely different than the incandescent load the dimmer is designed to control. The transformers are rated for 120 volts and will have issues including heat problems if provided less than the rated input voltage to provide a reduced output voltage you want so that you can dim these lights.

This switch will not work on the output of the transformer in this situation either because the significant amperage being switched here. Each of these lamps draws a bit over 4 amps as determined by ohm's law: 50W / 12V = 4.16A. The total load at 12 volts is (again, Ohm's law) 18 x 4.16A = 74.88A ! That means the wire would need to be a #4 or #2. This is about the size of the cable on your car's battery (only amperage determines conductor size - voltage determines insulation).

A dimmer on this circuit will not work unless the fixtures are changed so that no transformers are used to supply the lamps. This includes fluorescent lamps (compact or otherwise) unless the packaging specifically states that they can be used on a dimmer.

You may wish to contact Lutron Hotline at 800-523-9466 for additional help and suggestions. I hope this helps & good luck!

Mar 29, 2012 | Lutron Dimmers

1 Answer

Changing downlight globes


if its the gu10 bulbs that you twist round to release them well theres a small ****** that sticks on the bulb and removes it leaving the actual light fitting in the ceiling.

Sep 27, 2009 | Dimmers

2 Answers

When controlling a 300 watt cable lighting system


Sounds like a loose connection. If they all fo out, it's at the beginning of the circuit. Check all connections at the start of circuit.

Sep 01, 2009 | Lutron Electronic Low-Voltage...

1 Answer

Installing electronic transformer with 3 way touch dimmer switch


Consider using a MAELV-600 and a MA-R. The MAELV is rated for 600W Electronic Low-Voltage. The MAELV will require a neutral wire connection.

www.lutron.com/maestro

Aug 30, 2008 | Dimmers

1 Answer

What Kind of Dimmer?


If the low voltage lighting system uses an electronic transformer, then a dimmer designed for this type of transformer should be used. Likewise, if the low voltage lighting system uses a magnetic transformer, then a dimmer designed for this type of transformer should be used.

Aug 27, 2008 | Lutron TT-300NLH-BL Black Manual Lamp...

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