Question about Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Mig Welder problem

SIP 180 mig welder has suddenly stopped arcing and acts as if the earth is not attatched. Feed is running ok and all mechanical and cooling fan making the right noises.

Posted by on

  • nirvanalin Apr 19, 2009

    I used the mig the previous day with no problems. Turned it on the next day and every thing seemed ok ( wire feed and fans running ) but could not get an arc.

×

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Corporal:

    An expert that hasĀ over 10 points.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 6 Answers

Has the duty cycle been exceded? if so the control chip will shut it off.

Posted on Oct 25, 2008

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

No power to one outlet in bedroom.breakers are ok.


I would think that if the other outlets that are on the same circuit are still working, then I think I would try replacing the outlet in question.

Nov 15, 2014 | Leviton 15A Decora Electrical Outlet Light...

1 Answer

Thompson TG782T boost wireless transmission around home


The device does not have removable antennae so it isn't as easy as getting a more powerful antennae and connecting it. You would have to get something called a range extender or signal booster. These can act as an access point/repeater or just a repeater between access points.
I would suggest the kind that act as an access point/repeater and configuring them to connect to your wireless. They will provide coverage in the same manner as your router in that a certain distance from the access point will have optimal signal strength.

Jun 06, 2012 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Suddenly sounds out cooling fan noise, tick..tick..tick.. I have been running this switching hub for 2 years.


Get a can of Dust Off (Improperly known as 'canned air') and blow out all the vents and fan area.
This should rectify the problem.
If not, you may have to replace the fan.

Jun 21, 2011 | Nortel Networks Nortel Ethernet Routing...

1 Answer

How to play gta online


On this site http://www.gtasa.fr/download.php?act=category&id=34 you will find the software needed to run multiplayer. I advise you to look at the mods, maps, vehicles ..... to download.

Nov 13, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I need to delay data input through a RJ11 to serial input on start up of computer. Any Ideas? The data is a continious feed of weather data from my Peet Brothers weather station that goes to the internet....


If you have electronic knowledge you can construct a delay switch using a 555 timer IC to control a relay that connects the data line after a short time delay to the computer after the computer boots up.

Oct 17, 2009 | Adapters.com RJ11 / RJ12 (6 Conductor) -...

2 Answers

We are been told to use cat 6 on a project


Shielded cabling, of one type or another, has been the preferred cabling infrastructure in many global markets for many years. Cables described as foil screened unshielded twisted-pair (F/UTP) and fully shielded cables with an overall braid screen plus individual foil shielded twisted pairs (S/FTP) are now gaining popularity in markets where unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cabling has traditionally been the most common solution.
This rise in adoption is tied to the publication of the IEEE standard known as 802.3an 10GBASE-T and this emerging application's sensitivity to noise from adjacent cabling. This noise from adjacent cabling is known as alien crosstalk. Screened and fully shielded 10 Gb/s cabling systems, such as category 6A F/UTP and category 7 S/FTP, are all but immune to the alien crosstalk that presents problems for category 6A UTP cabling. These cabling systems can help reduce the size and cost of pathway spaces due to their smaller diameters.
Even as cabling installers and their clients increasingly enjoy these benefits, confusion surrounding the bonding and grounding of screened and shielded systems has caused some to avoid them. This concern is unfounded, as advances in screened and shielded cabling systems have simplified bonding and grounding methods tremendously. Today, the installation and bonding and grounding/earthing of F/UTP and S/FTP cabling systems requires little additional effort and expertise over UTP installations.

Jan 07, 2009 | Dynex 7' Cat 6 Network Cable - Gray

2 Answers

SIP 195 MIG welder doesnt work


sounds like your welder has over heated and the Thermostat has come on
wait for 10 minutes and then try again
If that does not work fit a new PCB
Gilmore

Jan 01, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

How to ground shielded network cable


There is no need for this shielding in most applications. There is always the consideration of ground loops that may be created, particularly, if large current RF energy is present. If you would care to read a discuss of the pertinent facts, see below.

"This message was received from Joe Gwinn of Raytheon regarding the shielding of Gigabit Ethernet links. These links run at data speeds of 1.25 x 10**9 (yes, 1.25 billion) bits per second, over two-pair, 150-ohm, balanced cabling. We use one pair for the transmit direction, and another pair for the receive direction. The 150-ohms balanced cabling has an overall shield, and here we are discussing whether to ground the shield at one end, the other, or both. Joe writes: On the matter of how to ground the shields (hardwire to ground, or through a capacitor), and ground currents melting shields, I would like to offer my experience with the care and feeding of ground loops in the shield protecting low- level signals: use a resistor, not a capacitor. Specifically, the voltage offset between chassis (green wire) grounds rarely exceeds ten volts. If one puts a hundred-ohm one-watt carbon resistor in series with the shield at either end, with the other end directly grounded to the chassis, the ground current will be limited to 0.1 amp, well within the abilities of the shield to carry. The twisted pair within the shield will still be protected from EMI etc, and a suitable differential receiver will have no difficulty handling the power frequency and harmonics 10-volt common-mode voltage. Actually, I have seen offsets of only a few volts in the laboratory, and have used ten-ohm one-watt carbon series resistors. I have seen several volts in large buildings, and in ships, so I would design for ten volts RMS. Which end should be hard grounded, and which should have the series resistor? I haven't tried this for communications signals, but my theory would be that the receiver end should be hard grounded, because it's the receiver that handles the lowest-level signal, and a zero-ohm ground is better than a 100-ohm ground. The effect may not be all that large, because shields handle high-impedance noise sources, and 100 ohms isn't much compared to those impedances, except perhaps at very high frequencies. The 100 ohm resistor could therefore be bypassed with a RF capacitor, which would be protected from ESD puncture by the 100-ohm resistor. By the way, the ground noise may be at triple the power frequency, if the user system has lots of capacitor-input 5- volt power supplies fed from the three legs of a three-phase prime power system. I have measured 2.4 volts RMS at 240 Hz in an Air Traffic Control automation system, until the green and white grounds were disentangled. The effective source impedance was about one ohm, if I recall. The waveform was pretty close to a sine wave. When it was able to drive a current through the VMEbus logic ground, the system promptly fell over. I knew I was in trouble when I saw a spark when I touched one ground to another. The tripling comes from the merger of the pulsating currents into the 5-volt power supplies in the common ground impedance. Joe Gwinn *-------------------(REPLY FROM DR. JOHNSON)--------------------* Thanks for your interest in High-Speed Digital Design. Joe, I am going to disagree with your suggestion that a shield with a resistor at one end acts as an effective EMI shield. In high-speed digital applications, it doesn't. In high-speed digital applications, a low impedance connection between the shield and the equipment chassis *at both ends* is required in order for the shield to do its job. The shield connection impedance must be low in the frequency range over which you propose for the shield to operate. The measure of shield connection efficacy for a high-speed connector is called the ground transfer impedance, or shield transfer impedance, of the connector, and it is a crucial parameter. In the example you cite, the ground transfer impedance at one end of the cable would be 100 ohms, rendering the shield useless. In low-speed applications involving high-impedance circuitry, where most of the near-field energy surrounding the conductors is in the electric field mode (as opposed to the magnetic field mode), shields need only be grounded at one end. In this case the shield acts as a Faraday cage surrounding the conductors, prevent the egress (or ingress) of electric fields. In high-speed applications involving low-impedance circuitry, most of the near-field energy surrounding the conductors is in the magnetic field mode, and for that problem, only a magnetic shield will work. That’s what the double-grounded shield provides. Grounding both ends of the shield permits high-frequency currents to circulate in the shield, which will counteract the currents flowing in the signal conductors. These counteracting currents create magnetic fields that cancel the magnetic fields emanating from the signal conductors, providing a magnetic shielding effect. For the magnetic shield to operate properly, we must provide means for current to enter (or exit) at both ends of the cable. As a result, a low-impedance connection to the chassis, operative over the frequency range of our digital signals, is required that *both* ends of our shielded cable. (See Henry Ott, “Noise Reduction Techniques in Electronic Systems”, 2nd ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1988.) There are shielding approaches that provide a low ground transfer impedance at high frequencies, while at the same time providing a much higher impedance at 60 Hz. These approaches involve the use of shields that are capacitively- coupled to the chassis. They are used where high-frequency shielding is needed, but where there is a desire to limit the circulation of 60-Hz currents. For a capacitively-coupled shield to work, the impedance of the capacitor, at the frequency of operation, must be very low. For example, if the signal wires couple to the shield through an impedance of 75 ohms (that’s another way of saying that the common-mode impedance of the cable is 75 ohms), and the shield is tied to ground through an impedance of 0.1 ohm, then we would expect to measure on the shield a voltage equal to (0.1/75) = 0.0013 times the common-mode signal voltage. The shield in this case would be giving us a 57dB shielding effectiveness. These are the specifications that our IEEE 802.3z 1000BASE-CX copper cabling groups feels are necessary to meet FCC/VDE regulations. For any shield to work in the Gigabit Ethernet application, we will therefore need a ground transfer impedance (that is the impedance between chassis and the shielded of the cable) less than about 0.1 ohms at 625 MHz. If you check the specifications for the BERG MetaGig shielded connector, it beats this specification. It provides a direct metallic connection between chassis and shield that goes all the way around the connector pins, completely enclosing the signal conductors. To achieve equivalent performance with a capacitively-coupled shield, the effective series inductance of the capacitor would have to be limited to less than about 16 PICO-henries. That small an inductance cannot be implemented in a leaded component, it would have to be a very low-inductance distributed capacitance, possibly implemented as a thin gasket distributed all the way around the connector shell, insulating the connector shell from the chassis. We have seen proposals for this type of connector, but have not seen one work in actual practice. I do not advocate the use of capacitively-coupled shields for our application because: (1) It would add complexity, (2) It hasn’t been demonstrated to work, and (3) It would not expand the range of our applications. Keep in mind that the short copper link we are discussing (P802.3z clause 39) is intended for use inside a wiring closet. It only goes 25 meters. It will be used between pieces of equipment intentionally tied to the same ground (we call out in the specification that this must be the case). Between such pieces of equipment there will be no large circulating ground currents. For longer connections, we provide other links types which do not require grounding at either end (multimode fiber, singlemode fiber, and category-5 unshielded twisted pairs). Direct grounding of the shield at both ends is the correct choice for our application. Best Regards,
Dr. Howard Johnson "

Oct 31, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Ethernet cord


Hi Dear Friend,
There can be number of reasons for this problem. To solve the problem, you can try these:

1. Check that RJ 45 connector, connected to switch/hub/pc is showing LED indication or not at the both the ends i.e pc end and at the switch/hub end.
2. Make sure switch and pc configuration should be correct and is not changed by mistake.
3. If LED indicators are not glowing any of the ends i.e PC or Switch end there might be a problem of ethernet cable, possible broken/cracked cable at some place or also possible that RJ 45 connector problem.
4. Also try the same cable to connect to different pc. Check, if it work then or not.

Hope this will solve the problem.
In case any other info is required pls. feel free to contact.

Thanks

Aug 02, 2008 | Kensington Portable Ethernet Cord (33052)

2 Answers

Software problem


Does this happen every time you download something from the internet?

Has the computer turned itself off while doing anything else?

How to Stop Laptop/Notebook Goes To Sleep or Hibernation when Closing Lid in Windows Vista
  1. Log on to your computer as an administrator. Click on Start, go to Control Panel -> System and Maintenance -> Power Options.
  2. Click on Change plan settings for the currently active plan.
  3. Click on Change advanced power settings link.
  4. In the “Power Options” dialog box’s “Advanced Settings” tab for the active power plan, expand Power buttons and lid.
  5. Expand Lid close action.
  6. Change the value to Do nothing for “Lid close action” by selecting a new option from drop down menu for both On battery and Plugged in.

740549c.jpgBased on own preference, it’s possible to set other action from the menu too. Available for selection is Do nothing, Sleep, Hibernate and Shutdown.
  1. Click OK button.
How to Disable Notebook Computer to Stand By or Hibernate on Closing Lid in Windows XP
  1. Log on to your computer as an administrator. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
  2. Click Performance and Maintenance.
  3. Click Power Options.
  4. Click Advanced tab.
  5. Under “Power buttons” section, select Do nothing from drop down menu for When I close the lid on my portable computer option.

e461aeb.gifAgain, any other settings such as Stand by and Hibernate can be set based on own preference.
  1. Click OK button.
Let me know if this helps - if not - PLEASE, further clairify so we can continue to find a fix for your problem....

Jul 22, 2008 | Computers & Internet

Not finding what you are looking for?
Computers & Internet Logo

Related Topics:

129 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Computers & Internet Experts

Brian Sullivan
Brian Sullivan

Level 3 Expert

27725 Answers

kakima

Level 3 Expert

98829 Answers

David Payne
David Payne

Level 3 Expert

14071 Answers

Are you a Computer and Internet Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...