Question about Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm Lens

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D80 flash doesn't close

I purchased this camera used. i believe a screw used to sit next to the hole where the flash hook (on the bottom) fits into the top (flash piece). i'd like to see a picture of a working d80 and find out how/where i can buy a replacement part, if my assessment is correct.

in other words: what does a function d80 flash piece look like from the front, and where can i buy replacement parts?

hope this makes sense,
erik

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Erik, It's a little plastic arm with a tiny hook that moves to allow the flash to pop up when you press the flash button on the front of the camera or select the built-in flash option.  You may be able to get parts direct from Nikon or if you have a good local repair shop they may have a parts D80 to cannibalize for you if you have the skill to put it together.  If you got the camera at a good price and don't really rely on the built-in flash, (one on the hot shoe is always better) then tape that puppy down with some electrical tape until the repair is done and shoot all you want, peel it back for the pop up when you need a fill in flash or you don't have the flash with you.
randy320sgi 

Posted on Jan 02, 2009

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I have a Nikon DC 60, the flash "pops" up but does


Hi,

We have a solution for this on Fixya. Check the details below and it should fix the issue.

My D60 flash problem was that the flash would pop up, but would not flash. The release lever would keep "clicking"...it did no know that the flash was up. Since I was told that the min cost of sending it to Nikon for repair was $250, I downloaded a repair/service manual for the D60 from http://www.tradebit.com/filedetail.php/9029672-nikon-d60-service-repair-manual ($8.99)
This manual gives a step by step assembly and disassembly of the camera.

I actually lucked up and fixed my problem...

Problem Descripton/Solution (short version):
There was a tiny plastic collar at the flash hinge that got pushed back into the camera. This collar served to close a couple of contacts. I stuck a home made wire/double hook tool into the hinge clearance hole and pulled the collar out and snapped it back into place.

Problem Description/Solution (LONG version)

WARNINGS (based on experience)
1. Yes, the flash will still shock the **** out of you..even with the battery out. You will smell burnt hair/flesh.
2. Be careful of the tiny contact leaf springs. They are hard to bend back into the correct position.
3. The #00 screws are easy to strip out. Apply firm pressure, turn slowly, and make sure screw driver is aligned properly.
4. Proceed at own risk (to camera). Make sure your warranty really has run out. There are many ways to make things worse. You can back out now and buy an external flash.

All I had to take apart however was the top cover of the flash (two tiny screws on underside of the flash #00 philips head). I found that there are two tiny copper or gold "leaf spring" contacts that have to close to send a signal that the flash is up. These are located at the hinge where the flash wiring runs into a clearance hole into the camera (hole is a center of rotation of the flash). There is a small plasitc collar that fits into this clearance hole from inside the flash/camera base and through the flash housing at the pivot point and snaps into place via 2 plastic hooks or tabs (download/see repair manual). This collar serves to secure the flash housing to the base but also has a tiny pin sticking out that catches one of the contact leaf springs and closes the circuit. The problem is that this collar got knocked out of place and pushed back into the camera. I made a home made wire/double hook tool out of 22 gauge wire (see attached picture) and worked it into the clearance hole by pinching the hooks together and working it in. Go in above the flash wires (top of hole) since the wire path goes downward into the camera. With some work and luck I was able to hook the edge of the collar and pull it back out and snap it back in place.

I then put the flash cover back on and everything still seems to work.

My Hook Tool....
.ee5038d.jpg

Let us know if this resolved your problem.

* Please rate this solution with Thumbs up and comment to help us improve providing support

Nov 13, 2010 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

The flash is spring loaded and does not fully open when the release button is pushed. Must be manually held in upper position in order for the flash to work. Help me fix it


The Spring mount breaks in the flash and loses tension.

Anyway if you are brave and handy you CAN fix this.

First remove the back of the camera - 3 screws in battery bay, 1 in the side above the memory card door, The two rear most on the bottom, two in the USB/video door, and the rear most on the left hand carry strap bracket.
Carefully prise the back rearward about 5 to 8 mm.

Now take a look at the two screw holes under the flash (when popped - or flopped out now that is broken) now go and bend a screwdriver of the type you used for the previous screws - you will need a 90 degree bend very close to the tip to fit in this gap and be able to turn the screws a few degrees at at time.
A little at a time lock the screwdriver into the screws and undo until the flash cover comes off.

You can then slide the shaft out of the flash to release the spring which will have the end that should fit into the broken bracket now sitting proud..

Make a suitable U shaped bracket that will slide over the broken plastic bracket and drill a tiny hole in the side where the spring will clip in.

.
make sure it fits really well and then epoxy into position.

Getting the spring back in is a fiddly job - I found the best way was to fit the end of the spring into the new bracket, slide the shaft just into the spring - the lever the other end of the spring down into the back of the flash body and then slide the shaft all the way into place.

I did have to file down the little plastic "blade" inside the lid which presumably is designed to assist the the (now broken) bracket from breaking....
reverse the dis-assembly and now you should have a working flash

Oct 25, 2010 | Fuji FinePix S700 Digital Camera

1 Answer

My Nikon D60 flash has stopped working despite being in flash mode. Any ideas?


My D60 flash problem was that the flash would pop up, but would not flash. The release lever would keep "clicking"...it did no know that the flash was up. Since I was told that the min cost of sending it to Nikon for repair was $250, I downloaded a repair/service manual for the D60 from http://www.tradebit.com/filedetail.php/9029672-nikon-d60-service-repair-manual ($8.99)
This manual gives a step by step assembly and disassembly of the camera.

I actually lucked up and fixed my problem...

Problem Descripton/Solution (short version):
There was a tiny plastic collar at the flash hinge that got pushed back into the camera. This collar served to close a couple of contacts. I stuck a home made wire/double hook tool into the hinge clearance hole and pulled the collar out and snapped it back into place.

Problem Description/Solution (LONG version)

WARNINGS (based on experience)
1. Yes, the flash will still shock the **** out of you..even with the battery out. You will smell burnt hair/flesh.
2. Be careful of the tiny contact leaf springs. They are hard to bend back into the correct position.
3. The #00 screws are easy to strip out. Apply firm pressure, turn slowly, and make sure screw driver is aligned properly.
4. Proceed at own risk (to camera). Make sure your warranty really has run out. There are many ways to make things worse. You can back out now and buy an external flash.

All I had to take apart however was the top cover of the flash (two tiny screws on underside of the flash #00 philips head). I found that there are two tiny copper or gold "leaf spring" contacts that have to close to send a signal that the flash is up. These are located at the hinge where the flash wiring runs into a clearance hole into the camera (hole is a center of rotation of the flash). There is a small plasitc collar that fits into this clearance hole from inside the flash/camera base and through the flash housing at the pivot point and snaps into place via 2 plastic hooks or tabs (download/see repair manual). This collar serves to secure the flash housing to the base but also has a tiny pin sticking out that catches one of the contact leaf springs and closes the circuit. The problem is that this collar got knocked out of place and pushed back into the camera. I made a home made wire/double hook tool out of 22 gauge wire (see attached picture) and worked it into the clearance hole by pinching the hooks together and working it in. Go in above the flash wires (top of hole) since the wire path goes downward into the camera. With some work and luck I was able to hook the edge of the collar and pull it back out and snap it back in place.

I then put the flash cover back on and everything still seems to work.

My Hook Tool....
.ee5038d.jpg

Sep 12, 2010 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

5 Answers

Flash repair


My Olympus SP-570uz also has a broken flash spring. I found that small a coil spring approximately 3/16" max diameter and approximately 7/8" to 1" long can be inserted in the flash cavity when it is open - place on the right side (looking at the front of the camera) in the area that does not interfere with the small latch that locks the flash in the down position. The coil spring will need to compress enough to allow the flash to close completely.

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1 Answer

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Jun 25, 2009 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

1 Answer

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2 Answers

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Anyway if you are brave and handy you CAN fix this.

First remove the back of the camera - 3 screws in battery bay, 1 in the side above the memory card door, The two rear most on the bottom, two in the USB/video door, and the rear most on the left hand carry strap bracket.
Carefully prise the back rearward about 5 to 8 mm.

Now take a look at the two screw holes under the flash (when popped - or flopped out now that is broken) now go and bend a screwdriver of the type you used for the previous screws - you will need a 90 degree bend very close to the tip to fit in this gap and be able to turn the screws a few degrees at at time.
A little at a time lock the screwdriver into the screws and undo until the flash cover comes off.

You can then slide the shaft out of the flash to release the spring which will have the end that should fit into the broken bracket now sitting proud..

Make a suitable U shaped bracket that will slide over the broken plastic bracket and drill a tiny hole in the side where the spring will clip in.

.
make sure it fits really well and then epoxy into position.

Getting the spring back in is a fiddly job - I found the best way was to fit the end of the spring into the new bracket, slide the shaft just into the spring - the lever the other end of the spring down into the back of the flash body and then slide the shaft all the way into place.

I did have to file down the little plastic "blade" inside the lid which presumably is designed to assist the the (now broken) bracket from breaking....
reverse the dis-assembly and now you should have a working flash

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