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Safely disposing of used chemistry set

Can you tell me the safest way to dispose of this partially-used chemistry set? The set is several years old, but there are still chemicals in many of the vials. Thank you.
Karen Seidman

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Contact your local waste plant. The place where you would drop off old unusable items like old mattresses, etc.aka The Dump. They have an area for hazardous waste like old paints, etc. This would be the place to drop it off. I know in our area, they do not charge to drop off old oil, paints, etc. as you are doing the right thing for the environment by not sticking it in the trash.

Good Luck! from Moms Just Know

Posted on Oct 24, 2008

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What experiments can I do with deluxe scientist kit?


It used to be you could do all sorts of stuff, like make stinky smells and make loud pops and bangs. These days everyone is so careful that there isn't much you can do. In any case, I use Google to find more details about the particular set you are thinking of.
Top Chemistry Sets or
Science Project Kits Buy Online at Fat Brain Toys

Jul 06, 2014 | Edu-Science Dolls, Playsets & Toy Figures

1 Answer

Chemical kinetics given msc pre.notes and thermodynamic classical thermo statistical thermo given notes me goolgle search all topics but i am not understand plz help me renu prajapati msc previous...


Hi, Itsrenu_prai,

I'd like to help you, but I do not understand what you are asking. It seems you are saying that you googled about chemical kinetics, and classical and statistical thermodynamics with the help of your notes in the kit but you are lost and don't understand any of it. It would be more productive, I think, if you would back up and take it one step at a time, and ask one question, so we would have some particualar place to start.

Good luck. I will be waiting for your specific questions.

Dec 28, 2010 | Scientific Explorer My First Chemistry Kit

1 Answer

We bought an grow colossal chrystals kit but no instruction manual included


Hi, cats92357,

Please allow me to give you some general instructions that might serve you well despite not having your instruction manual. I have had a lot of experience growing crystals, starting way back when I was a high school sophomore, and later after my college days when I was a chemical researcher often needing to purify chemical compounds. There were many different methods I used, but crystallization has always been one of my favorite ways, especially when my lab was in my childhood home's kitchen. Back then I followed detailed recipes (like you are probably expecting) from library books, but I always found them so tedious because of their many steps.

I think you might appreciate a simpler set of instructions that'll give you the general ideas behind successful crytal growing that you could apply to almost any inorganic chemicals ("salts") you have available in your chemistry kit or in your home.

The General Method (no details at first to give you just the overview - for details see the very bottom of this posted message.)
  1. Prepare a saturated solution of the chemical compound (the "solute") in water (the "solvent") at room temperature.
  2. Decant off most of the clear solution into another container, a process that allows you to separate the liquid from the excess solid on the bottom, so the liquid is particle-free.
  3. Add slightly more of the solid chemical to the saturated solution, keeping a record of how much you added.
  4. Heat the heterogeneous mixture (liquid + undissolved solid) to dissolve all of the solid.
  5. Filter out any undissolved solids particles to produce a perfectly clear solution still at the elevated temperature.
  6. Cover the top of the clear hot solution (loosely wrapped aluminum foil or paper towel) and let it cool slowly back down to room temperature. At this point you will have made what is called a supersaturated solution. That is what you need for successful crystal growing.
OK, now while the solution is cooling down, you can get different and interesting results depending on what you do next.

You could do one or more of the following steps:
  • Let the solution continue to cool down slowly undisturbed and let crystals begin to form spontaneously. This could take minutes, hours, or days, depending on a) the solute, b) the amount of chemical you added in step 2, and/or c) on how fast the solution cools. YOUR CRYSTALS WILL BE LARGER IF THEY FORM SLOWLY. THE FASTER THEY FORM, THE SMALLER THEY WILL BE. There's a lot of experimentation you could do to obtain optimum results! Just keep a record of how much chemical used, and every step of your procedure, so you can reproduce what you did, and so you can have a reference upon which to make small measurable changes in your scientific investigations.
  • Gently scratch the inside of the container (preferably made of glass) just below the surface of the room-temperature liquid with a glass stirring rod. Do this if you get impatient, since this technique often speeds up the crystallization process. The scratched surface, if you could see it under a high-powered microscope, would reveal broken silicon oxide bonds (from the molecular structure of glass) that would attract ions from your solute and initiate the crystallization process. You would see tiny crystals forming at the freshly scratced surface. They would become the nucleus or center for crystal growth. If you are using an glass container that has had a lot of use, there will already be enough scratched surfaces to do the job without your using a stirring rod. If you want more control on the rate of crystallization, I recommend that you use a brand new unused glass container.
  • Suspend your best tiny seed crystal (of the same substance) inside the cooling solution. This will cause most of the solute to grow only on your seed crystal and not so much on the glass surfaces. You can get really big crystals this way! The seed crytal would have to be large enough to allow tying with sewing thread. The seed crystal can be made by pouring a small volume of the still hot solution into a petri dish or some other small container like a saucer or dessert bowl or cup, etc, to have a shallow liquid level. Cover very loosely with paper towel and let the water evaporate. You want it to evaporate faster than your main solution above, but slow enough to allow crystals large enough to tie with thread. BE CAREFUL NOT TO SUSPEND THE SEED CRYSTAL IN THE SOLUTION WHILE IT IS STILL HOT ENOUGH TO DISSOLVE IT. Let the solution cool some first. Keep trying until your seed crystal does not dissolve; it's no big deal if it does, just tie another one and try again until you succeed. It will take some practice.
Salts that are often used for successful crystallization experiments are:
  • copper sulfate pentahydrate, CuSO4*5H2O. I'm using the asterisk to indicate that the water molecules are bonded to the metal. You can probably buy this salt at gardening shops, because it is used as a fungicide and also as a root killer to control tree root growth. It also is sometimes called "blue vitriol" or "bluestone." You probably guessed it, this hydrate is a beautiful blue crystalline solid.
  • aluminum potassium sulfate, KAl(SO4)2*12H2O, also known as potash alum (icolorless), and can be bought in a grocery store, because it is used in pickling.
  • chromium potassium sulfate, KCr(SO4)2*12H2O, also known as chrom alum (dark violet), and is used in tanning leather.
More details regarding the "General Method" described at the top:
  • Step 1 - Add enough chemical until the solid no longer dissolves but instead just falls to the bottom of the container. Add, stir, add, stir, etc, until you get a small layer of solid on the bottom of the container. This process allows you to form the needed saturated solution. It can hold only a certain amount of the chemical at a given temperature.
  • Step 2 - You could omit this decantation step if you were satisfied with the amount of solid on the bottom of the container.
  • Step 3 - You could also omit this step if you decided to use the solid already placed on the bottom of the container during step 1. However, using steps 2 and 3 as originally listed at the top might be better if you would like to be able to measure the amount of extra solid used.
  • Step 4 - This heating step necessary to convert the saturated solution into an unsaturated solution, that is a solution that has not reached its maximum level of dissolved solute. For most solutes, their ability to dissolve in water increases with temperature. The higher the temperature, the more salt can dissolve in a given volume of solvent.
  • Step 5 - This filtering step is needed to remove impurities, including dust, which could interfere with the crystallization process. You could use an oven mit to hold the container while you tilt it and pour the liquid into another (clean) container. Or, fold some paper towels together to use as an insulating strap to wrap around the neck of the container with both hands as you pour. DO THIS QUICKLY TO AVOID RAPID AND UNCONTROLLED COOLING. Too fast cooling will almost always result in the formation of small crystals.
  • Step 6 - Place the still hot container of clear solution on top of a dry insulated surface to avoid a rapid transfer of heat and uncontrolled cooling.
Good luck!

###

Dec 26, 2010 | Scientific Explorer My First Chemistry Kit

1 Answer

Clculate the amount of oxygen for the combusion of carbon 188gms calculate the mass of carbondioxied form?


This problem is the type often encountered in a first semester chemistry course, whether in high school or college.

It is very easy to solve if you already understand the following concepts, and if you also have had lots of practice applying them!
  • PROPORTIONS
  • THE MOLE
  • The LAW OF CONSERVATION
  • CHEMICAL EQUATIONS
  • BALANCED CHEMICAL EQUATIONS
  • STOICHIOMETRIC CALCULATIONS
  • SIGNIFICANT FIGURES, PRECISION, & ROUNDING OFF CALCULATED QUANTITIES
Initially, I will assume you already understand the above concepts, except for "stoichiometric calculations." I'd be happy to focus more on the other topics at another time, depending on interest, as indicated by posted questions.

To solve this problem you must be aware of the balanced chemical equation, as follows:
dubblea.jpg Notice that there is one C, one O2, and one CO2.
(For convenience in my post, I am writing the subscripts on the same line,)

"One what?" You might ask. It can be one "molecule" for each the O2 and CO2; and one "atom" of C. For the method of stoichiometry in this problem, we should use one "mole." So, there is one mole of C, one mole of O2, and one mole of CO2. In other words, the PROPORTION of these reactants (C and O2) and product (CO2), is one to one to one, also written one:one:one (or 1:1:1).

As I am assuming you know, these numbers are called the "coefficients" of the balanced chemical equation.

To calculate the mass in grams of O2 (the unknown quantity), we will need only the moles of O2 and the moles of one other substance from the balanced chemical equation. Since we are given the mass of C, we can use the moles of C.

TO WORK A STOICHIOMETRIC problem using a balanced chemical equation, YOU MUST INCLUDE THE MOLES OF TWO SUBSTANCES from the chemical equation in your calcuation, in this case, moles of C and moles of O2. As you know, you can calculate moles of C from the mass (in grams) of C that was given in this problem. You must calculate the moles of O2 by use of the following math expression:

mol O2 = (MOLE RATIO of O2 to C) x mol C.

(Notice that I have used the official abbreviation of moles, which is "mol".)

I will show you how to calculate the MOLE RATIO a moment.

Once you have caculated the moles of O2, you will have only one more calculation to do to calculate the number of grams of O2. Since I am assuming you already know how to calculate grams from moles, I will skip this step until my closing summary.

The MOLE RATIO can be calculated as follows:dubblea_2.jpg The calculated mole ratio will always equal the ratio of corresponding coefficients.

Notice that the mole ratio actually represents the ratio of the coefficients that are in the balanced chemical equation, and is written in the same order as are the calculated (calc'd) moles.

Therefore,
dubblea_4.jpg
So, you can see that the number of moles of O2 = calculated moles of C.

The moles of C were calculated as follows:

The calculated moles of C = [grams C] / [MW of C] = [188 g C / 12.0 g] = 15.7 mol C


Therefore, there are 15.7 moles of O2, as calculated from use of the math expression (with boxes) shown above.


The wanted GRAMS of O2 are calculated from MW of O2 times its number of moles, as follows:


Grams of O2 = 32.0 g O2 x 15.7 mol O2 = 502 grams O2.



For your convenience as you make conversions among grams and moles, you may use the following memory aid: dubblea_5.jpg

To go from moles to grams, just notice that moles are beside MW, so multiplying them will give grams (moles x MW = grams). If you want to go from grams to moles, notice that grams are over MW, so (grams/MW) = moles. If you should want to calculate MW, you would divide grams by moles, (grams/moles) = MW.


One more tip: When doing calculations, use at least the same number of significant figures (sig figs) in the molecular weights (and atomic weights) as is in the given numerical data. That is, since there are three sig figs in 188 grams of C, use 12.0 as the atomic weight of C, and 44.0 as the MW of CO2. You would obtain the same answer using 12 and 44, but as you may know, following this rule would be more important in other problems in which the digit past the decimal is not zero. This allows proper rounding off of the final calculated quantity.


In Summary

  • Write the chemical equation, and balance it.
  • Use MOLES to do the necessary stoichiometric calculations. Convert grams to moles to make this possible.
  • Multiply the calculated moles of the given amount of chemical compound (or element) by the COEFFICIENT RATIO of the two compounds involved in the problem.
  • Convert moles to grams if grams are asked for by the problem.
  • Round off correctly.
  • Show the answer quantity, which should always show both numerical value AND unit.

Suggestion: Try out this method to other problems involving a chemical reaction. Good luck!


***



Dec 12, 2010 | Scientific Explorer My First Chemistry Kit

1 Answer

What are the insructoins of grow colossal crystals kit


Hi, Plantmasterz,

Here's something I hope you will find useful until you can find your chemistry kit's instructions manual.

Please allow me to give you some general instructions that might serve you well despite not having your instruction manual. I have had a lot of experience growing crystals, starting way back when I was a high school sophomore, and later after my college days when I was a chemical researcher often needing to purify chemical compounds. There were many different methods I used, but crystallization has always been one of my favorite ways, especially when my lab was in my childhood home's kitchen. Back then I followed detailed recipes (like you are probably expecting) from library books, but I always found them so tedious because of their many steps.

I think you might appreciate a simpler set of instructions that'll give you the general ideas behind successful crytal growing that you could apply to almost any inorganic chemicals ("salts") you have available in your chemistry kit or in your home.

The General Method (no details at first to give you just the overview - for details see the very bottom of this posted message.)

  1. Prepare a saturated solution of the chemical compound (the "solute") in water (the "solvent") at room temperature.
  2. Decant (pour off) most of the clear solution into another container, a process that allows you to separate the liquid from the excess solid on the bottom, so the liquid is particle-free.
  3. Add slightly more of the solid chemical to the saturated solution, keeping a record of how much you added.
  4. Heat the heterogeneous mixture (liquid + undissolved solid) to dissolve all of the solid.
  5. Filter out any undissolved solids particles to produce a perfectly clear (no noticeable particles) solution, still at the elevated temperature. If the chemical compound is colored, the solution should be that color, but clear.
  6. Cover the top of the clear hot solution (loosely wrapped aluminum foil or paper towel) and let it cool slowly back down to room temperature. At this point you will have made what is called a supersaturated solution. That is what you need for successful crystal growing.
OK, now while the solution is cooling down, you can get different and interesting results depending on what you do next.

You could do one or more of the following steps:

  • Let the solution continue to cool down slowly undisturbed and let crystals begin to form spontaneously. This could take minutes, hours, or days, depending on a) the solute, b) the amount of chemical you added in step 2, and/or c) on how fast the solution cools. YOUR CRYSTALS WILL BE LARGER IF THEY FORM SLOWLY. THE FASTER THEY FORM, THE SMALLER THEY WILL BE. There's a lot of experimentation you could do to obtain optimum results! Just keep a record of how much chemical used, and every step of your procedure, so you can reproduce what you did, and so you can have a reference upon which to make small measurable changes in your scientific investigations.
  • Gently scratch the inside of the container (preferably made of glass) just below the surface of the room-temperature liquid with a glass stirring rod. Do this if you get impatient, since this technique often speeds up the crystallization process. The scratched surface, if you could see it under a high-powered microscope, would reveal broken silicon oxide bonds (from the molecular structure of glass) that would attract ions from your solute and initiate the crystallization process. You would see tiny crystals forming at the freshly scratced surface. They would become the nucleus or center for crystal growth. If you are using an glass container that has had a lot of use, there will already be enough scratched surfaces to do the job without your using a stirring rod. If you want more control on the rate of crystallization, I recommend that you use a brand new unused glass container.
  • Suspend your best tiny seed crystal (of the same substance) inside the cooling solution. Tie it with a length of sewing thread tied to the end of a pencil or other rod-shaped support. Hang the seed crystal away from the sides and bottom of the container. This will cause most of the solute to grow only on your seed crystal and not so much on the glass surfaces. You can get really big crystals this way! The seed crytal would have to be large enough to allow tying with sewing thread.
  • How to grow a seed crystal and successfully position it: The seed crystal can be made by pouring a small volume of the still hot solution into a petri dish or some other small container like a saucer or dessert bowl or cup, etc, to have a shallow liquid level. Cover very loosely with paper towel and let the water evaporate. You want it to evaporate faster than your main solution above, but slow enough to allow crystals large enough to tie with thread. BE CAREFUL NOT TO SUSPEND THE SEED CRYSTAL IN THE SOLUTION WHILE IT IS STILL HOT ENOUGH TO DISSOLVE IT. Let the solution cool just a little. Keep trying until your seed crystal does not dissolve; it's no big thing if it does, just tie another one and try again until you succeed. It will take some practice.
Salts that are often used for successful crystallization experiments are:

  • copper sulfate pentahydrate, CuSO4*5H2O. I'm using the asterisk to indicate that the water molecules are bonded to the metal. You can probably buy this salt at gardening shops, because it is used as a fungicide and also as a root killer to control tree root growth. It also is sometimes called "blue vitriol" or "bluestone." You probably guessed it, this hydrate is a beautiful blue crystalline solid.
  • aluminum potassium sulfate, KAl(SO4)2*12H2O, also known as potash alum (icolorless), and can be bought in a grocery store, because it is used in pickling.
  • chromium potassium sulfate, KCr(SO4)2*12H2O, also known as chrom alum (dark violet), and is used in tanning leather.
More details regarding the "General Method" described at the top: (the step numbers refer to the same steps listed above.)

  • Step 1 - Add enough chemical until the solid no longer dissolves but instead just falls to the bottom of the container. Add, stir, add, stir, etc, until you get a small layer of solid on the bottom of the container. This process allows you to form the needed saturated solution. It can hold only a certain amount of the chemical at a given temperature.
  • Step 2 - You could omit this decantation step if you were satisfied with the amount of solid on the bottom of the container.
  • Step 3 - You could also omit this step if you decided to use the solid already placed on the bottom of the container during step 1. However, using steps 2 and 3 as originally listed at the top might be better if you would like to be able to measure the amount of extra solid used.
  • Step 4 - This heating step necessary to convert the saturated solution into an unsaturated solution, that is a solution that has not reached its maximum level of dissolved solute. For most solutes, their ability to dissolve in water increases with temperature. The higher the temperature, the more salt can dissolve in a given volume of solvent.
  • Step 5 - This filtering step is needed to remove impurities, including dust, which could interfere with the crystallization process. You could use an oven mit to hold the container while you tilt it and pour the liquid into another (clean) container. Or, fold some paper towels together to use as an insulating strap to wrap around the neck of the container with both hands as you pour. DO THIS QUICKLY TO AVOID RAPID AND UNCONTROLLED COOLING. Too fast cooling will almost always result in the formation of small crystals.
  • Step 6 - Place the still hot container of clear solution on top of a dry insulated surface to avoid a rapid transfer of heat and uncontrolled cooling.
Good luck!

###

Dec 11, 2010 | Scientific Explorer My First Chemistry Kit

2 Answers

What is the electron dot diagram for nitrogen


The electron-dot structure (also known as the "Lewis dot structure") for N is shown below:dubblea_6.jpg The red dots represent electrons that comprise the atom's 5 valence electrons. Recall that the valence (outermost) electrons are those that are involved in chemical reactions of bonding. The rule you should apply to drawing this electron dot structure is to first draw (or imagine) a rectangle around the atom's symbol, letting the rectangle represent the atom's core electrons (not shown), those within the atom's inner (s) shell. Then place one electron on each side. That leaves the remaining electron to be placed on one of the already occupied sides to give the electron pair.

It doesn't matter what side you place this 5th electron, because the final result is the pattern shown above, 3 single dots and one pair of dots, which neatly reveals the bonding power* of N (3) - and the existence of the one electron pair, which predicts special types of reactivity you will probably appreciate in more advanced topics of this element's behavior.

*The single electrons are more reactive than the electron pair, and will readily form bonds with other atoms, such as H. This allows you to predict that N and H atoms will combine to form NH3.

How do you know there are 5 valence electrons? For the answer, refer to the following partial image of the Periodic Table of the Elements I drew using Word and SnagIT software:
dubblea.gif
Notice the number-letter labels above each column ("group") of elements, for example "5A." The letter A indicates the groups of "representative" elements, the most common elements studied in general chemistry courses. The numbers before the "A" represents the number of valence electrons surrounding each element's atoms. For example, hydrogen has one valence electron, nitrogen has 5 valence electrons, and oxygen has 6 valence electrons.

Using the rules described above for drawing electron-dot structures, how many single dots and double dots should be drawn around H? Around O? Can you predict the bonding power of each of these atoms? What molecular compounds do you predict would be formed from the reaction of H and H? What molecular compound do you predict would form between combining H atoms and O?

Hints:
Reactions tend to occur that cause the single electrons (dots) to pair up. This occurs because paired electrons are much more stable than single electrons. A strong driving force for a reaction is the going from a less stable state to a more stable state. Hydrogen atoms from H2 molecules (diatomic molecules). H and O atoms combine to form dihydrogen oxide, also known as water!

Summary:
  • A very simple set of rules allows you to predict the electron dot structures of the representative elements.
  • The electron dot structures are very useful, because they can allow you to predict the bonding power of each representative element.
  • They are also useful in guiding your prediction of the compositions of molecules that can form during reactions between their atoms (that is, how many of each element in the molecule).
  • In more advanced topics you will also be able to use electron-dot structures to predict the shapes (or geometry) of molecules, including bond angles!
  • So, learning the skill of drawing electron-dot structures is very important to mastering chemistry!

###

Nov 04, 2010 | Scientific Explorer My First Chemistry Kit

1 Answer

My sister gave my daughter her daughter's Butterscotch horse. When we started to put new batteries in, the old batteries were still in and battery acid leaked all in the battery pack. Is there a way to...


It all depends on the severity of the corrosion, but I have started with denatured alcohol and an acid brush. Do this over a plastic disposable cup. Let this dry and then try baking soda and water solution and see if it will cut the corrosion. I have Contact cleaner that I use then, if you have some where you can get that done. I use De-ox-it and again with a clean acid brush work it in.

Aug 10, 2010 | Hasbro Furreal Friends Butterscotch Pony

1 Answer

Examples of investigatory projects


Hi, Arniejane,

You have asked a very good question!. I hope you are still interested in an answer to it, even though a new school year has begun and is running since you first asked it.

I will be brief, since I am not sure you are still interested, because you have probably moved on to another grade. I will give my best advice in a few words for now, saving more details unitl you post an update to your original question.

To start a good quality chemistry investigation, you should avoid selecting a cookie-cutter topic that thousands of other students have already done. Instead, begin your own investigation (research) project simply by asking a question about something in the world around you that you are REALLY interested in learning more about that no one else already has complete answers to.

Ask as many questions like that that you can think of, and select the one that you think you could solve through experiments in the time allowed. That won't be difficult, because almost everything you ask will most likely have a chemical connection, since chemistry is often described as the central science.

Chemistry can be found everywhere, in your home, school, your front or back yard, in you, in your food, your medicines, your clothing, in toys, in machines, in paper, in inks, in paints, in dyes, in soil, in your environment (air, weather, climate, pollution, topsoil contaminants, drinking water, etc), in materials (automobile tires, fuel, clothing, bandaides, etc), in cosmetics, vitamins ... the list goes on and on! From among these and others that you can think of, you can probably list at least one or more questions that could be developed into a really high quality "investigatory project."

It would be important to select a question that requires measurement of some sort. Measurement allows one to collect data, which are the bases of most good investigations. You want to be able to find a data-based solution to your question. Without data, the project you do would not be "scientific."

Give more consideration to questions that require materials already available a) in your chemistry kit, b) in your school lab, or c) in your local community. Also consider seeking advice and materials from the colleges in your metropolitan area. Many professors would be delighted to help you by answering your questions about technical difficulties that might occur as you work on your investigation - just be mindful that you should acknowledge their help in your investigation's final report.

If you post an update to your question, please include more details on your interests that could the sparks for good ideas for specific projects. I'd be glad to help you with the chemical connections, sometimes they are subtle and not immediately recognizable.

Good luck!

###

Jun 29, 2010 | Scientific Explorer My First Chemistry Kit

1 Answer

Carb set up for old Webra 61


Let me see if I have got this right, you will charge me a few dollars to tell me the answer to the problem, but if I have worked it out for myself then you want me to tell you how I did it for free?

Dah - Like if I'm smart enough to work it out then I sure am smart enough not to tell you for free!

To answer your question, yes, I have solved it, and if you send me $20 then I'll tell you how I did it.

Thanks for wasting my time anyway, Very Best Regards from England!

Nov 22, 2009 | Webra 61 Rc Helicopter Engine With Dynamix...

1 Answer

How to know if chemicals in a kids chemistry set are still good.


The answer is on the link you provided (super safe chenistry set). The chemicals in these sets are very weak and cover things which I learnt in primary school. The kids MUST be supervised though as chemicals can at least damage furniture and carpets if abused. The chemicals should not have deteriorated as anything that would would have a date on it.

Jul 07, 2009 | Natural Science Industries Natural Science...

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