Question about Pentax SF1n 35mm SLR Camera

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Exposure/ISO compensation Hi. 1. I shot 5 films with one battery. No problem. I just wanted to know how much longer will it take. 2. Haven't used exposure compensation and ISO changing mark. Want to know what will be the effects if I use these features and how this will help to my photos. thank you.

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Re: exposure/ISO compensation


usually around 15 to 20 rolls of 36 exposure film. the iso compensation will either lighten or darken your prints. a good feature if you don't want to change depth of field. ( f-stop )

Posted on Dec 13, 2008

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Hi, I have a minolta maxxum xtsi and don't know how to set the aperture/f-stop while shooting in full manual. there is an ISO setting option but that is for the speed of the film righ? or are ISA and...

ISO and aperture are most definitely not the same thing. ISO is the speed of the film. Aperture is the size of the opening in the lens, the larger the opening the more light comes through.

To change the aperture in Manual mode, hold down the exposure compensation button near the lens mount and turn the control dial on the front of the camera.

Jan 10, 2011 | Minolta Maxxum XTsi 35mm SLR Camera

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I have trouble taking indoor (low light) photos. pictures come out blury and the camera does not snap the picture properly i have a nikon 35 mm n6006 camera

Hi Rebecca--
The hardest thing about low light photography is balancing your available shutter speed to the amount of action you're trying to capture.
Here are a few things to try:
1) Try using a tripod. Steadying your camera during long exposures will greatly improve your image clarity.
2) Buy a faster film. You may need to increase your film's ISO setting. Try 400 to start, then go up from there. Remember, faster film always produces grainy images, and it usually costs a little more to process. If you're stuck with 100 ISO, you can always "push process" the film, where a given ISO is let to sit in its developer longer than usual--This will cost you more too!
3) Invest in a good flash system. Nikon has tons of hotshoe flash systems that rarely compromise the ambient light-mood of a given situation. Look for one that lets you aim the flash in different directions, and try to find one that will meter a light situation on its own.
4) Turn on the lights. If you're ok with losing some of the romance of an image, turn on some more lights to give you some more flexibility when making your exposure choices.
5) Open up your aperture. You may find that a lot less in depth of field will give you a lot more in image clarity and exposure flexibility. Shooting at f2.8 with only a birthday cake lighting your subject will grant you many more valuable shutter stops that shooting the same with f5.6.
Remember, Rebecca, if you're shooting handheld, you must do everything in your power to shoot with the quickest shutter speed available. This will cut down on the blurriness of your indoor images.
--Hope this helps.

Oct 06, 2010 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

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I dont know if i can change the iso on the nixion n55??

You can't. If the film cartridge has the DX markings then the camera will automatically set it to the correct speed. Without the DX markings the camera goes to ISO 100. You can adjust this by using exposure compensation. For example, if you have ISO 200 film loaded without the DX markings, set the exposure compensation to -1.0 and you will get the proper exposure.

Oct 03, 2010 | Nikon N55 35mm SLR Camera

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I have a ricoh kr-30sp camera will not come on and what kind of film do I use

With the camera turned on, look in the viewfinder. Down on the bottom right side is an LCD display, if it's blank then your camera probably has dead batteries. It takes 2 x CR1/3N or 4 x SR44.

Your film accepts 35mm negative film or 35mm transparency (aka slide) film. It will accept any ISO from 12 to 3200, but in practice all you'll usually need are ISO 100, ISO 200 or ISO 400. You choose the film based upon lighting conditions and the lenses you'll be using, but in general you'll use ISO 100 if shooting mainly outdoors in daylight, ISO 400 if shooting in low light or with a telephoto lens, and ISO 200 is a general all-rounder good for most things. ISO is usually referred to as film speed as higher numbers need less exposure than lower numbers but the trade-off is a less detailed image.

To load film into your camera and to set the camera to match the film ISO setting refer to this link to the manual provided by Norman Butkus. The manual will also guide you through all other aspects of operating your camera.

I hope that I have fully answered your question, but if not please add a comment and I shall respond in due course. If your question has been answered, then please let me know by taking a moment to rate my answer.

Sep 15, 2010 | Ricoh KR-30SP 35mm SLR Camera

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How do I change the shutter speed on a Nikon EM film SLR

The EM doesn't really have a manual shutter speed setting. It does have a Bulb setting for long exposures and a 1/90 second manual for flash, but otherwise the camera automatically sets the shutter speed to go with the currently selected aperture.

Normally you would set the aperture and let the camera set the shutter speed. You can adjust the shutter speed by pressing the exposure compensation button for +2 stops. You can also adjust the exposure by changing the ASA/ISO setting.

If you need a manual, you can download one from

Jun 29, 2010 | Nikon EM 35mm SLR Camera

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X-370S 35mm SLR Camera: what is the best aperture, shutter speed and iso f...

Your camera light meter should tell you, but in case it doesn't work then all you need to remember is the "Sunny 16 Rule". Basically, on a bright day and with the lens aperture set to f16 you set the reciprocal of the film speed.

So with ISO 100 film the reciprocal is 1/100, or 1/100th of a second. Your camera shutter speed dial doesn't have that, but it does have 1/125th which is close enough.

Once you have the exposure set for f16 then if you adjust the aperture you simply adjust the shutter speed to match. So if you decide to set f11 that allows twice as much light onto the film so to compensate you reset the shutter speed to 1/250th of a second to halve the light coming in. As twice the light coming in through the aperture is compensated for by halving the light coming in via the shutter, the exposure remains the same.

Although this works for a sunny day, you just guess based on experience other lighting conditions. So if it's bright but overcast then you can leave things as they are, but if it's dull and overcast allow one extra stop of exposure by opening the aperture by one setting or by doubling the time that the shutter remains open. So from the starting point of f16 at 1/125 (as above), on a dull cloudy day you'd either set f11 OR 1/60. If you set f11 AND 1/60 then you'll be allowing not just twice as much light in but three times as much.

Hope this helps, if so please take a moment to rate my answer. If it's too complicated then please add a comment and I'll re-explain in even simpler terms.

May 18, 2010 | Minolta X-370S 35mm SLR Camera

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put simply the ISO number is how sensitive the film is to light, the higher the number the more sensitive the film. The ISO on the camera sets the exposure system to give the proper exposure for that film (the f/n80 usually sets the ISO automaticly). Also the higher the ISO the more grainy the picture, I would recommend using ISO 200 film for the pictures you describe. I would set the camera to the P setting it is a good all-around setting.

Nov 18, 2008 | Nikon F80 35mm SLR Camera

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Blurry pictures in Sports Mode

Well, Sports Mode is a fully automated mode, which I believe tries to balance the exposure toward faster shutter speeds. An over all dark photo indicates an underexposure. You can adjust for underexposure by dialing in a 1/2 stop or so on your exposure compensation dial.

However, dark AND blurry indicates that you just didn't have enough light. The first thing you want, for that same shooting situation, is some faster film. Go up at least an f-stop or two (eg, if you're shooting with ISO 100 film, try ISO 400).

Pay attention to the shutter speed the camera is setting. If you're stilling still, photographing action, you'll want a pretty fast shutter speed, or you WILL get blurring. I'd recommend at least 1/250th second, faster still if you're trying to freeze motion.

A more advanced technique is to pan with your subject. Follow the subject with the camera, and use a medium to medium fast shutter speed (1/60th-1/250th). You will get some blurring, but if you learn this well, your subject will be pretty clear, and the background will blur... thus including the suggestion of speed in the final photo, rather than something that looks frozen. That can deliver a much more satisfying shot.

I have used Canons for years, but I avoid all of the those special modes, like sports modes. They're really trying to deliver some help, but these are techniques you should learn in any basic photography course.

If you set the camera to Av mode, you can choose the widest aperture available for that lens, which will always get you the fastest possible shutter speed -- thus, the least chance of blurring. If you still blur, you need more light, a lower f-stop number, or faster film.. those are the only cures.

Nov 29, 2007 | Canon EOS Rebel Ti / 300V 35mm SLR Camera

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Turn it on

Actually, you don't have to "turn on" the Vivitar V3800N. Just be sure it has working batteries in it (takes two small alkaline button cells, unscrew the cover on the bottom with a coin--put new cells into the holder with the + side up). If the batteries are working, when you press the shutter button halfway down, you should see an LED light up in the right side of the viewfinder. This is the readout for the exposure meter: a red + indicates overexposure, red - is underexposure, a green dot means you've got the exposure correctly set. You just change the shutter and aperture settings until you get the green light, then shoot. When you load film, you also need to set the ISO film speed setting. Pull up on the outside ring of the shutter speed dial and turn it until the number in the window is the same as the ISO number on the film you are using. The batteries, by the way, only power the exposure meter. The shutter is fully mechanical (just like in the good old days), so you can use the camera without batteries if you have a separate exposure meter, or if you can estimate exposure. Film loading is about like any other 35mm manual camera: pull up on the rewind knob to open the back; insert the new cassette of film on the left and pull the film leader out a couple inches and hook the film to the takeup reel on the right. Move the film advance lever a bit to be sure the film is firmly hooked onto the reel, then close the back. Wind and shoot three shots to get the exposed film leader out of the way, and then start shooting. When the film is finished, press in the rewind button on the bottom of the camera and rewind the film into the cassette before opening the back of the camera. Good luck--these are pretty good little cameras. We buy a lot of them for the photography program where I teach, and I've only ever had one with a problem (meter was bad). The lenses are quite good, and they are "K-mount," which means that any Pentax bayonet lens, and gazillions of others with this mount, will all fit. --Michael R. Sawdey

Sep 03, 2007 | Vivitar V3800N Zoom 35mm SLR Camera

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Group portraits with fluorescent lighting

Appature settings are never precise because they constantly need to be adjusted to suit the individual lighting conditions, in other words it is impossible to make a blanket statement for the best fstop and shutter speed to use for florescent lighting since that would depend on the size of the room ambient light the number of florescent lights and the distance to the target. As a rule of thumb these cameras have reasonably good light sensors so setting them to auto and pressing the button halfway should show you a display of the recommended fstop and shutter settings. I would recommend then bracketing from these settings. Bracketing is the process of taking several shots while varying the exposure settings to "passthrough" the optimal settings. Usually if you have a good idea what exposure will work a three step bracket is all that is required.
Example (based on outdoor exposure):
Optimal settings show shutter at 500 fstop at 16
Bracket picture 1:
shutter 250 fstop 16
Picture 2:
Shutter 500 fstop 16
Picture 3:
Shutter 1000 fstop 16

There is also a handy rule of thumb for exposure settings
Note that this also changes based on type of film
See the following chart for iso 400 film fstop of 16:
Bright sunlight: shutter 1/2000 th or just 2000
Partly cloudy: about 1/500th or 500
Overcast:1/125th or 125
Medium source (open window on a sunny day): 60
Inside light: 30
Low light: 15 up to 1"
night: varying

Hope that helps

Mar 06, 2007 | Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera

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