Question about Pentax SF1n 35mm SLR Camera

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Exposure/ISO compensation Hi. 1. I shot 5 films with one battery. No problem. I just wanted to know how much longer will it take. 2. Haven't used exposure compensation and ISO changing mark. Want to know what will be the effects if I use these features and how this will help to my photos. thank you.

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Roscaion,

usually around 15 to 20 rolls of 36 exposure film. the iso compensation will either lighten or darken your prints. a good feature if you don't want to change depth of field. ( f-stop )

Posted on Dec 13, 2008

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I am shooting with a Nioon D200 and I have to shoot at 100 iso and 1.8 in the shade in the daytime.If I go over 200 all I have it dark pics no matter my f-stop.Is this a camera malfunction.( my friend...


If you're shooting: ISO 100, f1.4 @ 1/1000 second, it is the same as:
ISO 200, f1.4 @ 1/2000 second, or
ISO 400, f1.4 @ 1/4000 second, etc.. Because each time you double the ISO value, you need 1/2 the light for a proper exposure. The ISO is the camera sensor (or film) "sensitivity to light". The higher the ISO, the more sensitive it is. That's why in the examples above, the shutter is opened 1/2 as long (or it is twice as fast - whichever you like to look at it). But it doesn't stop there..

That same ISO 100, f1.4 @ 1/1000 second picture is also the same as:
ISO 100, f2.0 @ 1/2000 second, or
ISO 100, f2.8 @ 1/1000 second, or
ISO 100, f4.0 @ 1/500 second, etc.. This is because each FULL f-stop (1.4, 2.0, 2.8, 4.0, 5.6, 8.0, 11, 16, 22 and 32) each allow TWICE as much light than the previous (higher f-stop number). f1.4 allows 2x more light than 2.0, which allows 2x more than 2.8 which allows 2x more than 4.0, and so on. So, if you get twice the light from one aperture than the previous full f-stop, and the ISO is the same, then the length of time the shutter is open must be reduced by 1/2. Hence, 1/500 is half as long as 1/1000, which is half as long as /12000, etc.

It can be represented like the exposure triangle below:
steve_con_96.jpg
All this shows is that all three variables control the exposure. If your main objective is to change the Depth of Field (DoF), adjust Aperture and one or more of the others to get a properly exposed picture. Likewise, if you want to suggest or stop motion, you'd adjust shutter speed first - faster to stop the motion or slower to suggest motion by creating blur. ISO introduces grain to the image. The lower the the ISO value, the finer the grain is (may not even be perceptible). The smoothest color gradients come from the lowest ISO values - but they need to most light. A tripod may be needed unless shooting in direct sunlight or other brightly lit subject. ISO is a lifesaver for poorly lit subjects, night time photography, or other indoor shooting without a tripod or speedlight. The ability to shoot good looking pictures at ISO 3200 means that you need only 1/32 of the light needed when shooting at ISO 100. That means that under the right circumstances, you could hand hold the camera at ISO 3200 when the same picture taken at ISO 100 would take 32x longer. Of course, grain comes into the mix here. It may be too grainy for your likes. Experiment to how high you can set your ISO with acceptable results.

Below is a chart of the full shutter speeds, stops and ISO values. Many cameras break these down further into 1/3 steps for even more minute control. Basically, if you change the value of either shutter speed, f-stop or ISO values 1, 2, 3, 6, 9 - or however many steps - you need to adjust one or both of the others an equivalent amount to compensate to get a properly exposed picture.

steve_con_97.jpg

Lastly, make sure you haven't set exposure compensation to a negative value. Press and hold the the "+/-" button (has a green dot) on the top panel next to the shutter release button. Spin the rear thumb dial so that it is niether plus or minus. Minus makes the picture dark (underexposed) and Plus makes it brighter (overexposed).

I hope this was helpful and good luck! Please rate my reply - thanks!

Oct 12, 2011 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

I bought this canon rebel t2 film camera recently and used film with ASO 400. Portraits look ok. but the landscapes, especially the sky area look dark and grainy. I used ef 28-135mm usm lens. Any solutions...


That's odd that the pictures would be coming out under exposed unless the previous owner has gone into the camera functions and switched the ISO from auto to manual. Another reason is that the exposure compensation has been activated and set for - exposure

Under "normal" use the camera will read the DX code on the film canisters and adjust the ISO automatically. However the previous owner may have shut this off in preference to setting the ISO manually. Even though you have ISO 400 in the camera the ISO on in the camera setting may be ISO 1600.

Checking for the Auto ISO and exposure compensation is fairly easy as you can see the film canister through the film window or you know you have loaded 400 speed film. on the LCD panel at the back of the camera is an ISO icon and exposure compensation.

Make sure the ISO for the camera is the same as what you have loaded and if the exposure compensation is to the right of 0 then the resulting picture will be dark. Move this back to the Zero.

I wasn't able to find an exact manual (if you don't have one) for your camera but have found a camera with similar. Here is a ling for that manual.

http://www.butkus.org/chinon/canon/canon_eos_rebel_ti/canon_eos_rebel_ti.htm

Hope this was a help

Dec 18, 2010 | Canon EOS Rebel T2 with 28-90 lens 35mm...

1 Answer

I dont know if i can change the iso on the nixion n55??


You can't. If the film cartridge has the DX markings then the camera will automatically set it to the correct speed. Without the DX markings the camera goes to ISO 100. You can adjust this by using exposure compensation. For example, if you have ISO 200 film loaded without the DX markings, set the exposure compensation to -1.0 and you will get the proper exposure.

Oct 03, 2010 | Nikon N55 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Question on SnapSights waterproof camera


The SnapSights SS03 is a non waterproof camera supplied with 200 ISO film so you clearly have the SS01 model for 800 ISO. Both cameras have fixed aperture and shutter speed and rely on the wide exposure latitude of print film. 100 ISO is ideal if you have a camera with a wider aperture than yours, but if you use it then photos will be three stops underexposed; you'd possibly get away with this on land but underwater shots typically have more shadows than highlights and you'd lose a lot of photographic detail. By using 800 ISO the camera will produce photos which are noticeably grainy and with high contrast demonstrated by less detail in shadow areas and overexposed highlights, but for most purposes the photos will be acceptable and far better than none at all.

Colour negative film has a wide exposure latitude so you may wish to experiment with using 400 ISO or even 200 ISO. 400 will be one stop underexposed, but the printing stage can compensate to produce shots which are less grainy with better shadow details but which will lack some highlight detail. This can be partially compensated for if you tell the processing lab to "push process" your film at 800 ISO, but this will usually cost extra and for just one stop under I wouldn't bother, 200 ISO is really stretching it though and you may find that results are unacceptable unless you push process. Ultimately, it all depends upon how dark and how deep you go, but at much below 1,5m everything gets a strong blue colour cast anyway unless you use a powerful underwater strobe light mounted away from the lens axis.

Basically your camera is designed just to give you a taste of underwater photography and is very limited in what it can achieve. Even with a good specialist 35mm underwater camera such as the Sea & Sea MotorMarine II I usually find that I only have one or two usable shots on a 36 exposure roll, so if you do get the underwater photography bug then invest in a decent quality underwater digital model which accepts a proper external strobe lamp. The ratio of failed photos is similar, but at least you can review and delete them immediately without expense.

Jan 09, 2010 | SnapSights Intova Snap Sights SS03 Film...

2 Answers

I am using D90 with programe Auto ISO 400, in clear day sun light my picture get very dark, but on same settings in door with auto flash I get very clear result why?


ISO400 is too high of a sensitivity to use in full day light. Set the ISO outdoors to ISO100 and learn how to use your exposure compensation. The meter in the camera is easily fooled in bright contrasty conditions, so if you are getting consistantly darker shots outdoors increase the exposure compensation a stop or two. Another way is to learn how to use the camera in manual mode and you find you will have better control over the exposure.

Oct 21, 2009 | Nikon D90 Digital Camera with 18-105mm...

1 Answer

Lost manuel to canon powershot A630 and I wanted to know how to take a black and white picture.


By pressing the center button on the four-way controller, you'll open up the Function menu. This menu has the following options:
  • ISO speed (Auto, High ISO Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800) -
  • White balance (Auto, daylight, cloudy, tungsten, fluorescent, fluorescent H, underwater, custom) -
  • Drive (Single-shot, continuous, self-timer [2 or 10 sec, custom] -
  • My Colors (Off, vivid, neutral, sepia, black & white, positive film, lighter skin tone, darker skin tone, vivid blue, vivid green, vivid red, custom color) -
  • Flash exposure compensation (-2EV to +2EV in 1/3EV increments) - in manual mode you can adjust the flash strength in three steps (1/3, 2/3, full)
  • Metering (Evaluative, center-weighted, spot)
  • Compression
  • Resolution
- Lisa

http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/powershot_a630_a640-review/

Feb 26, 2009 | Canon PowerShot A630 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Night and low-light specialty/experimental photography


Hello, thanks for the compliments!

First, yes, the Digital Rebel series of cameras (my first DSLR was the first Digital Rebel, the 300D model) have a small sensor than a "full frame" sensor, which results in a "multiplicationfactor" or "crop factor" of .6. This is good for telephoto shots (yourtelephoto lens ends up acting like a "longer" and more expensive lens) but bad for wideangle shots.

For Macro, you need very bright light to have enough light to use a small fstop for needed DoF because even at the smallest fstop (largest number) your DoF will still be very small. This typically means you need to use a strobe. The strobe will help freeze the image so you can still shoot hand-held. For hand-held use look for a "ring strobe" that fits around your lens and lights the item in front of your lens.

Focusing is a very tricky matter when you are shooting in macro. Usually you go to manual focus, set the lens to manually focus at either infinity or the closest distance, then you "focus" using the zoom, rather than the focus ring.

For night shots, you need to change to manual exposure and adjust to get the exposure you desire. Your camera's light meter doesn't know how bright or dark the thing you are viewing is - to the light meter everything you point it at is supposed to be exposed to medium gray - an average value. It can't know that you want a dark shot to stay dark.

Here's how I do it. First, I bump up the ISO so I can take a fast shot, and I set the camera to AV mode. Then I set the lens to the widest aperture (smallest number). I let the camera set the shutter speed as I take this test shot, and look at the exposure. Then I determine if I want the shot darker and if so how much. Now I switch to manual mode - same aperture and shutter as the previous shot, and adjust the shutter speed faster to produce a darker image. When I have the right settings, then I adjust the ISO and as I adjust the ISO I have to compensate with the shutter. E.g. if I have a good exposure at ISO 1600 @ f2.8 @ 1/30, to drop to ISO 100 means I have to slow the shutter to 1/2 second. Now, I usually also want a smaller aperture (larger number). To go from ISO 100 @ f2/8 @ 1/2 second to f/16 is 6 stops, which takes the time needed from 1/2 second to 15 seconds. Obviously this means the camera needs to be on a tripod.

I can help more if you can give me a link to some of the photos you have taken so far so I can see what you are shooting, and make suggestions for how I would approach the same subject and situation.

Dec 15, 2008 | Canon EOS Rebel XSi Digital Camera

3 Answers

Nikon NEWBIE


put simply the ISO number is how sensitive the film is to light, the higher the number the more sensitive the film. The ISO on the camera sets the exposure system to give the proper exposure for that film (the f/n80 usually sets the ISO automaticly). Also the higher the ISO the more grainy the picture, I would recommend using ISO 200 film for the pictures you describe. I would set the camera to the P setting it is a good all-around setting.

Nov 18, 2008 | Nikon F80 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

How do i change ISO/ASA on the nikon N65?


The ISO is automatically set by the DX code on your film canister - if there is no code, the camera sets ISO 100. If you load canisters yourself with, say ISO 400 film, you can adjust the exposure using the exposure compensation button at the top right side of the LCD ( " +/- " ). Using ISO 400 film set the +/- to minus 2 ( -2 ) so that it will UNDEREXPOSE 2 stops since the film is 2 stops ( 4X ) more sensitive than ISO 100 film.

Nov 18, 2008 | Nikon Cameras

2 Answers

C-2100UZ and low light


If you don't need a zoom, the best film P & S that you can get for what you described is an Olympus! It is the Olympus Stylus Epic which has a very sharp 35 mm f2.8 lens. The f2.8 lens with an ISO 800 or the new ISO 1600 film should fit your bill for low light, fast shutter speed photography. B & H has it for $80. Popular Photography magazine once called it the biggest bargain of all times for no-flash photography.

Sep 11, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-2100 Ultra Zoom Digital...

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