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I have a wood burning stove fitted in our modern home. The stove has a vertical flue pipe fitted from the top and up through a purpouse built chimney liner in the ceiling. the lower parts of the system are enamal pipe and the remaining parts are stainless steel liner. We have just started using the stove again for the second season and this time we have lots of sticky black tar dripping and running down the OUTSIDE of the flue, eventually dripping down to the top plate of the stove creating horrible smoke and fumes. The flue was cleaned recently. Firstly, what is causing the tar? and secodnly why is it coming down the outside and can it be stopped? Thanks in advance

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(1) The lower "enamel" pipe is possibly Ceramic coated pipe, used for high temperature flue applications.
(2) The "stickey black tar" is creasote. Whoever installed the flue pipe did it wrong. It needs to be reversed so that the "Crimped" end of the pipe is pointing down. That way the creasote will drain back into the stove and get burned up.

Posted on Apr 02, 2017

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 1462 Answers

SOURCE: I have just fitted a

i have seen this problem solved by fitting a fan at the top of the chimney - sounds daft but it worked. was in a house in france

Posted on Sep 01, 2008

Richie_asg1
  • 1036 Answers

SOURCE: Water and debris in flue liner of Jotul Stove

Hi,
You should have a swept T connector at the base, with the sweep going from the stove upwards, but the other end of the T going into a removable cap - or very short length of pipe. If you only have a standard bend - replace it with the T.

This is actually normal for wood burners. In an unlined chimney, the lighter "tar" fractions from the wood would soak into the brickwork, and show through the wall in a few years. In a lined system - they have to go somewhere, and usually condense inside the flue - running back down to the base.
The "chinese hat" style cap is actually very good for everything except sideways hail.

Sorry - but it's the nature of the fuel. It is possible to use a clay based absorbent at the base - Cat litter is actually fine.

Posted on Jan 03, 2009

gasman44
  • 83 Answers

SOURCE: I have just opened up my chimney and took it back

Hi,

You will need to install a flue liner ( i know its a nuisance) to allow the products of combustion to escape as quickly and as safely as possible.

If you installed a gas appliance without a liner, due to the temperature of the flue gases (lower than solid fuel) the emissions would struggle to exit via the flue terminal.

If you install the appliance following the manufacturers instructions, you cannot go wrong. The other recommendation is get a 'Gas Safe' engineer to carry out the commssioning/testing.(house insurance void if not certified)

I hope this helps.

Posted on Jul 07, 2009

Therinnaiguy
  • 1420 Answers

SOURCE: does the chimney need a

If the fuel is either wood (or any wood products) or oil it is required to have a stainless steel liner. Gas burning appliances need an Aluminum liner. Make sure it is sized correctly and not over sized.

Posted on Feb 17, 2011

  • 4736 Answers

SOURCE: i have a sfw 55

It may be the type of coal you're burning. Have you tried burning anthracite coal rather than Bituminous coal? It's a little more expensive, but it burns cleaner. Also, you may need to open the air intake a bit with what you're currently burning. That way it will burn a little hotter and hopefully cleaner.

Posted on Mar 07, 2011

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Water and debris in flue liner of Jotul Stove


Hi,
You should have a swept T connector at the base, with the sweep going from the stove upwards, but the other end of the T going into a removable cap - or very short length of pipe. If you only have a standard bend - replace it with the T.

This is actually normal for wood burners. In an unlined chimney, the lighter "tar" fractions from the wood would soak into the brickwork, and show through the wall in a few years. In a lined system - they have to go somewhere, and usually condense inside the flue - running back down to the base.
The "chinese hat" style cap is actually very good for everything except sideways hail.

Sorry - but it's the nature of the fuel. It is possible to use a clay based absorbent at the base - Cat litter is actually fine.

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