Question about Hotpoint RGB745 Gas Kitchen Range

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Stove Top Burners

I have GE JGBS23DEMWW, i converted it to LP gas and everything works well, with the exception that the burners run great on high, but i cant seem to turn then down enough to simmer, is there an adjustment screw someplace?

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  • tporritt Oct 22, 2008

    It had a conversion kit with it.

  • tporritt Oct 23, 2008

    When I turn it to simmer, the flame does not reduce alot (about 1/2 flame) rather then just a small ring of fire., on the lowest setting it appears that the flame is over double what it should be.

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Was the stove design for LP????
you need to get a convertion kit form the manufature, if you convert the natual to LP gas.

Posted on Oct 22, 2008

  • Frank
    Frank Oct 23, 2008

    open the top of the stove. adjust the airflow at the neck just behind of the selector.

    what happen when you turn it to simmer????

  • Frank
    Frank Oct 23, 2008

    OK here is what I want you to do, first read the write up, then think back, each of steps that you have taken during the conversion, and then take a look if all the steps and items need to be replaced is replaced and all the adjustments are done, if that can't fix the porblem you have, then you need to take to the vendor whom sold you the conversion kit, there are things missing.



    There are basically two types of ranges to deal with: those with sealed top burners, which are pretty much the standard today, and the conventional, 'non-sealed' ones.

    While they operate in much the same way, their conversion is usually different. There are still a few ranges that use adjustable sealed burner orifices, but most are 'fixed' and must be individually replaced to convert each burner from one fuel to another.

    (An orifice is simply a small brass fitting with a specifically sized hole very accurately drilled through it, and, if adjustable, has a provision to change the size of this hole by turning closed a threaded portion).


    Either way, basically what you're doing when going from natural gas to LP is changing to a smaller orifice to allow for the higher pressure supplied by the 'bottled' gas (The available energy in each ft of gas is different. Natural gas supplies typically run around a pressure of 5.5 inches water column, while LP runs at twice that pressure, averaging around 11 inches. The orifice through which the gas travels to the burner must be smaller to accommodate this difference.

    Adjustable orifices are simply 'snugged' down, clockwise, with a 1/2 inch open-end wrench, to convert them.

    Fixed orifices are replaced, (Check the stove or your manual, see if the stove comes with PL orifices. the unused set is attached to a storage point on the stove).
    However, these little top burner orifices very often require a metric wrench to remove & install. And some can't be changed without a very slender wrench or nut driver.


    Note: Hold that little orifice in a regular nut driver or socket, tear a very small piece of paper towel, hold it over the open socket, then push the orifice into the socket. The paper does a great job of holding the orifice into the wrench, preventing its being dropped into the range.

    There are also the “simmer settings”. Each top burner valve has a small screw inside its shaft that can be adjusted to provide a low simmer. This adjustment must be made on each burner once the range has been converted, or 'simmer' settings will be far too high to be useful.

    A small-bladed screwdriver is needed for most of these. If you can't find one small enough, it's possible to grind one down to fit.

    First convert the regulator. This is the part to which the inlet connects. Remove the vent cap, flip the insert over and reinsert it (You'll usually see 'NAT' on one side and 'LP' on the other). Reinstall the cap, and that's done.

    Then, find the brass orifice that supplies the bake burner (usually under the range, behind the drawer), and if included, the broil burner (usually inside the oven). These are adjustable, and, like adjustable top burners, are simply 'snugged' down clockwise with a 1/2 inch wrench.

    good luck!

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