Question about Nikon Cameras

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My 18-55 VR NIKKON lense on VR MODE changes focus area after each shot on same object on even tripod. why ?

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  • Nikon Expert
  • 362 Answers

Have you set your camera to the correct auto-focus mode; AF-A, AF-S or AF-C?

Posted on Jun 18, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Nikon D40x AF-S Nikkor 18-55 mm 1:3.5-5.6 GII ED Lense Trouble

I've found the same thing with my D40x and the 18-55mm AF-S lens. I took a really close look at it and found that the mount on the lens is badly worn on all three of the bayonet tangs and one is cracked at the base. What happens in my case is that the lens has movement when mounted on the camera - just enough to stop the contacts from mating properly. Hence, no photos. Am taking it to Nikon to get it fixed. I suggest if this is your problem, that you take it to the repair man.

Posted on Dec 10, 2008

randy320sgi
  • 121 Answers

SOURCE: nikon af-s 18-70 dx autofocus problem

ff1esta,
Moving a camera from cold to warm after it has been in the cold for a long time will cause condensation to form. It's a good idea if you can to allow the camera and lenses to gradually warm up. Like first in a garage or enclosed porch in the bag before binging them into a warm place. Since you have the moisture in it now you have to allow it to get out, the electrical components are at risk, the condensation or fog may have caused the lens not to be able to focus. remove the lens from the camera body and let both sit to air out. Since it's been over a week now if there is still some moisture you may want to get the camera into a shop to be cleaned and inspected to avoid corrosion.
randy320sgi

Posted on Jan 18, 2009

fblock
  • 289 Answers

SOURCE: Auto focus at full zoom not responding Nikon D80 with 18-200mm VR

Hi - I own this lens and it manually focuses at all focal lengths (hard to see at 18mm unless your subject is extremly close). You may need to get the lens checked. BTW - Mine was set as follows when I checked for you:

  • D80 was "on"
  • M/A
  • VR = Off
  • Normal (not Active)
Hope this helps!

Posted on Apr 24, 2009

  • 13 Answers

SOURCE: Nikon DX AF- S Nikkor 18-55 mm lens won't Auto focus

Is the switch on the side of the lens set to manual or auto? Sometimes it's the little things like this that we don't notice.

Posted on Jun 12, 2009

  • 146 Answers

SOURCE: Nikon 18-55 zoom lens doesn't autofocus

You might like to check if the A/M slider switch on the lens by the Nikon label is set to A.
It sometimes gets moved accidently.
Set to M the lens will not autofocus.

Posted on Jul 04, 2009

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I get blurred indication on display and the pictures clicked are dark and not clear.


1. Your shutter speed's too slow

Take the effective focal length of your lens and divide it into 1 to get the minimum safe handheld shutter speed you should use. For example, with a 200mm equivalent lens, you shouldn't shoot any slower than 1/200sec or you risk camera shake. You might even get some shake at 1/500sec.

2. You're placing too much trust in VR

Nikon's Vibration Reduction system can let you shoot with shutter speeds four stops slower than usual - but don't count on it. This is a best-case scenario, and it's wise to assume no more than two stops. VR improves your success rate, it doesn't guarantee sharpness.

3. Your subject is moving

Moving subjects will appear blurred at slow shutter speeds, so even if you can hold your camera steady and even if the VR system does a great job, you will still need to use fast shutter speeds for moving subjects.

4. The ISO is too high

Sometimes you have to use really high ISOs just to avoid camera shake, but be aware that at the highest settings you will see a loss of detail. The camera uses noise reduction processes to reduce the appearance of noise, and these erode fine detail too.

field myths

Depth of field is the zone of near-to-far sharpness within your pictures, but it's only apparent sharpness, not real sharpness. Depth of field relies on objects looking sharp enough at normal viewing distances and magnifications even though they're ever so slightly out of focus. If you zoom in far enough, you will see that some objects aren't completely sharp even when they're technically within the depth of field limits.

6. Your lens aperture is too small

Small apertures used to be associated with better image quality. That was when lenses were comparatively unsophisticated and cameras used larger formats, such as 35mm and 120 roll film. But at small apertures an unavoidable optical effect called 'diffraction' sets in, where fine detail starts to blur. With today's smaller sensors and sophisticated zoom lens designs, you can see this as early as f/11. If you shoot at f/16 or f/22, your shots will be visibly softer than those shot at wider apertures.

7. You're focused on the wrong thing

Watch the AF points in the camera's viewfinder. If you're using auto-area AF, the camera will pick the nearest subject, which may not be what you intended. If you're using single-point AF, make sure the AF point's over the correct part of the scene. Tip: on some cameras, including the D3100, it's very easy to accidentally push the AF point to the right with the base of your thumb as you hold the camera and not notice.

8. Handheld close-ups shots are risky!

When you're really close to your subject, the depth of field is so small that the slightest movement on your part will throw your subject out of focus. The more you concentrate on staying still, the more you sway! Higher shutter speeds won't make the slightest difference - you need a tripod.

9. Focus/recompose errors

It's often useful to focus on one thing then keep the shutter button half-pressed so that you can recompose the picture and shoot. But in that time, you may have moved, the subject may have moved or, if the camera's in its default AF-A mode, it make think the subject is moving, switch to AF-C (continuous) operation and attempt to re-focus.

10. Is your lens clean?

If you walk into a humid indoor environment, your lens may mist up, producing a blurry, soft-focus effect. Other causes of blur are greasy smears and fingermarks - so check the front of your lens before blaming the camera.

Aug 02, 2015 | Cameras

1 Answer

My D70s is not taking sharp, clear pictures anymore - everything is a little unfocused. I even changed lenses and the problem is still there.


Hi Sarah,

When you compose a shot, and depress the shutter button 1/2 way - you should hear the focus motor run to find the best focus. You should also see the image eventually become sharper in the veiwfinder, during this time. Focus can only occur when there is sufficient contrast. If the area is dimly lit, the D70's focus assist lamp should come on (unless disabled in the menu) to help bring out enough contrast for focusing. It has limitations however.. it too dark, distant or still lacks contrast, the camera will not be able to focus. This is usually a problem for night time shots or poorly lit indoor shots with slower lenes. You shouldn't run into this problem on bright, sunny days or with a fast, prime lens.

The D70 and many Nikon lenses for that matter, have the ability to switch between AF and M focus modes. An image of the switches is below:

steve_con_80.jpg
It is important that BOTH switches not be in the M position. Different lenses have different designations for Auto Focus. The one pictured on the lens allows for manual override when the lens is in the M/A position. This simply means you can twist the focus ring on the lens without first needing to change the position of the switch to M. It is a nice, handy feature. Other lenses without the M/A position would require that the switch be moved first, an additional step that could be the difference in getting the shot - or not.

Make sure you're not trying to hand-hold the camera when the shutter "1 / 1.5 x Focal length". That is, if you're shoot at 100mm, you should use a tripod if the shutter speed is 1/150 sec. If at 300mm it would be 1/450 (or 1/500) of a second. At 50mm you should be 1/60 - 1/100 of a second. That's just a guide.. some people can hold it steadier than others and the new vibration control built in to lenses can lower that shutter speed too. If you're running into that as a problem, bump your ISO up one and try again.

THose are a couple of things to check out. Hopefully, one will solve your problem. Good luck! please rate my reply - thanks!

Aug 01, 2011 | Nikon D70s Digital Camera

1 Answer

Our Canon Power shot A95 is used to take close up photos of jewellery ,with a white background.We have been useing the TV mode with the MF to focus.Howerev the pictures are over enposed, what can we do to...


Instead of shutter priority "Tv" mode, try setting to program "P" mode instead. Also, turn off the flash, and set to macro if shooting close-in (press downward on the little flower icon on the back disk). If pictures come out blurry, try using a tripod to hold the camera steady, or set the camera down on an object so it doesn't move while taking the shot. Try using the timer to activate the shutter to allow the camera to remain even steadier for the shot.

Feb 13, 2011 | Canon PowerShot A95 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Image is too dark nikkon swm vr ed


Having received no response in over a month, I assume this is no longer a problem.

Aug 06, 2010 | Nikon Zoom-Nikkor 55-200mm f/4-5.6G IF-ED...

1 Answer

Nikkor af-s 18-200 VR not focusing


Please check your focus settings in the camera menu. Play around with the focus point from Single to 11 points. Also, try Auto mode as a quick way to test if the focus is working

Sep 26, 2009 | Nikon 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 G ED-IF AF-S VR...

1 Answer

At 300mm motor keep on turning even if focus already


Your motor maybe going bad. Try sending it to PhotoTech Repair Service in NYC. They are Nikon authorized, and can do the repair under warranty if you still have it. Also if you join they're facebook page, they will give you a 10% discount.
Here is the facebook page link, it has everything you need to send it in.
http://www.facebook.com/pages/New-York-NY/PhotoTech-Repair-Service-Inc/102527215194

Jun 19, 2009 | Cameras

1 Answer

Lens will not focus


Your motor may have gone bad. Try sending it to PhotoTech Repair Service in NYC. They are Nikon authorized, and can do the repair under warranty if you still have it. Also if you join they're facebook page, they will give you a 10% discount.
Here is the facebook page link, it has everything you need to send it in.
http://www.facebook.com/pages/New-York-NY/PhotoTech-Repair-Service-Inc/102527215194

May 17, 2009 | Nikon Zoom Tele 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6 D-AF VR...

1 Answer

Error message in D 90 camera


I had the same problem (same kit). I even exchanged the kit for a new one, and had the same issue. I'm convinced it's the connection between the camera and the lense - when I wiggled the lense, it would sometimes return to normal. I considered cleaning the contact points, but then the problem went away. I've been shooting hundreds of times, without it happening once.

May 01, 2009 | Nikon D90 Digital Camera with 18-105mm...

1 Answer

Nikon AF-s VR zoom-Nikkor 70-300mm


First the auto focus motor is in the body and not the lens so that will not be the problem. Unless you dropped the lens the problem is probably in the focus gear interface inside the lens ( it is stuck in the manual drive --that is why no autofocus-- and there is something preventing normal gear operation). Seems like a small problem but will require a look at the rear of the lens where the gear box is situated.

Sep 06, 2007 | Nikon Zoom Tele 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6 D-AF VR...

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