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I have an old stereo amplifier (purchased about 25 years ago). The left sound channel is no longer sending a signal to the speaker. I reversed the speaker connections which confirmed that the problem was the amplifier and not the speaker. Is this a fixable problem, can I find a repair shop to do this, or should I replace my amplifier.

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Try checking the speaker fuses inside the amp (a fairly inexpensive fix).

Posted on Jun 01, 2009

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I have an old Philips Amplifier which I bought 18 years ago. The Amp actually can handle 5 speakers but I only connect 2 speakers (L & R). When I play certain DVD, although the background music sounds...


If you identified the specific products involved we (and you) might be able to look at the documentation and verify the obvious answer. Voice is generally concentrated on the center channel, so, yes, a speaker there would be a good idea.

If you don't have a multi-channel rig you shouldn't feed multichannel audio to it. Maybe use the unidentified DVD player's analog output and make sure it's set to mix the channels down to stereo.

Jul 01, 2011 | Philips Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Htddw7600, brand new, sub amp is not working, only way to get any bass sound is to unplug the sub cable from back of main amp and touch it on side of sub out port.


H?,
You have a very good system...one of the best of SONY..SUB does not get activated automatically especially on STEREO mode.DIRECT STEREO Notes • No sound will be output from the subwoofer.
.your system has Dedicated Power Amplifier for 2 Externally Driven Sub-Woofers (200W RMS x 2)..in order to activate the sub woofer amplifier you need to make a selection on the surround modes while you are switching the modes of the surround you will see the speaker position on the display of receiver as well..if you do not see the sub woofer it wont be activated..Sound Field Program (A.F.D) is a good example to test it..
Take care and please Remember to rate/vote and give me 4 Thumbs Up
for Helping out the Community :)

Hope this helps!

--------------------
Additionally please follow the instruction on your user manual to activate the SUB ,as is follows..

-----------------
BASS-OUT
Low-frequency (bass) signals can be directed to the
subwoofer and/or the front left and right speakers
according to the characteristics of your system. This
setting also determines the routing of the LFE (low-
frequency effect) signals found in Dolby Digital or DTS
sources.
Choices: SWFR (subwoofer), FRONT, BOTH
• Select SWFR if you connect a subwoofer. LFE and
low-frequency signals from other channels are directed
to the subwoofer according to the speaker settings.
• Select FRONT if you do not use a subwoofer. LFE and
low-frequency signals from other channels are directed
to the front speakers according to the speaker settings
(even if you have previously set the front speakers to
SML).
• Select BOTH if you connect a subwoofer and you want
to output low-frequency signals from front channels to
both the front speakers and subwoofer. LFE and low-
frequency signals from other channels are also directed
to the subwoofer according to the speaker settings. Use
this function to reinforce low-frequency signals using
the subwoofer when playing back sources such as CDs.

Jun 23, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

I have a LG47" tv


Your DVD audio is sent directly to your receiver - not to you TV. That's why you can hear the audio on your stereo. The TV audio is not being sent anywhere - it is "stuck" in the TV and is amplified and sent to the TV speakers. Since the TV speakers are off, you don't hear anything. In order to listen to the TV audio on the stereo system's speakers, you need to send it to the receiver.

You need to have a pair (left + right signals) of audio cables (assuming you wish to listen to stereo sound) from the TV's Audio Output jacks to a pair of Audio Input jacks on the receiver / amplifier. You can use any unused input - CD, Video, Tape, Sat, etc. If you use Tape or Sat audio inputs, when you wish to listen to the TV audio, you must select the Tape or Sat input on the receiver.

Do not send more than one signal to a set of inputs on the receiver. Typically, a CD, DVD and Sat inputs offer two or more of the following types 1) Analog audio. These are the older RCA jacks that have been around since the beginning and require separate cables for left and right channels. 2) Optical inputs. This is the newer digital interface that provides for Dolby Digital (and others) format sound over a single fiber optic cable. 3) Coaxial inputs. This jacks looks like an RCA jack, but usually has an Orange ring - instead of the Red & White rings that analog RCA jacks have. They use a single coaxial cable. 4) HDMI input. This jacks carries both digital video and digital audio signals. If you are using an Optical input for the DVD on the receiver, do not use any other unused analog or digital inputs associated with the DVD to "piggyback" another device like a CD , VHS tape, etc.

I hope this helps and good luck! Please rate my reply. Thank you.

Mar 25, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Theres no sound coming through the speaker ports .


At first consideration, the question appears a little vague. Any sound amplifier other than a simple two channel stereo system requires the appropriate driver signal(5.1, 6.1 et al ) in order to output sound to all speaker ports. If a stereo signal is fed in you will not get 5.1 or 6.1 or any other of the multiple speaker channel outputs from the speakers. The 5.1 or 6.1 etc. source signal must be provided on the medium you are playing or receiving for you to be able to hear it outputted on all speaker channels.
If on the other hand you mean that "There is no sound whatever coming through any of the speaker ports no matter what you play into the amp" then the whole thing would need to be checked from input to output by a Technician to determine at which point the source signal is being lost on its way through the entire circuitry.
In this case I would recommend you arrange for an fixed fee inspection which might include a minor repair up to that amount if that is what is found to be necessary.

Feb 27, 2011 | Yamaha DSP-A1 Receiver

1 Answer

Some DVD's sound fine whilst others have background sounds but no voices. I do have an old model TV that has mono sound.Would that cause it?


" Some DVD\'s sound fine whilst others have background sounds but no voices. I do have an old model TV that has mono sound.Would that cause it? "
Hi,
I wrote a short article for someone who had a similar problem a few days ago.
I will edit it for you so that it fits. Here it is.
Your DVD player should have output connectors in the back of it to plug your amplifier or receiver into. If you have a Stereo system (no surround sound speakers, or front center speaker) connect the DVD Audio Cables on the back of the DVD player to the STEREO (or MIXED ) Output Jacks. If it is connected to the Left Front and Right Front jacks of the "Surround Sound" output jacks instead of Stereo(or MIXED) then the dialog will be sent to the CENTER channel output. If you have no center channel speaker you will not hear it. Thus no dialog.
NOTE: In your case for the TV that is mono, here is the solution.
1 Connect a stereo pair of RCA cables (red and white "male" connectors at each end) to the Mixed or Stereo Output of the DVD player (NOT ANY SURROUND OUTPUTS).
2 Purchase an RCA type "Y" connector that has 2 female to a single male connectors on it. Walmart about 3 dollars.
3 Plug the single male plug of the Y connector into the back of the TV set's single mono audio input.
4 Connect the stereo RCA pair from the MIXED output of the DVD player into the Y connector that is now on the back of yourTV.
5 Run your yellow Video output from the DVD into the Back of the Set's yellow input.
That should do it. The sound should be clear and correct with dialog, effects and music.
Hope this helps,
Best,
Mark

Jan 27, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

My mac is hooked up to my receiver via analog cables. I have never had any problems, but now for some reason when in stereo mode I only get sound out of the right speaker. I'm only looking for 2.1 sound...


The most common problem at cases like yours is the jack to RCA cable that connects your mac to the Denon amplifier. This is a cable like this:
technical114_6.jpg
Usually there is an internal cut at one of the ends. Check this cable and in case of a problem replace it; it's very cheap. A quick test is to reverse the RCA jacks at the amplifier's side; if you get sound from the left speaker you can be sure that one channel of the cable is faulty. At the "virtual mode" your system is trying to create a stereo image so it's logical to have "pseudo" audio from the left speaker.

In case of a problem or clarification, don't hesitate to post me a reply before rejecting my answer.
If you are satisfied, rate my solution with the "thumbs" or (even better) add a testimonial.

Thanks and regards
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Dec 31, 2010 | Denon AVR-1601 Receiver

1 Answer

How do I connect old jensen speakers to a technics m222 duel cassette deck


You have to send your signal out through an amplifier of course. The amplifier is what has the "speaker out" jacks on it's back. The cassette deck and the amplifier have connections through low-level signal cables (patch cords) which are ususally 3 or 6 feet par of cables which are red and white (referencing right and left signal channels).
An alternative is the hook earphones to your jack on the front to listen to if you do not have an amplifier to connect to.

mrstan

Aug 29, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Looking for a good amplifier


Any 2-channel (or greater) receiver or integrated amp with at least one Tape Monitor loop; or any separate amplifier - will work. I would look fror one with true > 100 watts per channel, all channels driven, 20-20000kz + a few dB, with less than 0.5% Total Harmonic Distortion (in other words clean and powerful) should suffice. Specific brands don't matter. I'm partial to old Carver amps.

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However, should you get a multi-channel amp for the 901's you will be limited to using only 901's on it as the required Active Equalizer would affect all speakers attached to the amp, and conventional speakers would not sound right and could possibly be harmed by it's drastically-altered frequency response. Since using the Tape Monitor on modern DSP Receivers disables their digital inputs, that would limit what you could listen to, should you later decide to go with Cable Box, DVD, SACD, DVD-Audio, Blu-Ray, DTS etc.

* There are no some multichannel receivers out there that allow separating the preamp-amp circuitry for each channel to allow for differences in speaker processing. I think Marantz had one.

However, having a 901-based multichannel setup myself, I would highly recommend getting the Full Monte for video listening (below)...

In that case a separate stereo amp for the 901's would work. I run a Carver AV-406 (5-channel amp) for my 901's in Front, 2 Subwoofers and the Rear Surround channel, with the Active EQ between the receiver Front L&R Outputs and the 901's amp channels. My receiver controls everything and just drives the Center and Surround speakers.

You could get by with just a stereo amp for the 901's. A Carver M-200 is a good efficient amplifier that would have you cooking just fine (2x100W). Run it with the Active EQ between the receiver Front L&R Pre-Outputs ** and the 901's amp channels.

** Front Pre Out (or one of your analog Tape Outs) >>> Bose EQ Amplifer IN, then
Bose EQ Amplier OUT >>> new amplifier IN.


Attach the 901's to the new amp, set its volume to Max and run through your receiver's speaker level setup.

Write off the Tape Out as an input if you use it to extract the Front L&R channels. DO NOT monitor it or you'll chop the 901's out of the signal path AND kill any digital source audio in the receiver.

---------

So to sum it up, I think you should start with a powerful, clean amp with few bells and whistles for the 901's and maybe later add a multichannel receiver with all the magicfor source control, DSP and to drive the other channels.




Jan 05, 2009 | Onkyo TX-DS747

1 Answer

SX-1600 + KD-491F


Hi again,

It would seem that you posted the problem here also. With your kind permission, I will repost my excerpts of my responses that others may benefit on similar concerns.

A. Most current receivers no longer include a PHONO input. Perhaps what could be done is to purchase a phono to line level pre-amplifier to go along in your purchase for a new receiver.

I was made to understand that the Pioneer SX-1600 is prone to speaker output problems which could either be:
1. the speaker relay (protection); and/or
2. the amp, STK4191II Stereo Module.

Either should be relatively easy to work on and perhaps you can try the services of a locally available qualified electronic technician since the repairs would not be too specialized. The service manual may be of help (or at least a schematic , they may be downloaded from here and here).

B. To recap what you need is a receiver that can accommodate:
4 - Pioneer S-DF1-K (15-100W, 8 ohms)
1 - Pioneer PD-F407 25 Disc CD Player
1 - Pioneer CT-300 dual tape deck
1 - Kenwood KD-491F turntable

C. Possible choices are (keeping in mind that the power output should be less if not equal to 100 watts and a turntable/phono input):
i. Onkyo TX-8522 Stereo Receiver;
ii. Yamaha RX-397 100 Watt Natural Sound AM/FM Stereo Receiver;
iii. Sony STR DE695 AV receiver;
iv. Teac AG-790 200 Watt Stereo Receiver;
v. Denon AVR 888 - AV receiver - 7.1 channel.

Some of the above also includes feature(s) to hook up to your video system. Some may even require a fifth speaker (subwoofer).

Incidentally, you can also choose another brand/model even without a turntable/phono input. As initially posted, a turntable/phone to line level pre-amplifier is only required. Here are some examples:
a. XP200 Turntable Preamp - Nano Series;
b. Pyle® Pro PP999 Phono Preamplifier;
c. Pro-Ject Phono Box Turntable Preamplifier;
d. Radial J33 RIAA Turntable Preamp Direct Box

Good luck with your project.

Apr 29, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

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