Question about Cambridge Soundworks Center/Surround IV Satellite Speaker

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Is there any way to take these apart?

I feel like theres a loose connection inside my center speaker because at heavy bass sounds it glitches and can be fixed if tapped. The connection in the back is not the problem so I was wondering if there was a way I could open it and fix whatever is wrong

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Re: Is there any way to take these apart?

If there are no screws evident on the rear of the unit carefully remove the grill on the front. Usually they are just lightly glued on. Most quality speaker enclosures open from the front and the speaker can be taken out for access to the wiring inside. If you cannot find any way in from the front look for some sort of plug or cover over screws. This could be on the back or under the grill. Sometimes they are covered with plastic covers which match the surface. If you do not have access any of these ways this could be a sealed unit which is not made to take apart. Good luck.

Posted on Jul 12, 2006

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Why is there four plugs on the back of speakers?

With four plug you will have a jumper from on plug to the other. (e.g. Positive to positive and negative to negative.) This is for single connection (two wires.) If you use two connections (four wires) you take out the jumpers. the bottom pair is normally for the bass and the top for treble. This is to make the speakers clearer, and sound better. As for louder,? I don't know some people think it does some don't. With better clarity of sound, you do get the feeling of it being louder.

Apr 27, 2012 | Speakers & Subwoofers

2 Answers

I turn on my subwoofer and the volume is turned down and it makes a loud buzzing sound, and its not even hooked up to the amp, just pluged in. Thank you, Joel Arntsen

You might have blown the speaker. This happens when you play things too loudly and you ruin the speaker inside. You can test this by playing something with a decent amount of bass and turned up a bit. If you hear like a "rattle" in the sound or like something isn't right in the heavy bass notes, then you definitely blew the speaker out. This isn't a tragedy. They're fixable if you bring them to a place that repairs speakers. But I would definitely test it first by hooking it up and playing a loud song with a lot of bass. Hope that helps a little! Please rate my solution!
- Frankie

May 06, 2011 | KLH ASW10-100 Subwoofer

1 Answer

No sound from tweeter bx5a

First of all, never connect the audio from your receiver directly to the tweeter. You can blow the tweeter instantly. The mid-bass driver can be damaged from a direct connection as well.

Since you get absolutely no sound from either driver, this seems to implicate the crossover. If the crossover has opened, no signal gets through, if it has opened early in the signal path.

But, it is also possible that a short exists, and that perhaps your amp cuts off the output having sensed a short. The short could be in the crossover or one of the drivers.

Here are some troubleshooting tips--

To prevent damage to your amp, turn it off while making or breaking any connections inside the speaker boxes.

Write down which wires get connected to which place on the drivers, so you can get them back where they belong.

With your amp turned off, connect the bad speaker to your amp. You've already verified that no sound is produced when both drivers are connected.

So, with your amp off, disconnect one wire from the tweeter in the bad box.

Briefly turn your amp on and listen for sound.

If you get sound, the tweeter is shorted.

If you get no sound, with the amp off, reconnect the tweeter in the bad box and disconnect one wire from the mid-bass driver.

Briefly turn the amp on and listen before turning the amp off.

If you get sound now, but not before, the mid-bass driver is shorted.

If you got no sound either way, check the DC resistance of the mid-bass driver (only, not the tweeter. Ohmmeters put out a small DC voltage to test resistance. That DC voltage might damage a tweeter, maybe. Don't risk it). Ohm the mid-bass driver while it is not connected to the crossover. If the driver is good, you should read some ohms--a little less than the stated impedance. An 8 ohm driver might read 6.5 ohms, for instance. If you get an open or a short (with the crossover disconnected from the mid-bass driver) you have a blown driver. Two actually, since neither the tweeter nor the mid-bass driver produced any sound in the previous tests.

If you can't get ahold of an ohmmeter, try this--

Open the good, working speaker and place the two side by side.

Connect your amp to the bad speaker box only.

With your amp turned off, disconnect the wires from the mid-bass driver in the bad box and connect them to the mid-bass driver in the good box. Disconnect one of the wires from the "good" mid-bass driver first, so you don't have two crossovers connected to it at the same time--even if only one of them will get powered on. It keeps the confusion down to a minimum when trying to isolate your problem. Oh, and disconnect one wire from the bad tweeter, in case it is shorted.

Turn the amp on and listen briefly before turning the amp off.

If you got sound, the "bad" crossover is fine, but the "bad" mid-bass driver is blown. And, since you got no sound in the previous tests, the "bad" tweeter is blown, as well.

If you got no sound, try it the other way around. Meaning--

With the amp off, disconnect the speaker wires coming from your amp from the bad speaker box and connect them to the good speaker box.

Your amp is now connected only to the good speaker box.

With the amp still off, connect the mid-bass wires from the good box to the mid-bass driver in the bad box. Remember to disconnect one of the "bad" crossover wires from its own driver first, so only one crossover is connected to the "bad" mid-midbass driver. Remember to disconnect one wire from the "good" and "bad" tweeters, so the only sound you hear--if any--is from the "bad" mid-bass driver, powered by the "good" crossover.

If this produces sound, but the previous attempts failed, you have a crossover problem.

If you still get no sound, something went wrong and you need to retest the good speaker by itself and back up a few steps and try again.

Assuming you got sound from the "good" crossover while it was driving your "bad" mid-bass, make sure no wires have come loose inside the "bad" box. Assuming you have sound connections at each end of each wire, you now need to desolder the electrolytic capacitors from the circuit board.

Make sure you mark them first, so you can put them back where they belong.

You can remove only one at a time, if that helps.

Use an ohmmeter to check some components.

The big red coil should read pretty close to a short, maybe one ohm.

The capacitors should read open or infinite resistance, although you might see a steadily increasing resistance while the capacitor charges up from the ohmmeter. If you read a steady low resistance on a capacitor after it has been removed from the circuit board, that capacitor is bad and must be replaced. The markings on the capacitor should give you some clues as to the proper replacement.

All things considered, I suspect that your problem is a shorted electrolytic capacitor. But, I gave you all I could think of so you can narrow it down and isolate the problem, whatever it might be.

I hope this helps.

Feb 23, 2011 | M-Audio BX5a Speaker

1 Answer

My PS-8 subwoofer keeps loosing its signal and the bass turns on and off. I have to hit the side and it come back. Anyone have any idea WTF is going on?

Obviously there is a loose connection inside (no known issue) and if you feel qualified you can remove the amplifier from the cabinet and see if you can locate the problem.


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Nov 20, 2010 | Infinity PS-8 Subwoofer

1 Answer

The subwoofer just quit working the green light is on sound comes out (here voices) the subwoofer no bass

if the light still comes on then the fuse is still good....

a possiblity exists that either the amplifier or the actual speaker itself went bad....if you like you can dissasemble the the subwoofer to access the insides....a simple test....if you connect the driver to another amp (any amp will do as this is just a test) and it makes sound then chances are your amp is bad or just a loose connection.

Aug 30, 2010 | Sony SA-VF700ED Speaker

1 Answer

I have a Celestion CSW Sub woofer. It powers on as the light lights up but I get no sound i checked the fuse and it seems to be great and intact. I also checked the actual driver to see if it was blown or...

This speaker has a low frequency roll-off filter. Does your program source have low enough frequencies to pass through the filter? The effect of the subwoofer on most music is very subtle unless there is heavy bass in the source. You should try some songs that have a heavy under beat.

How are you driving the CSW -- by way of the line input or as a series connection to your full range speakers?

Jul 13, 2010 | Celestion CSW Speaker

1 Answer

Bose Lifestyle 35 Accoustimass module rattles at high volume

Well to be hones 85 sounds pretty loud to me, generally the bose acoustimass module shouldnt really be distorting or crackling unless under extremely high sound levels.

It could possibley be that the speaker cone in the bass module has a slight perforation so it would distort at high levels. However other problems could be loose connections inside the unt or outside the unit. If your friend doesnt have it above 85 under normal circumstances I wouldnt worry to much about it but if there is a tear in the cone the problem could get worse.

Nov 27, 2008 | Bose Acoustimass 15 System

1 Answer

Bose cinemate acoustimass module

try taking ones apart that have the rumbling and see if theres anything loose inside

Jan 21, 2008 | Bose Cinemate Digital Home Theater System...

2 Answers

Sound problems through subwoofer

check all speakers wires andcheck test mode. every thing ok, may be input wiring problem ,check every thing after that internalcircuit may be problem..

Oct 08, 2007 | Speakers & Subwoofers

1 Answer

Is there any way to take these apart?

Is it a powered speaker? If not then if you know how to solder ,sure open her up and move around the wires while shes playing and see if you can duplicate the fault. If you dont know how to solder then take the unit in to be serviced as a loose connection inside a speaker can certainly blow out an amps output circuitry. Good Luck

Jun 25, 2006 | Cambridge Soundworks Center/Surround IV...

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