Question about Air Conditioners

2 Answers

Natural gas fireplace, pilot lights fine, won't kick on main burner. Remote ok, hear click when remote temperature is elevaled above current.

Posted by on

2 Answers

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that gotĀ 5 achievements.

    Novelist:

    An expert who has written 50 answers of more than 400 characters.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 20 times.

  • Expert
  • 124 Answers

Thermocouple is bad . replace it.

Posted on Oct 19, 2008

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

  • Contributor
  • 1 Answer

Our gas fireplace's pilot light is on, but when I turn the switch, the fire doesn't come on. It used to come on after turning on the switch and off and on etc. Now nothing.

Posted on Nov 12, 2008

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Fireplace with Eurosit gas valve. Pilot is lit but fireplace only kicks on if an ice pack is applied to the probe.


icing at the jet indicates that there is liquid gas at that point and as it tries to boil off into gas the surrounding humidity is freezing the hole (jet)
get a gas appliance fitter in to check the regulator and the system for faults and go from there

Sep 01, 2015 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

Looking to find out if my gas fireplace unit has a "milli volt gas valve" to change it to a remote control unit. Model # CGG363OP Is this remote capable and if so can you sell me a remote for...


Marty, I would really like to help you, but the DESA/Comfort Glow Model Number you listed is incorrect. Please check & confirm it and get back to me.

To visually tell if your gas control valve is Millivolt or not. First, look at the pilot assembly. If it has a thermopile attached to the top of the pilot, it's millivolt controlled. If you are currently using a wall switch to turn the burner ON, it's millivolt controlled. If the control valve has 3-electrical terminals on the side of it, it's millivolt controlled.

As far as selling you a remote control kit is concerned, we at FixYa do not sell any products of any type. But, you can buy them from a hearth store in your area or online. I would recommend looking for a SkyTech Remote Control Kit, as they are one of, if not the best on the market. Plus, they come in a a host of models depending on what you want the remote control to do.

Hope this helps you and thanks for choosing FixYa.

Sep 08, 2011 | Desa International Air Conditioners

1 Answer

Gas fireplace wont stay lit- it is a sealed unit so can taccess the pilot or gas holes in the logs. is it safe to remove glass panel?


Yes, removing the glass is safe, if you do it carefully, so as not to break it. Put it well out of your way, after removing it. In fact, removing it is the only way to access and service the Pilot Assembly and the Burners.

If the pilot won't stay lit, there are several things that can cause this on a Direct Vent Gas Fireplace:
  • The direct vent on the outside of the house is block or clogged.
  • Wind is blowing back through the direct vent, blowing out the pilot.
  • Low gas pressure
  • A dirty pilot.
  • The thermocouple and/or Thermopile (part of the pilot assembly) has failed.
If you can provide me with the make and model number of your gas fireplace, I may be able to furnish you with an Owners Manual, that will help you to continue to troubleshoot the problem.

Hope this helped you.

Apr 29, 2011 | Air Conditioners

2 Answers

I turned on hot water to take a bath, and it was hot. by the time the tub had filled the water was freezing. now we cant seem to get hot water out of anywhere. the pilot light is on. the knob is set to on,...


if I was a betting may I would say that this is a small water heater, what is the temperature set on, as the pilot light will be lit once the temperature is reached, but until then the burners will be lit. I would move the temperature knob and listen to see if I hear the burners kick on. Hope this helps Tim

Apr 17, 2011 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

I replaced the gasvalve and thermalpile in my 35,BTU wall heater I light the pilot and turn the heat on it goes out I ran a new state wire in case of a short but it still does it, did I get a bad...


Did you get the right gas valve for a thermapile and not a 24 volt gas valve? Also I would recheck my wiring.... Here is a article that may be of HELP....... Hope this Helps.....
Thermocouple: A thermocouple is a device made of two different metals which creates a small electrical charge when heated at one end.
Thermopile: A thermopile is a probe that contains multiple thermocouples, therefore it can produce a larger electrical current. Millivolts: 1/1000 of a volt - thermocouples and thermopiles typically produce from 25 to 600 millivolts of power.
Piezio - a spark producing device often used to ignite gas pilots and burners.
Gas Valves Types:
A. Single Thermocouple Only - Used on some gas logs
B. Valves with Thermocouples and Thermopiles - Used on most hearth appliances and gas logs with switches or remote controls or thermostats.
C. ODS Systems - Used on Mostly Vent-Free. Available in manual control or thermostat/remote/switch (combination) valves.
valvepict.jpg
Typical Gas Valve A. Thermocouple-Only
Found in: Most gas log sets with standard safety pilot knob control. Also found in certain gas space heaters and construction-site portable heaters.
Explanation: This type of gas valve used a single thermocouple. A thermocouple is a device made of two different metals which creates a small electrical charge when heated at one end by the gas pilot. This small charge causes an electromagnet inside the gas valve to open and allow gas to flow to the main burners. Since the thermocouple must be heated before the burner will start, gas appliances often have a startup mode, during which a knob must be depressed and held for 30 seconds or so after lighting the pilot. At the end of the 30 seconds, the pilot should be generating enough electricity for the valve to operate correctly. At this time, the startup knob can be released and the valve turned to an "on" position for appliance operation.
pilotclose.gif Troubleshooting:
Most problems with this type of valve are due to thermocouple problems. Check the following:
1. Connection from the thermocouple to the valve. Clean the threads of the connecting nut with a pencil eraser and re-tighten.
2. Pilot hood and flame direction. The pilot should engulf the top 5/8" of the thermocouple with a decent flame. If the flame hits the thermocouple too low, this can cause the appliance to go out or not generate enough millivolts for valve operation. The pilot hood and orifice should also be clean from soot which could slow or block the pilot flame.
3. Pilot pressure. Many of these valves have an adjustment screw to adjust the pilot flame. A pilot that is too short may allow the pilot to stay lit after ignition, but may not create enough charge to allow the burners to ignite.
4. Overheating: If the unit works for a few hours and then shuts down, it's possible the thermocouple has become overheated. Repositioning of the gas valve and/or pilot may be needed to avoid this problem.
Problems with LP units can also be due to a tank that is nearly empty or a bad regulator at the tank.
B. Thermocouple & Thermopile valve
gas1.gif Found in: Most modern VENTED gas stoves, fireplaces and fireplace inserts as well as vented gas log sets with thermostat or remote control.
This valve is similar to the thermocouple only valve, however has a pilot which heats up BOTH a thermocouple and a thermopile. The thermocouple still acts to prove that the pilot flame is on and allows this flame to continue after startup. The thermopile is used to power a second circuit which is used to open the main valve. This second circuit is powerful enough (300-600 millivolts) to allow the use of a thermostat, wall switch or control switch to operate the main valve. Control of the valve is obtained simply by hooking a pair of wires to two terminals located on the valve.
Startup is similar to the thermocouple-only valve. A piezo spark ignition is used to ignite the pilot after the gas knob is turned to the "pilot" position and depressed. Once the pilot is lit, the knob is held in for 30 seconds to "prove" the heat and then released and turned from the "pilot" to the "on" position. The main burner will then respond to the switch, thermostat or remote control.
Troubleshooting
Since there is both a thermocouple and thermopile in this valve type, it is important to isolate where the potential problem may be. If the pilot can be lit and stays on after the knob is released, then the problem is probably with the thermopile side of the valve. Here are the most common problems and solutions.
1. Pilot does not light or stay lit after knob is released - Make certain that the Piezo igniter works by checking for a spark between the igniter tip and the pilot hood. If there is no spark, the piezo may be bad or the piezo wire might be shorting to the appliance chassis. It is also possible that the igniter tip needs to be bent slightly toward the pilot hood so the spark jumps to it.
Check carefully that gas to appliance is on and that the valve is in he correct (pilot) position and fully depressed when lighting.
If pilot ignites but does not stay lit after knob is released, then the problem is with the thermocouple not generating enough voltage to the valve. It may be that the pilot adjustment needs to be turned up, or the thermocouple replaced. Another possibility is that the thermocouple may not be being "bathed" fully by the pilot flame. Check your owners manual for a diagram and description of the proper pilot flame and hood adjustment. It is also possible that there is soot or other blockage in the pilot tube, orifice or hood which is reducing the size of the pilot (and also the voltage of the thermocouple).
2. Pilot stays lit, but appliance will not turn on - There are two common causes for this. It is possible that the thermopile is not producing enough millivolts to power the control circuit. The millivolts can be checked with a simple voltmeter (consult the owners manual for proper setting) and adjusted with the pilot adjustment screw. Improper millivolts will also cause the appliance to shut down in the middle of operation.
Another common problem is loose or poor connections or circuits to your appliance switch, thermostat or remote transceiver. This can be isolated by simply using a small piece of wire to jump the "TP" and "TH" terminals located on these valves. If the appliance turns on when these terminals are jumped, then you can be sure that your problem is not in the appliance itself, but further down the switch circuit. Make certain you have used the suggested gauge of wire and that the length for your control runs does not exceed the specs given in your manual.
3. Other possible problems - include wind or back drafts affecting the pilot flame and checking of "spillage" circuits which may be wired into the valve in most B-Vent units.
If all the above checks out, and your valve is still acting weird (i.e., works some of the time), then you may have a defective gas valve in the appliance. Problems with LP units can also be due to a tank that is nearly empty or a bad regulator at the tank.
C. ODS System
Found in: Unvented (Ventless, Vent free) gas logs, fireplaces and stoves. These systems are available in manual or remote control.
ods.gif ODS stands for "Oxygen Depletion Sensor" , a term which accurately describes this valve type. The valve itself is similar in many ways to the two valve types above...with one exception. The pilot tube is a precision mechanism that creates a very stable flame as long as the room air contains the proper amount of oxygen. If the oxygen level in the room air drops even slightly, the pilot becomes unstable and lifts off of the thermocouple (see diagram) causing the gas valve and appliance to cease operation. This type of valve is very reliable, and there have been very few failures of this system - even with tens of millions in use worldwide.

Mar 02, 2011 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

Ventless gas fire place runs fin on low setting but will shut down on the high setting after 20min or so.


If it's a Remote Controlled unit and uses a radio frequency remote control, the unit may be overheating.
They are heat sensitive and will shut down the burner if the temp reaches 160 degrees.
If it is a Remote Controlled Gas Fireplace as stated. Move the Receiver Box as far out from the gas logs and off to side as much as the wiring will allow. If you have a lower louvered control compartment, the remote receiver should be down inside there. However, it doesn't get hot there.

If your is not Remote Controlled, the Oxygen Depletion Sensor (ODS) which is part of the pilot assembly may be partially clogged with dust, lint and/or pet hair and will need to be cleaned out.
Remember, Vent-free Gas Appliances use interior air for combustion. So whatever is floating in your household air goes into the fireplace. burners, pilot, etc and clogs it up. By the same token, the oxygen level in the room air may be too low, when you run the burner on high and the ODS is doing exactly what it should.

Finally, the Thermocouple (which is another safety feature) may be loose where it connects into the Gas Control Valve and is loosing contact when the burner is on high.

If you still have your Owners Manual for you Gas Fireplace, consult it's Trouble Shooting Guide, as well as the section on Maintenance. Both sections will be of great help in allowing you to perform the necessary things.

If you don't have your Owners Manual go online to the Manufacturer's website. There you can download the Owners Manual for your Model in a pdf format and print it.

If you don't know who the manufacturer is ... look in the fireplace or the lower control compartment for some metal or plastic tags, which should be wired to the controls. One of those tags (look on both sides of the tags) will tell you who the manufacturer is, the model number and the serial number.

Hope this helps you solve your problem.

Feb 15, 2011 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

Used since 9/23/05 and was fine. Now I can light the pilot and it stays on fine. Turn on logs and NOTHING! I have a remote and it has new batteries and turns the switch and you can hear the poomp when the...


Hi, when you say that when you turn on the switch to the on position to fire the logs, is this poomp you hear a short burst of gas igniting? If it is and it doesn't stay on, this is a sign of your manifold pressure being to high, or also the burners are plugged as we call this poomp, pre- ignition, or delayed. We know that the thermocouple is good as the pilot is staying light and you have a good strong pilot flame, so if the main gas valve is trying to lite by this poof you are hearing, the problem would more then likely be dirty or plugged burners/burner and that's where I would be looking to clean out. Now, if you hit the switch and you hear a noise but no gas starts to flow, the problem would be in the main gas valve coil opening for a split second or just clicking and not opening. In this case, your gas valve has failed you. It would be a standard valve that you could pick up at any appliance parts house, millivolt that you could replace your self. In any case, it just sounds as though you need to get to the burner or burners and check to see if the have built up soot over the last 5 years. I don't believe it is anything serious that you can't repair. A little TLC should take care of your problem. Please don't forget to rate me, and please leave a comment for me under my user name below. I would really like to know what you find and I will be hear if this doesn't solve your problem, but I am confident it will if you do the things I have asked.
Sincerely,
Shastalaker7
A/C, & Heating Contractor

Oct 08, 2010 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

I have a Trane gas furnace BLU080E, pilot light remain on set the thermostat above room temperature fan start runing after few minutes but main burners remain off and have 24 volt on gas valve.


almost a classic sign of a bad gas valve. pilot is lit so gas is available. FAN COMES ON AND 24 VOLTS TO gas valve so there is a call for heat . gas valve doesn't open so it looks like its bad.

Nov 10, 2008 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

1986 Weathermaker SX 150 series, model S85X060-CC-1


There are 4 -steps for full run time to kick in a furnace.. step-1, inducer fan runs & prove thru the air tube which closes a switch and tell the circuit board to go to step-2, the igniter lights the pilot & prove its lit by heating the thermocouple, which tells the circuit board to go to step-3, opens the gas valve to dump gas in, which will light from the pilot light, and prove by a flame sensor metal stick on the last burner , which heats up and tell the circuit board Saying, ok , I've got flame.. step-4. when the box heats up, it closes a switch and turn on the main fan...! (Some gas-valves has a brain -or circuit board on top of them and are real sensetive to moisture..)

Sep 05, 2008 | Air Conditioners

Not finding what you are looking for?
Air Conditioners Logo

Related Topics:

302 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Air Conditioners Experts

Dan Webster
Dan Webster

Level 3 Expert

8147 Answers

Bill Long

Level 3 Expert

577 Answers

Tim Whalen

Level 3 Expert

3056 Answers

Are you an Air Conditioner Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...