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Irq dma err

IRQ, DMA, and other Computer Creatures

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IRQ's (Interrupt Request) LinesIRQ's are hotlines to the main computer (CPU) that allow devices connected to the computer to signal the CPU that they need immediate attention. If you're a Batman fan, think of IRQ's as the Batphone - getting his attention immediately. 
Not all devices require IRQ lines, which is good news because in modern (post IBM XT) computers, we only have 16 of them. Of those, 3 are already dedicated to the main system board itself - the system timer, keyboard, and memory parity error signal. That leaves only 13 for all the other devices connected to your computer. This is why IRQ conflicts are probably the #1 problem faced by computer users when they add hardware to their computer.  


 

Its a general rule for ISA-type systems (the standard computer architecture used in most IBM compatible systems) that IRQ lines CANNOT by shared with multiple devices except under special circumstances. For this reason, a good understanding of what IRQ's are assigned to what devices is essential in avoiding conflicts. The table below is a general outline for standard IRQ assignments.IRQ DEVICE USED in AT, 386, 486, and Pentium Computers
0 System Timer
1 Keyboard Controller
2 Tied to IRQs 8-15
3 COM 2
4 COM 1
5 LPT2 or Sound Card
6 Floppy Diskette Controller
7 LPT 1
8 Real Time Clock
9 Substitutes for IRQ 2
10 Not Assigned
11 Not Assigned
12 PS/2 Mouse Port
13 NPU (Numerical Processing Unit)
14 Primary Hard Disk Controller
15 Secondary Hard Disk Controller


Depending on the computer's configuration, add-in devices such as SCSI controllers, sound cards, modems, cd-roms, etc. will want an IRQ line that is already used by another device, and thus we have what is commonly referred to as an IRQ Conflict. 

The most common IRQ conflicts seem to be between two COM ports, generally a mouse and modem conflict that ends up freezing the mouse whenever the modem is activated. The table below explains each IRQ and the most common devices each may use.

Posted on Oct 18, 2008

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How can I translate the motherboard beeps on startup


AMI Beep Codes

Beep Code Meaning
1. beep DRAM refresh failure. There is a problem in the system memory or the motherboard.
2. beeps Memory parity error. The parity circuit is not working properly.
3. beeps Base 64K RAM failure. There is a problem with the first 64K of system memory.
4. beeps system timer not operational. There is problem with the timer(s) that control functions on the motherboard.
5. beeps Processor failure. The system CPU has failed.
6. beeps Gate A20/keyboard controller failure. The keyboard IC controller has failed, preventing gate A20 from switching the processor to protect mode.
7. beeps Virtual mode exception error.
8. beeps Video memory error. The BIOS cannot write to the frame buffer memory on the video card.
9. beeps ROM checksum error. The BIOS ROM chip on the motherboard is likely faulty.
10. beeps CMOS checksum error. Something on the motherboard is causing an error when trying to interact with the CMOS.
11. beeps Bad cache memory. An error in the level 2 cache memory.

1 long beep, 2 short Failure in the video system.
1 long beep, 3 short A failure in the video system.
1 long beep, 8 short display test failure.
Continuous beeping A problem with the memory or video.
BIOS Beep Codes

Phoenix Beep Codes

Phoenix uses sequences of beeps to indicate problems. The "-" between each number below indicates a pause between each beep sequence.
For example, 1-2-3 indicates one beep, followed by a pause and three beeps. Phoenix version before 4.x use 3-beep codes, while Phoenix versions starting with 4.x use 4-beep codes.
Click here for AMI BIOS beep codes.
4-Beep Codes

Beep Code Meaning
1-1-1-3 Faulty CPU/motherboard. Verify real mode.
1-1-2-1 Faulty CPU/motherboard.
1-1-2-3 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
1-1-3-1 Faulty motherboard or one of its components. Initialize chipset registers with initial POST values.
1-1-3-2 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
1-1-3-3 Faulty motherboard or one of its components. Initialize CPU registers.
1-1-3-2
1-1-3-3
1-1-3-4 Failure in the first 64K of memory.
1-1-4-1 Level 2 cache error.
1-1-4-3 I/O port error.
1-2-1-1 Power management error.
1-2-1-2
1-2-1-3 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
1-2-2-1 Keyboard controller failure.
1-2-2-3 BIOS ROM error.
1-2-3-1 System timer error.
1-2-3-3 DMA error.
1-2-4-1 IRQ controller error.
1-3-1-1 DRAM refresh error.
1-3-1-3 A20 gate failure.
1-3-2-1 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
1-3-3-1 Extended memory error.
1-3-3-3
1-3-4-1
1-3-4-3 Error in first 1MB of system memory.
1-4-1-3
1-4-2-4 CPU error.
1-4-3-1
2-1-4-1 BIOS ROM shadow error.
1-4-3-2
1-4-3-3 Level 2 cache error.
1-4-4-1
1-4-4-2
2-1-1-1 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
2-1-1-3
2-1-2-1 IRQ failure.
2-1-2-3 BIOS ROM error.
2-1-2-4
2-1-3-2 I/O port failure.
2-1-3-1
2-1-3-3 Video system failure.
2-1-1-3
2-1-2-1 IRQ failure.
2-1-2-3 BIOS ROM error.
2-1-2-4 I/O port failure.
2-1-4-3
2-2-1-1 Video card failure.
2-2-1-3
2-2-2-1
2-2-2-3 Keyboard controller failure.
2-2-3-1 IRQ error.
2-2-4-1 Error in first 1MB of system memory.
2-3-1-1
2-3-3-3 Extended memory failure.
2-3-2-1 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
2-3-2-3
2-3-3-1 Level 2 cache error.
2-3-4-1
2-3-4-3 Motherboard or video card failure.
2-3-4-1
2-3-4-3
2-4-1-1 Motherboard or video card failure.
2-4-1-3 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
2-4-2-1 RTC error.
2-4-2-3 Keyboard controller error.
2-4-4-1 IRQ error.
3-1-1-1
3-1-1-3
3-1-2-1
3-1-2-3 I/O port error.
3-1-3-1
3-1-3-3 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
3-1-4-1
3-2-1-1
3-2-1-2 Floppy drive or hard drive failure.
3-2-1-3 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
3-2-2-1 Keyboard controller error.
3-2-2-3
3-2-3-1
3-2-4-1 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
3-2-4-3 IRQ error.
3-3-1-1 RTC error.
3-3-1-3 Key lock error.
3-3-3-3 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
3-3-3-3
3-3-4-1
3-3-4-3
3-4-1-1
3-4-1-3
3-4-2-1
3-4-2-3
3-4-3-1
3-4-4-1
3-4-4-4 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
4-1-1-1 Floppy drive or hard drive failure.
4-2-1-1
4-2-1-3
4-2-2-1 IRQ failure.
4-2-2-3
4-2-3-1
4-2-3-3
4-2-4-1 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
4-2-4-3 Keyboard controller error.
4-3-1-3
4-3-1-4
4-3-2-1
4-3-2-2
4-3-3-1
4-3-4-1
4-3-4-3 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
4-3-3-2
4-3-3-4 IRQ failure.
4-3-3-3
4-3-4-2 Floppy drive or hard drive failure.
3-Beep Codes
Beep Code Meaning
1-1-2 Faulty CPU/motherboard.
1-1-3 Faulty motherboard/CMOS read-write failure.
1-1-4 Faulty BIOS/BIOS ROM checksum error.
1-2-1 System timer not operational. There is a problem with the timer(s) that control functions on the motherboard.
1-2-2
1-2-3 Faulty motherboard/DMA failure.
1-3-1 Memory refresh failure.
1-3-2
1-3-3
1-3-4 Failure in the first 64K of memory.
1-4-1 Address line failure.
1-4-2 Parity RAM failure.
1-4-3 Timer failure.
1-4-4 NMI port failure.
2-_-_ Any combination of beeps after 2 indicates a failure in the first 64K of memory.
3-1-1 Master DMA failure.
3-1-2 Slave DMA failure.
3-1-3
3-1-4 Interrupt controller failure.
3-2-4 Keyboard controller failure.
3-3-1
3-3-2 CMOS error.
3-3-4 Video card failure.
3-4-1 Video card failure.
4-2-1 Timer failure.
4-2-2 CMOS shutdown failure.
4-2-3 Gate A20 failure.
4-2-4 Unexpected interrupt in protected mode.
4-3-1 RAM test failure.
4-3-3 Timer failure.
4-3-4 Time of day clock failure.
4-4-1 Serial port failure.
4-4-2 Parallel port failure.
4-4-3 Math coprocessor.

Jul 26, 2012 | Sony VAIO PCV-RX850 (T99861067) PC Desktop

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10 reasons why PCs crash-You must know tip 1


You have just been struck by the Blue Screen of Death.

1 Hardware conflict

The number one reason why Windows crashes is hardware conflict. Each hardware device communicates to other devices through an interrupt request channel (IRQ). These are supposed to be unique for each device.

For example, a printer usually connects internally on IRQ 7. The keyboard usually uses IRQ 1 and the floppy disk drive IRQ 6. Each device will try to hog a single IRQ for itself.

If there are a lot of devices, or if they are not installed properly, two of them may end up sharing the same IRQ number. When the user tries to use both devices at the same time, a crash can happen. The way to check if your computer has a hardware conflict is through the following route:

* Start-Settings-Control Panel-System-Device Manager.

Often if a device has a problem a yellow '!' appears next to its description in the Device Manager. Highlight Computer (in the Device Manager) and press Properties to see the IRQ numbers used by your computer. If the IRQ number appears twice, two devices may be using it.

Sometimes a device might share an IRQ with something described as 'IRQ holder for PCI steering'. This can be ignored. The best way to fix this problem is to remove the problem device and reinstall it.

Sometimes you may have to find more recent drivers on the internet to make the device function properly. A good resource is www.driverguide.com. If the device is a soundcard, or a modem, it can often be fixed by moving it to a different slot on the motherboard (be careful about opening your computer, as you may void the warranty).

on Mar 04, 2010 | PC Desktops

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Things You Must Know To Avoid PC Crash Part 1



Fatal error: the system has become unstable or is busy," it says. "Enter to return to Windows or press Control-Alt-Delete to restart your computer. If you do this you will lose any unsaved information in all open applications."
You have just been struck by the Blue Screen of Death. Anyone who uses Mcft Windows will be familiar with this. What can you do? More importantly, how can you prevent it happening?
1 Hardware conflict
The number one reason why Windows crashes is hardware conflict. Each hardware device communicates to other devices through an interrupt request channel (IRQ). These are supposed to be unique for each device.
For example, a printer usually connects internally on IRQ 7. The keyboard usually uses IRQ 1 and the floppy disk drive IRQ 6. Each device will try to hog a single IRQ for itself.
If there are a lot of devices, or if they are not installed properly, two of them may end up sharing the same IRQ number. When the user tries to use both devices at the same time, a crash can happen. The way to check if your computer has a hardware conflict is through the following route:
* Start-Settings-Control Panel-System-Device Manager.
Often if a device has a problem a yellow '!' appears next to its description in the Device Manager. Highlight Computer (in the Device Manager) and press Properties to see the IRQ numbers used by your computer. If the IRQ number appears twice, two devices may be using it.
Sometimes a device might share an IRQ with something described as 'IRQ holder for PCI steering'. This can be ignored. The best way to fix this problem is to remove the problem device and reinstall it.
Sometimes you may have to find more recent drivers on the internet to make the device function properly. A good resource is www.driverguide.com. If the device is a soundcard, or a modem, it can often be fixed by moving it to a different slot on the motherboard (be careful about opening your computer, as you may void the warranty).
When working inside a computer you should switch it off, unplug the mains lead and touch an unpainted metal surface to discharge any static electricity.
To be fair to Mcft, the problem with IRQ numbers is not of its making. It is a legacy problem going back to the first PC designs using the IBM 8086 chip. Initially there were only eight IRQs. Today there are 16 IRQs in a PC. It is easy to run out of them. There are plans to increase the number of IRQs in future designs.
2 Bad Ram

Ram (random-access memory) problems might bring on the blue screen of death with a message saying Fatal Exception Error. A fatal error indicates a serious hardware problem. Sometimes it may mean a part is damaged and will need replacing.
But a fatal error caused by Ram might be caused by a mismatch of chips. For example, mixing 70-nanosecond (70ns) Ram with 60ns Ram will usually force the computer to run all the Ram at the slower speed. This will often crash the machine if the Ram is overworked.
One way around this problem is to enter the BIOS settings and increase the wait state of the Ram. This can make it more stable. Another way to troubleshoot a suspected Ram problem is to rearrange the Ram chips on the motherboard, or take some of them out. Then try to repeat the circumstances that caused the crash. When handling Ram try not to touch the gold connections, as they can be easily damaged.
Parity error messages also refer to Ram. Modern Ram chips are either parity (ECC) or non parity (non-ECC). It is best not to mix the two types, as this can be a cause of trouble.
EMM386 error messages refer to memory problems but may not be connected to bad Ram. This may be due to free memory problems often linked to old Dos-based programmes.
3 BIOS settings
Every motherboard is supplied with a range of chipset settings that are decided in the factory. A common way to access these settings is to press the F2 or delete button during the first few seconds of a boot-up.
Once inside the BIOS, great care should be taken. It is a good idea to write down on a piece of paper all the settings that appear on the screen. That way, if you change something and the computer becomes more unstable, you will know what settings to revert to.
A common BIOS error concerns the CAS latency. This refers to the Ram. Older EDO (extended data out) Ram has a CAS latency of 3. Newer SDRam has a CAS latency of 2. Setting the wrong figure can cause the Ram to lock up and freeze the computer's display.
Mcft Windows is better at allocating IRQ numbers than any BIOS. If possible set the IRQ numbers to Auto in the BIOS. This will allow Windows to allocate the IRQ numbers (make sure the BIOS setting for Plug and Play OS is switched to 'yes' to allow Windows to do this.).

on Feb 02, 2010 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

Where is the DMA located in the computer?


The swettings for DMA can be often found in the BIOS

getting into the bios itself varies by computer model but the common method is to press DEL (delete) repeatedly during switch on until it is shown.

Some computers may use other keys eg. F2 etc and quite often it may tell you on the bottom or top of the screen as you power on

the setting itself can often be found under the hard drive settings and may even refer to UDMA.

Some Bios have a single DMA / UDMA setting that you may have to look for in there.

This setting can greatly increase the hard drive and CD ROm access times for your benefit.

Mar 16, 2011 | Acer Aspire™ T180 PC Desktop

1 Answer

I have Integrated sound card but there is no sound or vol. icon control appear on my widows and on device manager their is an yellow exlamination mark


hi im josh in cebu phils.may i help you? Friend try to use these solutions of mine it will help you for sure Problem: Your New Sound Card Doesn't Work—You Don't Get Any Sound Let's look at the simple stuff first. Is the card installed properly in your system unit? Have you connected the audio cable from your sound card to your CD-ROM/DVD drive? Are speakers (or headphones) hooked up to the card? Are the speakers plugged in and turned on? (And are they plugged into the correct jack? You don't want to plug your speakers into your microphone jack!) Are you performing a task on your PC that actually produces sound? Is the volume turned up loud enough (both on your speakers and in Windows)?
Okay, now that the easy stuff is out of the way, let's turn to something more difficult. The most likely cause of no sound is some sort of conflict. One by one, change your card's DMA, IRQ, and port settings. (This might entail resetting some jumpers on the card itself, as well as making some software-based changes.)
This problem can also occur if you add a new sound card to a system that has sound capabilities built into the motherboard. You'll need to disable the onboard sound before the new sound card can work.
Problem: Your New Sound Card Crashes Your System If you've just installed your sound card, you might not have the card properly installed. Check your installation (is the card properly seated and connected?) and then reboot your system.
If this doesn't fix it, you have something wrong in your setup. Check your software setup to make sure you have the same DMA, IRQ, and port assignments as selected on your sound card itself (usually via DIP switches or jumpers). If the settings are correct, you probably have a conflict of some kind. You should methodically change the DMA, IRQ, and port assignments in Windows so that they don't conflict with the assignments for other devices on your system. thats all friend good luck hope i helped you.

Mar 04, 2009 | Fujitsu Siemens ESPRIMO P2500 PC Desktop

Tip

Beep Code Manual


(I'm Computer Technician, I use these codes to trouble shoot hardware issues at my job. Enjoy.)

BIOS Beep Codes

When a computer is first turned on, or rebooted, it's BIOS performs a power-on self test (POST) to test the system's hardware, checking to make sure that all of the system's hardware components are working properly. Under normal circumstances, the POST will display an error message; however, if the BIOS detects an error before it can access the video card, it will produce a series of beeps, and the pattern of the beeps indicates what kind of problem the BIOS has detected. Because there are many brands of BIOS, there are no standard beep codes for every BIOS.

The two most-used brands are AMI (American Megatrends International) and Phoenix.

Below are listed the beep codes for AMI systems, and here are the beep codes for Phoenix systems.

AMI Beep Codes

Beep Code Meaning
1. beep DRAM refresh failure. There is a problem in the system memory or the motherboard.
2. beeps Memory parity error. The parity circuit is not working properly.
3. beeps Base 64K RAM failure. There is a problem with the first 64K of system memory.
4. beeps system timer not operational. There is problem with the timer(s) that control functions on the motherboard.
5. beeps Processor failure. The system CPU has failed.
6. beeps Gate A20/keyboard controller failure. The keyboard IC controller has failed, preventing gate A20 from switching the processor to protect mode.
7. beeps Virtual mode exception error.
8. beeps Video memory error. The BIOS cannot write to the frame buffer memory on the video card.
9. beeps ROM checksum error. The BIOS ROM chip on the motherboard is likely faulty.
10. beeps CMOS checksum error. Something on the motherboard is causing an error when trying to interact with the CMOS.
11. beeps Bad cache memory. An error in the level 2 cache memory.

1 long beep, 2 short Failure in the video system.
1 long beep, 3 short A failure in the video system.
1 long beep, 8 short display test failure.
Continuous beeping A problem with the memory or video.
BIOS Beep Codes

Phoenix Beep Codes

Phoenix uses sequences of beeps to indicate problems. The "-" between each number below indicates a pause between each beep sequence.
For example, 1-2-3 indicates one beep, followed by a pause and three beeps. Phoenix version before 4.x use 3-beep codes, while Phoenix versions starting with 4.x use 4-beep codes.
Click here for AMI BIOS beep codes.
4-Beep Codes

Beep Code Meaning
1-1-1-3 Faulty CPU/motherboard. Verify real mode.
1-1-2-1 Faulty CPU/motherboard.
1-1-2-3 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
1-1-3-1 Faulty motherboard or one of its components. Initialize chipset registers with initial POST values.
1-1-3-2 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
1-1-3-3 Faulty motherboard or one of its components. Initialize CPU registers.
1-1-3-2
1-1-3-3
1-1-3-4 Failure in the first 64K of memory.
1-1-4-1 Level 2 cache error.
1-1-4-3 I/O port error.
1-2-1-1 Power management error.
1-2-1-2
1-2-1-3 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
1-2-2-1 Keyboard controller failure.
1-2-2-3 BIOS ROM error.
1-2-3-1 System timer error.
1-2-3-3 DMA error.
1-2-4-1 IRQ controller error.
1-3-1-1 DRAM refresh error.
1-3-1-3 A20 gate failure.
1-3-2-1 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
1-3-3-1 Extended memory error.
1-3-3-3
1-3-4-1
1-3-4-3 Error in first 1MB of system memory.
1-4-1-3
1-4-2-4 CPU error.
1-4-3-1
2-1-4-1 BIOS ROM shadow error.
1-4-3-2
1-4-3-3 Level 2 cache error.
1-4-4-1
1-4-4-2
2-1-1-1 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
2-1-1-3
2-1-2-1 IRQ failure.
2-1-2-3 BIOS ROM error.
2-1-2-4
2-1-3-2 I/O port failure.
2-1-3-1
2-1-3-3 Video system failure.
2-1-1-3
2-1-2-1 IRQ failure.
2-1-2-3 BIOS ROM error.
2-1-2-4 I/O port failure.
2-1-4-3
2-2-1-1 Video card failure.
2-2-1-3
2-2-2-1
2-2-2-3 Keyboard controller failure.
2-2-3-1 IRQ error.
2-2-4-1 Error in first 1MB of system memory.
2-3-1-1
2-3-3-3 Extended memory failure.
2-3-2-1 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
2-3-2-3
2-3-3-1 Level 2 cache error.
2-3-4-1
2-3-4-3 Motherboard or video card failure.
2-3-4-1
2-3-4-3
2-4-1-1 Motherboard or video card failure.
2-4-1-3 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
2-4-2-1 RTC error.
2-4-2-3 Keyboard controller error.
2-4-4-1 IRQ error.
3-1-1-1
3-1-1-3
3-1-2-1
3-1-2-3 I/O port error.
3-1-3-1
3-1-3-3 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
3-1-4-1
3-2-1-1
3-2-1-2 Floppy drive or hard drive failure.
3-2-1-3 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
3-2-2-1 Keyboard controller error.
3-2-2-3
3-2-3-1
3-2-4-1 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
3-2-4-3 IRQ error.
3-3-1-1 RTC error.
3-3-1-3 Key lock error.
3-3-3-3 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
3-3-3-3
3-3-4-1
3-3-4-3
3-4-1-1
3-4-1-3
3-4-2-1
3-4-2-3
3-4-3-1
3-4-4-1
3-4-4-4 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
4-1-1-1 Floppy drive or hard drive failure.
4-2-1-1
4-2-1-3
4-2-2-1 IRQ failure.
4-2-2-3
4-2-3-1
4-2-3-3
4-2-4-1 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
4-2-4-3 Keyboard controller error.
4-3-1-3
4-3-1-4
4-3-2-1
4-3-2-2
4-3-3-1
4-3-4-1
4-3-4-3 Faulty motherboard or one of its components.
4-3-3-2
4-3-3-4 IRQ failure.
4-3-3-3
4-3-4-2 Floppy drive or hard drive failure.
3-Beep Codes
Beep Code Meaning
1-1-2 Faulty CPU/motherboard.
1-1-3 Faulty motherboard/CMOS read-write failure.
1-1-4 Faulty BIOS/BIOS ROM checksum error.
1-2-1 System timer not operational. There is a problem with the timer(s) that control functions on the motherboard.
1-2-2
1-2-3 Faulty motherboard/DMA failure.
1-3-1 Memory refresh failure.
1-3-2
1-3-3
1-3-4 Failure in the first 64K of memory.
1-4-1 Address line failure.
1-4-2 Parity RAM failure.
1-4-3 Timer failure.
1-4-4 NMI port failure.
2-_-_ Any combination of beeps after 2 indicates a failure in the first 64K of memory.
3-1-1 Master DMA failure.
3-1-2 Slave DMA failure.
3-1-3
3-1-4 Interrupt controller failure.
3-2-4 Keyboard controller failure.
3-3-1
3-3-2 CMOS error.
3-3-4 Video card failure.
3-4-1 Video card failure.
4-2-1 Timer failure.
4-2-2 CMOS shutdown failure.
4-2-3 Gate A20 failure.
4-2-4 Unexpected interrupt in protected mode.
4-3-1 RAM test failure.
4-3-3 Timer failure.
4-3-4 Time of day clock failure.
4-4-1 Serial port failure.
4-4-2 Parallel port failure.
4-4-3 Math coprocessor.

Good luck!

on Dec 31, 2009 | PC Desktops

Tip

One Reasons why PCs crash.


Fatal error: the system has become unstable or is busy, "it says. "Enter to return to windows or press Control-Alt-Delete to restart your computer. If you do this will lose any unsaved information in all open applications."
You have just been struck by the Blue Screen of Death. Anyone who uses Mcft Windows will be familiar with this. What can you do? More importantly, how can you prevent it happening?

Hardware conflict:
The number one reason why windows crashed is hardware conflict. Each hardware device communicates to other devices through an interrupt request channel (IRQ). These are supposed to be unique for each device.
For example, a printer usually connects internally on IRQ 7. The keyboard usually uses IRQ 1 and the floppy disk drive IRQ 6. Each device will try to hog a single IRQ for itself.
If there are a lot of devices, or if they are not installed properly, two of them may end up sharing the same IRQ humber. When the user tries to use both devices at the same time, a crash can happen. The way to check if your computer has a hardware conflict is through the following route.

* Start-Settings-Control Panel-System-Device Manager.

Often if a device has a problem a yellow '!' appears next to its description in the Device Manager. Highlight Computer (in the Device Manager) and press Properties to see the IRQ numbers used by your computer. If the IRQ number appears twice, two devices may be using it.

Sometimes a device might share an IRQ with something described as 'IRQ holder for PCI steering'. This can be ignored. The best way to fix this problem is to remove the problem device and reinstall it.

Sometimes you may have to find more recent drivers on the internet to make the device function properly. A good resource is www.driverguide.com. If the device is a soundcard, or a modem, it can often be fixed by moving it to a different slot on the motherboard (be careful about opening your computer, as you may void the warranty).

When working inside a computer you should switch it off, unplug the mains lead and touch an unpainted metal surface to discharge any static electricity.

To be fair to Mcft, the problem with IRQ numbers is not of its making. It is a legacy problem going back to the first PC designs using the IBM 8086 chip. Initially there were only eight IRQs. Today there are 16 IRQs in a PC. It is easy to run out of them. There are plans to increase the number of IRQs in future designs.
Good luck!

on Dec 14, 2009 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Have just installed VLC media player and although it plays DVDs, I find the sound quality to be very poor - sound is jerky, stop/start, stacatto, and clearly not at all like the actual audio track of the...


This sounds like a memory related issue, could be that there is not enough memory for the audio card, or the information isn't being handled properly by the audio card. If your really gem on the program you could try uninstalling your audio card drivers and reinstalling them, and same way with the media player software. Try pulling the media software first, then pull the audio, then install the media without the audio, then install the audio if windows allows you to do that. Somewhere you have a conflict. You could also attempt to rotate your dma/irq settings, that could also do the trick. Most audio uses irq5 try 10 or some other one that's free?

Nov 14, 2008 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

Want to know applications of DMA in real time


Good Morning
IT it a little "brige" to some sound aplications or routing signal to Printers or Sound Cards, but not for Network. Not good sometimes for Sound Cards, but you can play sometimes with settings and see what happend, you always can go back the DMA at previuos state, or simple, disable.
Carl

Nov 17, 2007 | Linare Desktop, AMD Sempron 2200,40 GB HDD...

1 Answer

Audio and video track are not in sync


I guess that your CDROM Device doesn't have DMA (Direct Memory Access) enabled.

From the Microsoft Knowledge Base Article:

To enable DMA mode using the Device Manager

1.

Open Device Manager.

2.

Double-click IDE ATA/ATAPI Controllers to display the list of controllers and channels.

3.

Right-click the icon for the channel to which the device is connected, select Properties, and then click the Advanced Settings tab.

4.

In the Current Transfer Mode drop-down box, select DMA if Available if the current setting is "PIO Only."
If the drop-down box already shows "DMA if Available" but the current transfer mode is PIO, then the user must toggle the settings. That is:

Change the selection from "DMA if available" to PIO only, and click OK.

Then repeat the steps above to change the selection to DMA if Available.

Oct 14, 2007 | PC Desktops

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