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Screeching noise when high velocity pedestal fan is turned on

When I turn on the fan, it makes a screeching high pitch noise. The manual states that the motor bearings are permanently sealed and do not require additional lubrication.

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  • Anonymous Nov 29, 2008

    I have the same problem asd lbwilliams12, except that it sceeches on any speed (louder on high, spfter on low). Sounds like something needs to be oiled.

  • Anonymous Jan 31, 2009

    I have the same screeching noise coming from my Kaz HT-800. The noise continues on all speeds. If the bearings are sealed where could I try lubricating it? Is it even worth taking apart?

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6 Suggested Answers

Benimur
  • 6966 Answers

SOURCE: My ceiling fan - Casa Viejo

Sorry for the delay in response. Electrically, there should be no potential hazard since there would be no more "juice" running through the circuitry.

Posted on Nov 14, 2008

  • 5 Answers

SOURCE: The Attic fan on my house roof is making a loud

My estimation is that the bearings in the fan are in need of lubrication. What I suspect is happening is the fan is offering too much resistance to the motor, causing the fan belt to slip on the pulley and make the screeching sound.

Have a look at the inside surfaces on the belt and see if they are dull or shiny. A new belt will have dull, non-reflective surface. An older belt will have inner surfaces that look like glass and can't get a good grip on the pulley.

I suggest first loosening the motor (power disconnected first, of course) mounting and check by hand the ease of rotation of the fan shaft. If it's stiff or resistant to your turning it by hand, put a drop or two of light machine oil (like the sort used on sewing machines) in the space between the shaft and its bearing. Work it in a bit and see if that helps it turn more freely. The difference could be dramatic! You might need to add a drop or two more to help it along if it's really dry.

If that doesn't get rid of the screeching, then you may have to replace the V-belt, especially if it's glazed and shiny on the inside as I describe above. These belts are sized by the outside width of the belt and the overall length. These belts are sold by the same stores that sell the attic fans themselves, but I wouldn't totally rule out a well-stocked non-chain hardware store having them also.

In summary, 1) check lubrication of fan shaft, 2) check the condition of the inside surfaces of the V-belt and replace if needed.

Posted on Jun 11, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Loud noises from Lasko fan motor?

The problem most likely lies within the fan motor of your Lasko unit. I just got fed up with my Lasko tower fan (model 2515) making a rumbling noise on and off and so I took apart the entire thing. I found the noise to be coming from the Decomin 2033014 motor in the unit. Took apart the motor and found that it is so cheap that it doesn't even have bearings! Just a few plastic discs on a spindle. I tried greasing the discs again but it didn't work. The only solution is to get a new motor. I am really disappointed in the quality of these Lasko fans.

Posted on Jul 09, 2009

  • 497 Answers

SOURCE: Fan does not work!

These tower fans tend to die out fast. It does sound like the stator in the motor got a short since the vain still freely moves. It boils down to your emotional attachment to the fan. You can order a new motor off the internet and spend some cash. If the fan doesnt mean much Walmart has tower fans for dirt cheap ESPECIALLY around school starting.

Posted on Aug 09, 2009

  • 7115 Answers

SOURCE: Aloha Breeze pedestal fan blades won't turn, but motor is humming

remove protected cover and with wd-40 or oil spray lightly behind the blade at the base oil up the bearing turn blade by hand till free put back and test the bearings get sticky from the dust

Posted on Sep 12, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Utilitech high velocity 20" pedestal fan, no

I would like to find an on/off/speed switch for my utilitech fan. Where can I find parts for my fan?

Posted on Aug 21, 2011

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The type noise is crucial in knowing the problem. Is it an electrical humming sound. To find out, place it at high speed, then turn off the power. did it go away or is it still there. If it isn't the electrical, it may be the bearings. The older types have an oil reservoir that needs lubricating. the newer ones are sealed bearings. try a little WD40. make sure you keep this lubricant away from the electrical components, because it has a reaction to certain plastics

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The Attic fan on my house roof is making a loud screeching noise. What is wrong with it and what do I need to do to fix it?


My estimation is that the bearings in the fan are in need of lubrication. What I suspect is happening is the fan is offering too much resistance to the motor, causing the fan belt to slip on the pulley and make the screeching sound.

Have a look at the inside surfaces on the belt and see if they are dull or shiny. A new belt will have dull, non-reflective surface. An older belt will have inner surfaces that look like glass and can't get a good grip on the pulley.

I suggest first loosening the motor (power disconnected first, of course) mounting and check by hand the ease of rotation of the fan shaft. If it's stiff or resistant to your turning it by hand, put a drop or two of light machine oil (like the sort used on sewing machines) in the space between the shaft and its bearing. Work it in a bit and see if that helps it turn more freely. The difference could be dramatic! You might need to add a drop or two more to help it along if it's really dry.

If that doesn't get rid of the screeching, then you may have to replace the V-belt, especially if it's glazed and shiny on the inside as I describe above. These belts are sized by the outside width of the belt and the overall length. These belts are sold by the same stores that sell the attic fans themselves, but I wouldn't totally rule out a well-stocked non-chain hardware store having them also.

In summary, 1) check lubrication of fan shaft, 2) check the condition of the inside surfaces of the V-belt and replace if needed.

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Hampton bay fan makes squeeking noise


If the fan is fairly new, remove it and return it to Home Depot. It is almost certainly something that has fallen down into the motor and is rubbing loudly enough to make a squeak as the fan runs faster.

The fan itself has sealed lubrication and you don't have to lubricate it.

Apr 07, 2009 | Hampton Bay 24750 Huntington III Ceiling...

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Sorry for the delay in response. Electrically, there should be no potential hazard since there would be no more "juice" running through the circuitry.

Nov 14, 2008 | Fans

1 Answer

My ceiling fan - Casa Viejo


Sorry for the delay in response. Electrically, there should be no potential hazard since there would be no more "juice" running through the circuitry.

Nov 14, 2008 | Fans

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Aloha breeze industrial floor fan


I assume this is the very popular 18-inch High Velocity sold at Wal-Mart. If you cannot return it to your local store contact Aloha Housewares at: 1-800-295-4448. Good Luck!

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The fan does not need to be oiled. The bearings are what manufacturers described as "permanently-sealed", which means that they're designed such that they don't require oiling. The manufacturers recommend against oiling, and if you really wanted to do it, you'd have to be an expert, because there is some very complex disassembly to be done, which requires specialized tools.

HOWEVER...

The problem is not related to oil. A lack of oil does not produce a hum. If a fan's bearings are low on oil, the sound generated is a scraping or brushing sound. A hum, on the other hand, is an electrical sound. All fan motors hum to some degree -- the cheap made-in-China ones, like in your Hampton Bay fan, hum more than others. There are some steps you can take to reduce the hum:

* If you are using the fan with a solid-state control (i.e. a dimmer), that will cause the fan to hum. These controls are dangerous when used with fans, and a fire can result. You should have a qualified person remove the switch immediately and replace it with either a regular on/off switch OR a discrete-speed (i.e. 3-speed or 4-speed, rather than variable-dimmer) switch. Specially-designed ceiling fan switches such as this are available at your local Home Depot or Lowes. You could also use a remote-control system.

* If you have a remote control or other speed control system, make sure that the pull-chain speed control on the fan is set to the "high" position (highest speed possible) and left there.

* Make sure that all the screws are tight -- this includes screws which hold up the fan's mounting bracket, hold the blades onto the fan, and hold any applicable glass onto the light kit.

* Even if you don't have a speed control, the motor will still produce an electrical hum -- and the blades, which are physically attached to the motor, serve as mechanical amplifiers -- they take the tiny electrical hum and amplify it just like the big brass funnel speaker on an antique gramophone (record player) takes the tiny vibrations of the needle on the record and amplifies them to a comfortably audible level. High-end fans have a rubber flywheel attached to the motor between the blade holders and the motor unit -- and since rubber doesn't transmit vibrations well, this effectively deadens the sound. Your fan doesn't have one of these, but you can effectively replicate the noise-dampening effect by putting rubber washers between where the blade holders touch the bottom of the motor AND between where the screws which hold the blade holders onto the motor, meet the blade holders themselves. This will completely remove the path along which the sound vibrations can flow to the blades, and thus your hum will stop.

I hope this helps you! If you have any other questions, or need clarification, please ask!

Jun 14, 2008 | Hampton Bay 24002 Ceiling Fan

1 Answer

Celing fan making noise, how to oil


The fan does not need to be oiled. The bearings are what manufacturers described as "permanently-sealed", which means that they're designed such that they don't require oiling. The manufacturers recommend against oiling, and if you really wanted to do it, you'd have to be an expert, because there is some very complex disassembly to be done, which requires specialized tools.

HOWEVER...

The problem is not related to oil. A lack of oil does not produce a hum. If a fan's bearings are low on oil, the sound generated is a scraping or brushing sound. A hum, on the other hand, is an electrical sound. All fan motors hum to some degree -- the cheap made-in-China ones, like in your Hampton Bay fan, hum more than others. There are some steps you can take to reduce the hum:

* If you are using the fan with a solid-state control (i.e. a dimmer), that will cause the fan to hum. These controls are dangerous when used with fans, and a fire can result. You should have a qualified person remove the switch immediately and replace it with either a regular on/off switch OR a discrete-speed (i.e. 3-speed or 4-speed, rather than variable-dimmer) switch. Specially-designed ceiling fan switches such as this are available at your local Home Depot or Lowes. You could also use a remote-control system.

* If you have a remote control or other speed control system, make sure that the pull-chain speed control on the fan is set to the "high" position (highest speed possible) and left there.

* Make sure that all the screws are tight -- this includes screws which hold up the fan's mounting bracket, hold the blades onto the fan, and hold any applicable glass onto the light kit.

* Even if you don't have a speed control, the motor will still produce an electrical hum -- and the blades, which are physically attached to the motor, serve as mechanical amplifiers -- they take the tiny electrical hum and amplify it just like the big brass funnel speaker on an antique gramophone (record player) takes the tiny vibrations of the needle on the record and amplifies them to a comfortably audible level. High-end fans have a rubber flywheel attached to the motor between the blade holders and the motor unit -- and since rubber doesn't transmit vibrations well, this effectively deadens the sound. Your fan doesn't have one of these, but you can effectively replicate the noise-dampening effect by putting rubber washers between where the blade holders touch the bottom of the motor AND between where the screws which hold the blade holders onto the motor, meet the blade holders themselves. This will completely remove the path along which the sound vibrations can flow to the blades, and thus your hum will stop.

I hope this helps you! If you have any other questions, or need clarification, please ask!

Apr 30, 2008 | Hampton Bay 24002 Ceiling Fan

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