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Cannot play sound on my computer

When i try to play or record a sound on my computer a message pops up and says 'another application is recording audio stop recording with this other application and then try to record with this sound recorder again.'

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Take a look at your quick launch tool bar (the little arrow nex to the clock.) run your pointer over each one of them and see if any of the audio device is running. if so, right click on theicon and exit or close.



please rate the answer if that solved your problem
thank you

Posted on Oct 16, 2008

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I have ASUS Xonar DS installed on my PC (2.8GHz Pentium, 2Gb RAM, 160Gb HDD). When I try to record using Audacity or some other recording program I find that the recording seems to "miss" some...


I would check to make sure that you dont have anything else running while encoding the audio. Since audio encoding is processor intensive it very easily could be an application or AntiVirus software interfering with the ability to record audio.

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How to computer capture a sound card


<p>Record and recording the sounds through the computer sound is a relatively simple procedure that only a free space on the hard disk, suitable software and a short profile of TRS cable is required. Windows computers usually come with an audio recording program, from the entertainment equipment a program is found in the Start menu. <br /> <p><br /> <p>1. Turning off the computer speaker's audio jack of your computer's sound card. <br /> <p><br /> <p>2. Attach the small RCA cable into the sound card speaker output. <br /> <p><br /> <p>3. Connect the other end of the RCA small correction to the microphone port on your sound card. <br /> <p><br /> <p>4. Start the Sound Recorder program from the Start menu. Click the Record button. Tell your computer to the sound you want music or video progress bar to take to indicate when the movie is ready to play. Click the Record button, which will continue to record. <br /> <p><br /> <p>5. Click the File menu in the Sound Recorder program and select "Save As". Enter a filename and click Save. <br />

on Jun 22, 2011 | Audio Cards

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I ahve a question regarding my sound card everytime i try ko record a sound there always pop up a message saying theres not enough memory availbale to complete this operation etc.. I have 3gb of RAM what...


could be where your saving it is too small. It has to alot so much space before you start recording. I use pro tools and I have to have a external hard drive to record on.

Feb 18, 2011 | Audio Cards

1 Answer

"unable to open audio recording device. Device may not support..


sorry its a software every time when you recieved a fetal error its came from software's corrupted dll file

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Audio Recording Problems


try using the windows sound recorder to see if that records music? if it doesnt then you need to go into your sound recording properties and change it from mic to wave

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No sound coming through when recording from hi fi tape to computer


This is actually simple to do. Connect the line out on your tape player to the line in on your computer. Then download a free program, from the net called Audacity at http://audacity.sourceforge.net/. The program is totally free and works great. Some recording studios use this program. In the middle of the main Window on Audacity set it to record from Line in. This is from the small drop down menu next to the little microphone icon. Then hit the record button on Audacity and play your tape. You can record each song individually or you can record the whole side of the tape at once and separate the tracks when you save them. You can even use this program to clean up the sound on your recordings. I have transferred many of my tapes and records to CD using this process. I hope I have been helpful and good luck

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1 Answer

Stuttering sound when recording


It's crucial that you understand the concept of latency.

Latency it the time delay between the trigger and the operation.
In terms of computer sound recording and generation:
1) The time between the midi trigger and the sound generated by a software synth to come out of the speakers.
2) The time between the analog audio signal input to be converted to digital and stored on the hard drive.
3) The time between the digital audio track to be retrieved from the hard drive and converted to an analog signal that comes out the speakers or headphones.
4) All of the above at the same time.

The factors that contribute to this latency form a pipeline that include the A/D (analog to digital) device (UA-25), the software drivers for that device, the operating system, the recording application being used, the operating system again, your internal computer speed and your hard drive speed. Remember that the sound needs to go both in and out, often simultaneously (thats called full duplex).

A latency of up to 50ms is probably tolerable, but for optimum recording, it should be closer to 5ms. If you were to go over 50ms, you would need some sort of time compensation, whether automatic or manual, because nothing would synchronize properly, be it the metronome or previously recorded tracks.

"What's this mean, and how does it relate to my situation?" you ask.

Lemme tell you. The recording program and drivers will incorporate software buffers to adjust for slower components in your sound recording pipeline. Without buffers, or with too few buffers, the pipeline can drop information (sound) if it is not be able to process it quickly enough. This will often result in stuttering and skips. Sound familiar?

So why not just put LOADs and LOADs of buffers in the pipeline? You most certainly can, but for every buffer you add, you gain a bit of latency. And remember that too much latency is a bad thing.

"Ouch! I still don't get it. What am I supposed to do?" you ask.

I reply, "Good question, Grasshopper." You want to stop your stuttering. You need to increase the efficiency of your sound pipeline. For regular people this means the following, in order:
  1. Make sure you purchase an A/D-D/A device that has low-latency drivers utilizing one or more of the following standards: ASIO, WDM, MME or CoreAudio. Selecting the one that your RECORDING APPLICATION utilizes. ASIO is widely supported and good. WDM is the worst because it is really just regular Windows drivers, but they can sometimes be optimized for low latency.
  2. Make sure you install your drivers properly, selecting the one that your RECORDING PROGRAM uses.
  3. Make sure that your recording application has the hardware selected for your A/D-D/A device and the drivers that you previously installed.
  4. Make sure that your recording application is using ONLY the hardware specifically designed for low latency, which is your A/D device that you previously purchased and installed.
  5. Make sure you include as many buffers as you can while maintaining a low latency. Often, this is dependent on your recording application.
  6. Set the UA-25 to 44.1KHz or 48KHz, not 96KHz. 96Khz does not allow for full duplex.
Do these things and attempt to record something. If it stutters right away or you get "underruns" you need to increase your buffers. If everything is peachy for a while, but soon you start getting skips, try increasing the buffers, or get a faster hard drive or turn off some digital effects.

In summation: A Celeron 1.6GHz should have sufficient power to record, play and add a few VST plug-ins, maybe even a dozen or more. Chances are that your hard drive is fast enough to retrieve and record 16-32 tracks at a time. Turn off all the stupid, little programs that make icons near your clock, like the DELL support and Weatherbug and AIM and AOL and HP Monitor and anything that takes processing power and hogs memory.

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1 Answer

Recordings play but skip every other second


you either don't have enough space on your computer for it to find the file and replay it(computers don't record in one solid track ,they take pieces and store them where ever they can.This is why its not good to defrag your comp. once you start a project) or you need to increase your buffer

Mar 19, 2008 | Tascam US-122 Sound Card

1 Answer

Problem with playback


Hi, I have the same audio interface. Alright, make sure that all of your effects are turned off. you probably (and most likely) have the "fx voice", "amp drive", "chorus" and "delay" effects turned on (bottom row). There is no way you should have distortion with tremolo & reverb on playback all the same time without the effects being turned on. the pop ticking could be produced by the buffer size. If youre using Sonar LE, you should tweek the buffer size until playback sounds smooth. I hope I helped! Good luck!

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