Question about Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Furnace ices up,lines ice up,water condensation leaking in to duct work

Split system, heat pump outside and furnace inside. Furnace ice over and lines beside ice over. Will not cool or takes a long time to cool. Water leaking in to flexible duct.

Posted by on

  • Anonymous Mar 23, 2014

    teco split system

×

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Corporal:

    An expert that hasĀ over 10 points.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 14 Answers

1.check filter if really dirty change
2. check Refrigerant if low get charged by a tech
3. check the evaporator coil if dirty clean

Posted on Oct 16, 2008

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Furnace has water under it, why? Its a Dayton gas furnace.


There are several questions that need to be answered about what type of system you have, but i found this posting that may help:
As your gas furnace runs, is there water leaking at the base? Is the furnace's air filter wet, too?There are a few things that could be happening here. But if you have a high-efficiency furnace, here's the most common cause: a condensation leak.
We'll explain why a furnace creates condensation, and what's causing it to leak out of your furnace.
Note: You'll know if you have a high-efficiency furnace if:
  • The yellow energy guide tag says your furnace's efficiency is 90% or higher AFUE.
  • The vent/flue pipe is white PVC as opposed to metal.
Why a high-efficiency furnace creates condensation
How in the heck does a high efficiency furnace create condensation/water anyway?
It's all about how the furnace extracts heat from combustion gases.
A lower-efficiency furnace extracts some heat from combustion gases and then quickly vents them out the flue pipe.
But a high-efficiency furnace, to extract more heat, has 2 heat exchangers. These allow the furnace to extract heat from the gases for a longer period of time. This causes the combustion gases to cool and then condense.
That condensation then exits out your home through a drain. But if that water is pooling around the furnace, there's a problem preventing it from draining properly.
Causes of a condensation leak around a high-efficiency furnace
  • Clogged condensation tubing
  • Clogged condensation drain
  • Breaks in the condensation line
  • Issues with the condensate pump (if you have one)
You'll need a furnace technician to diagnose which of these is the issue and then fix it.
Other causes of leaking water around a furnace
If you have a conventional, standard-efficiency furnace...then its flue pipe may be incorrectly sized.
If you have a whole-house humidifier connected to the furnace...there may be an issue which is causing the humidifier to leak into your furnace. Your humidifier should be getting annual maintenance from a professional to prevent this.

Dec 13, 2016 | Dayton Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

Brand New 2 weeks old 4 ton Trane compressor leaks a lot of water onto pad


If the unit is running in cold weather than there is ice building up on the coils located outside. This is normal in that the unit is running in heat pump mode heating inside and cooling outside, After the unit detects the ice build up it briefly reverses the cycle heating the outside coils melting(defrosting) the ice which you observe as water on the pad.

The video gives you an example of the defrost cycle!
2012 Trane XL15i Heat Pump Defrost Cycle Steam Show

Dec 21, 2015 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

During the heat wave, I noticed my furnace was leaking water on the bottom. I thought it could have just been condensation. Now I see it's dripping some water in the middle of my furnace in the back.


YOur drain is plugged or your pan above the furnace is rusted thru or cracked. Is the system cooling well or poor. If poor, the coil could be icing and the blower is throwing water around. Clean the filter too.

Jul 22, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

There is water leaking out from the bottom of my furnace. It leaks whenever the ac is running.


Hello, sounds like a clogged condensate line or a faulty condensate pump if the unit has one. Cleaning the drain line should fix the problem.

Jul 12, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

I went downstairs to start a load of clothes and noticed water under my furnace. My A/C is running and I had it cleaned a few weeks ago and the unit itself had to be charged. It has run beautifully and...


Hello, most likey if the unit is cooling and there is no visible ice on the suction line then it is probably a cloged condensate line that will need to be cleaned.

Jul 11, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

There is no cool air coming through my vents from my Lennox Hp13 heat pump. Only room temperature air seems to come through.What might be wrong?


Due to the many different questions I see about Air Conditioning, I am including this overview to help us better understand each other for trouble shooting. A basic air conditioning system has a Thermostat, Air Handler or Furnace Fan and a Condensing unit. In a split system, the condensing unit (Condenser) is separate from the furnace and usually in the back yard. When working properly, it blows hot air. It connects to the cooling part of the system by 2 copper lines. One large line and 1 small line. The part that cools the house is the "Evaporator" and is usually on top of the furnace inside the square metal box (Plenum). When the Air Conditioner is running, the large copper line should be cold and the smaller line should be warm. Common signs of low refrigerant are that both lines are the same temperature and/or frost or ice has built up on the large line at the condenser. The thermostat will normally display room temperature on till it is touched to change the setting. It could have a "Span" setting as well as times and temperatures. The operating "span" of MOST residential thermostats is 40 to 90 degrees. That means you can set it as low as 40 degrees and no higher than 90 degrees. It probably has a fan switch also. When in the "ON" position, the fan will run constantly, 24 / 7, but the condenser will still cycle on and off as needed to keep the house at set point. If you have a suggestion to include in this paragraph, please let me know.

Take a look at everything above. Let me know what type of help you need. Roger

Apr 10, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

My daughter has a Bryant AC Model number 563AN048-A where the outside coils are freezing up. The repairman has been out twice and has cleaned the coils on the inside and outside units and has checked the...


Hi, this is a 4 ton unit, Bryant are top of the line, I believe so as I have worked on them for so many years. They were Day & night, just a name change is all. Here is what sounds like your problem is, or is your problem. Did the tech check the TD of the supply air and return air? This is the temperature difference. There should be a TD of 18*f to 25* TD or temperature split. Example is, if the supply is 56*, the return at the filter should be at around 76* which is a 20* TD. If the outdoor condenser started to defrost when you removed the filter, you were getting more return air through the evaporator coil. This tells me that your return air duct has either come loose, has a large hole or holes in it, or if you had a repairman under the house or in the attic where ever the duct work is, has flattened it, and you are not getting enough return air back through the evaporator coil. This will cause the condenser coil to ice up quite fast. When you remove the filter and panel, you should feel a pulling almost like a magnet as the return air will be a strong force. This is your problem if all coils are clean and the system is charged properly, this is the only way the outdoor coil will ice in the summer. If the indoor coil were dirty, or low on freon, the indoor unit would be the coil with the ice build up. You say the air increased slightly, and the outdoor coil started to defrost. The problem is the return air 18" duct is either crushed, Holes from pests, or has come lose at some point. This is all it could be, mark my word!! Have it checked, or if you are able to check it, you can maybe hear it where ever it was put in, up, or down under. Find it, and you will increase the CFM by 50% depending on the leak. Please keep me posted on this and when you rate me be kind as I know you will. Trust me, this is your problem. Please keep me updated by my user name below.
Sincerely,
Shastalaker7
A/C, Heating, & Refrigeration Contractor

Aug 01, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

My condensor in the furnace ices up which restricts the airflow. Is this normal. When I shut off the air conditioner the ice melts and causes a minor flood in the furnace. thanks


The indoor coil or "Evaporator Coil" (condenser is the outside coil in air conditioning) should never freeze when an air conditioning system is installed, maintained and serviced properly.
The most common cause of evaporator freezing is a clogged or dirty air filter. Other causes include; a clogged or dirty coil; blower malfunction, filter too restrictive (in which case use a less restrictive type), undersized duct, closed and or covered registers and grills, and collapsed duct.
Another common cause of evaporator icing is loss of refrigerant in which case you should call a professional who can locate and repair the refrigerant leak and recharge your system.

Jun 25, 2010 | Carrier 38CKC036 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Relay not engaging


This solution is based on a non-heat pump split system (furnace inside and condensing unit outside). The relay takes 24vac to energize and pull in closing the high voltage circuit to the compressor and condenser fan. If 24vac is present at the coil (two side terminals with smaller wire) and the relay does not pull in you need a new one. If no 24v is present then the outside unit is not getting the signal from the furnace and thermostat. If you pop off the furnace covers and access the control board your wires that go outside land on terminals C and Y. Y should have two wires, one from the thermostat and and the second goes to the outside unit. Test for 24v between C and Y. You must bypass the safety switch on the door prior to testing because that switch will cut off the power to the furnace. If nothing then you have a thermostat problem. If voltage is present you have a wiring issue between the furnace and outside unit.

Jul 11, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Honeywell furnace humidifier thermostat & other


sounds like to me you have a condensation pump attached to your hvac system. this can be used to pump water produced during the cooling of your house when in the a/c mode. if you have a typical bypass humidifier, you will have excess water running past the water panel and it must be sent to a drain of some kind. I would imagine the pump is being used to get your bypass water to the drain. another scenario may be that you have a 90% condensing furnace. if your exhaust pipe for the furnace is made out of pcv pipe, it is a condensing gas furnace. it will produce water when it is running. the water if from the combustion gases being condensed in the secondary heat exchanger. this is normal. some condensing gas furnaces will draw combustion air from inside the house and some will have a second pvc pipe that is used to pulll combustion air from the outside of the house. either way, it is not dehumidifying your house. the humidifier should be able to keep up if it is runnng properly. you should have water running out the bottom drain of the humidifier any time the fan on your furnace is running and the humidistat is calling for humidity. if this is not happening, it is not wired properly.

Jan 16, 2009 | Honeywell Power Humidifier: Furnace...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Heating & Cooling Logo

Related Topics:

341 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Heating & Cooling Experts

paulcarew

Level 3 Expert

2365 Answers

Dan Webster
Dan Webster

Level 3 Expert

8205 Answers

Donni Steen

Level 3 Expert

659 Answers

Are you a Heating and Cooling Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...