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Hello, I get a mild electric shock from the strings on my bass guitar after i have turned my amp on. Nothing seems to be wrong with the bass itself and i have checked the plug for loose wires or split insulation & there's nothing wrong there. I have also done a rudiimentary check of the wiring inside the amp and as far as i can see there is nothing wrong there. I did change the extension lead that i was using for a new one & i have also changed the guitar leads to new ones as well but the problem persists. can anyone advise me further please?

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Robetek is spot on.
I worked in the live music biz for 27 years, as lead soundtech. I ALWAYS checked the instruments for possible voltage backfeeds, onstage, before the soundchecks. I have noticed more often than I can count that poor grounds, or earth, as Robo has stated, CAN AND WILL shock you. Or worse.
I have personally measured 70 volts DC between guitar strings and the microphone (in this case, a Shure SM-58; with a metal windscreen)...AND got shocked doing it...70 volts DC is enough to stop one's heart. Most always attributle to bad grounds, no grounds, or "reversing" the grounds to kill the "hum" found due to various electrical incompatibilty....
2 actual cases in point: The bassist for Uriah Heep, Gary Thain, and the lead guitarist for Stone the Crows, Les Harvey (he also played lead guitar on "All RIght Now", by Free)..., were BOTH electrocuted onstage, at a live gig. No way to die, my man, no way to die. and AVOIDABLE.
We experts hear at FIxYa are concerned about the health & well being of all of the "askers", like you, and we do NOT give out **** info.
PLEASE H\heed Robo's words wisely. Get your stuff all checked out. Everything. Guitar, amp, all of the cords, and anything else that you may come in contact with, anywhere.
The life you save may be yours. Not busting on you, my friend, just trying to help.

Posted on Oct 27, 2008

  • Toyota Ed Oct 29, 2008

    Thnaks for the FIxYa! Much appreciated. Could you please front Robotek a FixYa also? And,if you need ANY more help on your shock issue, PLEASE feel free to call on me, anytime Best regards, and THANK YOU for choosing FixYa.

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Hi FR101621

This is not good, you should not get electric shocks of any part of your gear. I strongly suggest that you take it to a qualified electronics guy that can perform an electrical safety check on it for you. It may be that the earth potential of your mains is different to the earth potential of the floor you are standing on. This may cause a small shock(would depend what country you are in and the mains system supply you are using). In any case, I would (for your safety) get it checked and tagged as safe. This is the only way to be sure you wont eventually GET KILLED!! Does not cost alot, usually about $30. Then you know it is good

regards
robotek

Posted on Oct 13, 2008

  • Graeme Ross
    Graeme Ross Oct 27, 2008

    I should clarify here that there is probably an leakage to earth issue with the amp. The basses strings should be at earth potential, so you should NEVER get a shock from them unless there is an earthing issue with the amp, the supply in your house, or the front end of the amp, or internal to the guitar. We have to set aside static discharge from this because you tell us the problem is only there when you have the amp turned on. If you do not have a hum issue when using it, then there is certainly a safety issue here. PLEASE GET IT CHECKED OUT. Let me know how you got on.



    regards

    robotek

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