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I have several virus's detected including worms and trogen 22 files infected. i have Norton 360 version 2.0

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You have two options:

  1. Using norton and several internet based virus scanners try to remove the virus's. This could be quite difficult as some virus's don't give up easily. This option allows you to keep all your programs installed and data but a full recovery isn't 100% likely.
  2. You can reinstall windows using either a factory reset cd or a windows cd with owned cd key. You will need to have all the drivers for your computer if you use the windows cd versus the factory reset cd. Make sure to backup important data. You will have to reinstall programs. This option allows you to have a fresh install of windows which should run well and have no trace of the virus's.
Depending on what you want to try more detailed directions can be given. If so more information on the computer would be important such as make and model.

Posted on Oct 11, 2008

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  • PC Desktops Master
  • 4,338 Answers

Your Norton's anti-virus database if probably out dated. You need to update it and then start your computer in Safe Mode and run the anti-virus scan.
To get into Safe Mode:
Shutdown your computer. Then restart and hit F8 as soon as the video shows. then when you get the menu, select Safe Mode from the menu.
If you cannot get Norton's to update, download the free version of AVG Anti-virus and run it in Safe Mode.
If I could be of further assistance, let me know. If this helps or solves the issue, please rate it.
Thanks, Joe

Posted on Oct 11, 2008

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Why when I had a open window and it started flickering it had never done that before and it hasn't again? why did it do that?


You should purchase a security program like Norton 360 or Kaspersky. These have come down a lot in price and it is much cheaper to buy one of these strong high feature security programs than have some paid professional try and remove masses of malware and virus on your machine.

If you are really poor then you can load these free programs
1. Microsoft Security Essentials (google it and it comes up for download but ONLY download this from the Microsoft site and never from any 3rd party site.) This is a very good product.

2. AVG anti virus free edition.
http://www.avg.com/au-en/free-antivirus-download
This is limited in scope. If you want the full deal you need buy the program with all the features.

3. There are many bogus suppliers out there offering free security type software or malware removal; and virus removal programs for your machine. Never down load any of these as they will cause more problems and you will have problems uninstalling them. AVG is safe though.

Hope this helps.

Nov 12, 2015 | HP PC Desktops

4 Answers

Virus MS AntiSpyware 2009


HI,

Your PC has been effected with spyware.You can try using a spyware software like webroot 2008 to remove this.

This is the only solution to fix this thing.

Dec 30, 2008 | PC Desktops

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Different types of Virus and their effect's.


Different Types of Computer Viruses There are Different Types of Computer Viruses could be classified in (origin, techniques, types of files they infect, where they hide, the kind of damage they cause, the type of operating system or platform they attack) etc. Let us have a look at them…

Computer Virus is a kind of malicious software written intentionally to enter a computer without the user’s permission or knowledge, with an ability to replicate itself, thus continuing to spread. Some viruses do little but replicate others can cause severe harm or adversely effect program and performance of the system. A virus should never be assumed harmless and left on a system. Most common types of viruses are mentioned below:

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Resident Viruses
This type of virus is a permanent which dwells in the RAM memory. From there it can overcome and interrupt all of the operations executed by the system: corrupting files and programs that are opened, closed, copied, renamed etc.

Examples include: Randex, CMJ, Meve, and MrKlunky.

Direct Action Viruses
The main purpose of this virus is to replicate and take action when it is executed. When a specific condition is met, the virus will go into action and infect files in the directory or folder that it is in and in directories that are specified in the AUTOEXEC.BAT file PATH. This batch file is always located in the root directory of the hard disk and carries out certain operations when the computer is booted.

Overwrite Viruses
Virus of this kind is characterized by the fact that it deletes the information contained in the files that it infects, rendering them partially or totally useless once they have been infected.

The only way to clean a file infected by an overwrite virus is to delete the file completely, thus losing the original content.

Examples of this virus include: Way, Trj.Reboot, Trivial.88.D.

Boot Virus
This type of virus affects the boot sector of a floppy or hard disk. This is a crucial part of a disk, in which information on the disk itself is stored together with a program that makes it possible to boot (start) the computer from the disk.

The best way of avoiding boot viruses is to ensure that floppy disks are write-protected and never start your computer with an unknown floppy disk in the disk drive.

Examples of boot viruses include: Polyboot.B, AntiEXE.

Macro Virus
Macro viruses infect files that are created using certain applications or programs that contain macros. These mini-programs make it possible to automate series of operations so that they are performed as a single action, thereby saving the user from having to carry them out one by one.

Examples of macro viruses: Relax, Melissa.A, Bablas, O97M/Y2K.

Directory Virus
Directory viruses change the paths that indicate the location of a file. By executing a program (file with the extension .EXE or .COM) which has been infected by a virus, you are unknowingly running the virus program, while the original file and program have been previously moved by the virus.

Once infected it becomes impossible to locate the original files.

Polymorphic Virus
Polymorphic viruses encrypt or encode themselves in a different way (using different algorithms and encryption keys) every time they infect a system.

This makes it impossible for anti-viruses to find them using string or signature searches (because they are different in each encryption) and also enables them to create a large number of copies of themselves.

Examples include: Elkern, Marburg, Satan Bug, and Tuareg.

File Infectors
This type of virus infects programs or executable files (files with an .EXE or .COM extension). When one of these programs is run, directly or indirectly, the virus is activated, producing the damaging effects it is programmed to carry out. The majority of existing viruses belong to this category, and can be classified depending on the actions that they carry out.

Companion Viruses
Companion viruses can be considered file infector viruses like resident or direct action types. They are known as companion viruses because once they get into the system they "accompany" the other files that already exist. In other words, in order to carry out their infection routines, companion viruses can wait in memory until a program is run (resident viruses) or act immediately by making copies of themselves (direct action viruses).

Some examples include: Stator, Asimov.1539, and Terrax.1069

FAT Virus
The file allocation table or FAT is the part of a disk used to connect information and is a vital part of the normal functioning of the computer.
This type of virus attack can be especially dangerous, by preventing access to certain sections of the disk where important files are stored. Damage caused can result in information losses from individual files or even entire directories.

Worms
A worm is a program very similar to a virus; it has the ability to self-replicate, and can lead to negative effects on your system and most importantly they are detected and eliminated by antiviruses.

Examples of worms include: PSWBugbear.B, Lovgate.F, Trile.C, Sobig.D, Mapson.

Trojans or Trojan Horses
Another unsavory breed of malicious code are Trojans or Trojan horses, which unlike viruses do not reproduce by infecting other files, nor do they self-replicate like worms.

Logic Bombs
They are not considered viruses because they do not replicate. They are not even programs in their own right but rather camouflaged segments of other programs.

Their objective is to destroy data on the computer once certain conditions have been met. Logic bombs go undetected until launched, and the results can be destructive.


on Jul 09, 2010 | PC Desktops

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Malware Part 1: Viruses, Trojans, Worms, Spyware, Adware


Malwares or Malicious softwares are programs that are made intending to sabotage and destroy your computer or penetrate, spy and steal your information on your computer. These Malicious Software could be categorized into 5 major groups Viruses, Trojans, Worms, Spyware and Adware. What, are the differences between these 5 types?

Viruses are programs that act like biological viruses. They replicate or make a copy of themselves in another host. Using an infected host, like USB Flash disks or drives, viruses infect your computer and wait until you insert another flash disc to infect. While waiting in your computer, viruses, depending on their code, could either slow down the system, mess up your file system, or even destroy your files.

Trojans are programs that do not replicate or copy themselves. Trojans are software that are made by would be hackers to spy on your computer and create what they call back doors. These programs are intentionally placed on your computer directly, where there is physical contact with the computer, or indirectly, where a copy is sent through your Email or even by an infected Flash Drive. The trojan would then be on your computer but it will neither replicate nor crawl to other computers connected to the infected computer.

Worms, on the other hand, are the ones that have the capability to crawl to any computer connected to the infected computer. Worms infect computers through the local network and even through the public networks. Worms infect others by scanning your network and infecting any computer connected to your network. Other Worms would scan your email software for email addresses and send a copy of themselves to your contacts and act like it was sent by you. Worms also have the capability to destroy your files depending on the code programmed into it. Worms also has the effect of slowing down your network speed since it would scan your network and send copies of itself. Worms eat up a lot of bandwidth in a network.

Spyware and Adware are almost the same. The difference of these two is the intent and the usage. Spyware as its name implies is used to spy your computer for any vulnerabilities. Adware on the other hand is used to constantly bug you with Advertisements. Normally known as Unwanted Pop-ups. Both, however, can infect you by websites, that without your permission, that copy or install these unwanted software into your computer. Spyware and Adware, are sometimes also considered as Trojans by other Antivirus Software since it does not replicate or crawl in the network but does damage to your computer.

Whichever type, these Malicious Software, is harmful to your computer and is a threat to your personal security. It is best to be able to early detect these software and be able to purge them out of your system. As prolonged, exposure to these Malicious Software is very damaging which could cause you to lose your data.

In Malware Part 2: Malware Detection and Removal, we will discus how to detect malware and some basic techniques in removing these Malicious Software.

on May 11, 2010 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Infected by 50 viruses acc to "security tool" (who wants my creditcardnumbers for fixing the problem for 79 dollars ...) kaos


yeh thats what they tell you > You have 50 viruses 10 key loggers 15 worms 25 trogens. so they scare you into parting with your money what a load of ****!! if your reelly worried download AVG FREE or Panda antivirus for a free scan and it fixes it too the cost 0.00

Apr 27, 2010 | Intel Pentum 4 3.2Ghz System (SYP32) PC...

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How to remove a virus/spyware infection off your PC


I remove viruses for a living and I wanted to share the ways that I remove and protect a PC from future infections.

I have learned that 95% of all computers have some form of anti-virus or anti-spyware preinstalled on the hard drive. 100% of the time it is trial subscription. Which means it will only last 30-60 days. If you do not renew your subscription your PC will eventually become infected.

Here is my plan of action.
1. Go to the control panel and chose software programs. This will show you what is installed. Look for Norton Anti-Virus or Live Update. Norton is the most common installed piece of software that I run into, so let's focus on Norton. If Norton Anti-Virus is not removed completely it will slow down your computer. It will cause your computer to become infected. It will cause blue screens. Believe me I know and I have cleaned hundreds of PCs'.
2. In order to completely remove Norton off your PC. You need click here. This will take you to the Norton uninstall utility page. Pick the version that you have and run it. Reboot your PC. Make sure Norton is removed by checking into the control panel and then go to program icon. This will bring up a list of programs that currently are installed on your PC. Make sure Norton or Live Update is not present. If it is highlight it and click on remove.
3. Now you need to download Malwarebytes, click here.
This is a FREE tool that will remove almost any infections that are out there and may be out there. I only use the FREE version and it has created a lot of business for me. Run it and make sure you update it. Then do a scan. A quick scan works most of the time. If any infections are found, just remove and reboot your PC. You should be virus free. If this does not work boot to safe mode and run Malwarebytes again. Your PC should be clean.
4. Now you need good Anti-Virus. I recommend Avast. Again the Free Home version works for me. If you really need the protection go for the Pro version. Click here for a Free home version of Avast. Install, register and reboot. Your PC is clean and you are now protected.

Check out my short video for more info. Click
Enjoy
R. Walker Sr.



on Mar 27, 2010 | PC Desktops

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Caught A Virus? If you've let your guard down--or even if you haven't--it can...


Caught A Virus?

If you've let your guard down--or even if you haven't--it can be hard to tell if your PC is infected. Here's what to do if you suspect the worst.


Heard this one before? You must run antivirus software and keep it up to date or else your PC will get infected, you'll lose all your data, and you'll incur the wrath of every e-mail buddy you unknowingly infect because of your carelessness.

You know they're right. Yet for one reason or another, you're not running antivirus software, or you are but it's not up to date. Maybe you turned off your virus scanner because it conflicted with another program. Maybe you got tired of upgrading after you bought Norton Antivirus 2001, 2002, and 2003. Or maybe your annual subscription of virus definitions recently expired, and you've put off renewing.

It happens. It's nothing to be ashamed of. But chances are, either you're infected right now, as we speak, or you will be very soon.

For a few days in late January, the Netsky.p worm was infecting about 2,500 PCs a day. Meanwhile the MySQL bot infected approximately 100 systems a minute (albeit not necessarily desktop PCs). As David Perry, global director of education for security software provider Trend Micro, puts it, "an unprotected [Windows] computer will become owned by a bot within 14 minutes."

Today's viruses, worms, and so-called bots--which turn your PC into a zombie that does the hacker's bidding (such as mass-mailing spam)--aren't going to announce their presence. Real viruses aren't like the ones in Hollywood movies that melt down whole networks in seconds and destroy alien spacecraft. They operate in the background, quietly altering data, stealing private operations, or using your PC for their own illegal ends. This makes them hard to spot if you're not well protected.

Is Your PC "Owned?"

I should start by saying that not every system oddity is due to a virus, worm, or bot. Is your system slowing down? Is your hard drive filling up rapidly? Are programs crashing without warning? These symptoms are more likely caused by Windows, or badly written legitimate programs, rather than malware. After all, people who write malware want to hide their program's presence. People who write commercial software put icons all over your desktop. Who's going to work harder to go unnoticed?

Other indicators that may, in fact, indicate that there's nothing that you need to worry about, include:

* An automated e-mail telling you that you're sending out infected mail. E-mail viruses and worms typically come from faked addresses.
* A frantic note from a friend saying they've been infected, and therefore so have you. This is likely a hoax. It's especially suspicious if the note tells you the virus can't be detected but you can get rid of it by deleting one simple file. Don't be fooled--and don't delete that file.

I'm not saying that you should ignore such warnings. Copy the subject line or a snippet from the body of the e-mail and plug it into your favorite search engine to see if other people have received the same note. A security site may have already pegged it as a hoax.

Sniffing Out an Infection

There are signs that indicate that your PC is actually infected. A lot of network activity coming from your system (when you're not actually using Internet) can be a good indicator that something is amiss. A good software firewall, such as ZoneAlarm, will ask your permission before letting anything leave your PC, and will give you enough information to help you judge if the outgoing data is legitimate. By the way, the firewall that comes with Windows, even the improved version in XP Service Pack 2, lacks this capability.

To put a network status light in your system tray, follow these steps: In Windows XP, choose Start, Control Panel, Network Connections, right-click the network connection you want to monitor, choose Properties, check "Show icon in notification area when connected," and click OK.

If you're interested in being a PC detective, you can sniff around further for malware. By hitting Ctrl-Alt-Delete in Windows, you'll bring up the Task Manager, which will show you the various processes your system is running. Most, if not all, are legit, but if you see a file name that looks suspicious, type it into a search engine and find out what it is.

Want another place to look? In Windows XP, click Start, Run, type "services.msc" in the box, and press Enter. You'll see detailed descriptions of the services Windows is running. Something look weird? Check with your search engine.

Finally, you can do more detective work by selecting Start, Run, and typing "msconfig" in the box. With this tool you not only see the services running, but also the programs that your system is launching at startup. Again, check for anything weird.

If any of these tools won't run--or if your security software won't run--that in itself is a good sign your computer is infected. Some viruses intentionally disable such programs as a way to protect themselves.

What to Do Next

Once you're fairly sure your system is infected, don't panic. There are steps you can take to assess the damage, depending on your current level of protection.

* If you don't have any antivirus software on your system (shame on you), or if the software has stopped working, stay online and go for a free scan at one of several Web sites. There's McAfee FreeScan, Symantec Security Check, and Trend Micro's HouseCall. If one doesn't find anything, try two. In fact, running a free online virus scan is a good way to double-check the work of your own local antivirus program. When you're done, buy or download a real antivirus program.
* If you have antivirus software, but it isn't active, get offline, unplug wires-- whatever it takes to stop your computer from communicating via the Internet. Then, promptly perform a scan with the installed software.
* If nothing seems to be working, do more research on the Web. There are several online virus libraries where you can find out about known viruses. These sites often provide instructions for removing viruses--if manual removal is possible--or a free removal tool if it isn't. Check out GriSOFT's Virus Encyclopedia, Eset's Virus Descriptions, McAffee's Virus Glossary, Symantec's Virus Encyclopedia, or Trend Micro's Virus Encyclopedia.

A Microgram of Prevention

Assuming your system is now clean, you need to make sure it stays that way. Preventing a breach of your computer's security is far more effective than cleaning up the mess afterwards. Start with a good security program, such Trend Micro's PC-Cillin, which you can buy for $50.

Don't want to shell out any money? You can cobble together security through free downloads, such as AVG Anti-Virus Free Edition, ZoneAlarm (a personal firewall), and Ad-Aware SE (an antispyware tool).

Just make sure you keep all security software up to date. The bad guys constantly try out new ways to fool security programs. Any security tool without regular, easy (if not automatic) updates isn't worth your money or your time.

Speaking of updating, the same goes for Windows. Use Windows Update (it's right there on your Start Menu) to make sure you're getting all of the high priority updates. If you run Windows XP, make sure to get the Service Pack 2 update. To find out if you already have it, right-click My Computer, and select Properties. Under the General tab, under System, it should say "Service Pack 2."

Here are a few more pointers for a virus-free life:

* Be careful with e-mail. Set your e-mail software security settings to high. Don't open messages with generic-sounding subjects that don't apply specifically to you from people you don't know. Don't open an attachment unless you're expecting it.
* If you have broadband Internet access, such as DSL or cable, get a router, even if you only have one PC. A router adds an extra layer of protection because your PC is not connecting directly with the Internet.
* Check your Internet ports. These doorways between your computer and the Internet can be open, in which case your PC is very vulnerable; closed, but still somewhat vulnerable; or stealthed (or hidden), which is safest. Visit Gibson Research's Web site and run the free ShieldsUP test to see your ports' status. If some ports show up as closed--or worse yet, open--check your router's documentation to find out how to hide them.

on Dec 02, 2009 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

I have purchased the norton 360 on line but unable to secure the other 2 computers at home with this as it only down load on the one. Please advise. Thanks Grace


be sure that you purchased the anti virus software which you can use on authentic serial key into several PC..

It is possible that your Norton 360 only works in single workstation.

Kindly post back and I'm glad to hear more info from you..

Hope this give you initial help on the problem.

May 08, 2008 | PC Desktops

3 Answers

Norton failed to detect worm.win32.netsky. My computer is infected with the virus and I need help. Patti


Hello Patti,

First, you need to update the Norton with the latest virus definitions and perform a scan again. It may detect the virus and remove it.

If it does not, we need to format the hard drive of the computer and reinstall the operating system as it is the most effective way to get rid of the virus.

Wish you good luck

Pat

Mar 11, 2008 | PC Desktops

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