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Computer cuts out

Say I go to Chess.com. That website comes on the screen, but if I try to sign up, the same message always come onto the screen -- "website busy, try again". I have Mozilla Firefox and cannot get Internet explorer to load. This is a three year old computer.

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  • Lee Hodgson
    Lee Hodgson May 11, 2010

    sounds more like your connection speed, are you on dial-up and how much memory has the system got?

  • Russ Andrews
    Russ Andrews May 11, 2010

    Which OS? XP?

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  • Master
  • 679 Answers

If you are connecting with a modem, you really can't play online games. You need a highspeed connection, wife and I are online gamers, and hav had a Cable modem/router for at least 10 years. It will drive you nuts otherwise.

Posted on Dec 15, 2008

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Start problem


All I see for the heading, romakavati, is - Fujitsu Barebone Systems.

Do I assume we are talking about a barebone Desktop Computer?

If so;

1) The plastic front of the desktop computer is the Front Panel.

The area of contact pins on the motherboard, that the wires from the Front panel go to, is the Front Panel header.

Do you have the wires from the Power On switch, connected CORRECTLY, to the Front Panel header?

(The Power On switch is located inside the plastic Power On button assembly. It is a style of ATX power on switch.

This is one example,

http://www.directron.com/atxswitch.html )

2) Your motherboard may require a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.
Example of cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

This is power for the Processor.

If your motherboard does require it, do you have it plugged in?

3) Do you know if the Power Supply is good?

Even if it is a new one, and came with the barebones computer you bought, it doesn't mean it is a good one.

May be a bad one, and doesn't even turn on.
May be a bad one, and one of the three main voltage power rails, is no good.

[ There are three main voltage power rails, in the Switched-Mode Power Supply, installed for your Fujitsu desktop computer.

A) The 3.3 Volt power rail

B) The 5 Volt power rail

C) The 12 Volt power rail

All are DC Voltage.

{In comparison two D cell flashlight batteries store 3 Volts DC. Just a fact you may be interested in ]

First see if the Power Supply will turn on. This is done with a jumper wire, on the Soft Power On wire, in the ATX main power cable's connector.

Your ATX main power cable may be a 20-pin ATX main power cable, or a 24-pin ATX main power cable,

A) 20-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

B) 24-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

With both power cables you will see there is a Green wire.
This is the Soft Power On wire.
Abbreviated as PS_ON.

A jumper wire is used to briefly connect the Green wire, to ANY Black wire.
ALL Black wires are Ground wires.

DO NOT cut the wires, or poke a hole in their insulation.

The preferred jumper wire is a paper clip.
The paper clip is straightened out _________________
,then bent into a U-shaped.

The middle of the U is wrapped a few times, with black plastic electrical tape. This area is for your fingers, and thumb to hold onto.

U-shaped jumper wire turned upside down, you have two 'legs'.
The legs go down into the socket holes, of the ATX main power cable's connector.

Let's look at the example for the 24-pin ATX main power cable, again,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

The 24-pin ATX main power cable needs to be plugged in, as shown in the photo to the far right.

Computer power supply is plugged into power.

One leg of the paper clip jumper wire, is inserted down into the socket hole, RIGHT NEXT TO the Green wire.

Goes down in the socket hole, slides past the insulation of the Green wire, and touches the metal terminal at the end of that wire.

The leg of the paper clip jumper wire, MUST go down in the socket hole far enough, to TOUCH that metal terminal end.

[ Metal terminal is a type of female Molex terminal. Tube shaped, and goes over a contact pin in the motherboard connector,

http://www.molex.com/molex/products/datasheet.jsp?part=active/0002081202_CRIMP_TERMINALS.xml&channel=Products&Lang=en-US ]

The other leg of the U-shaped paper clip jumper wire, goes down into
ANY socket hole, that has a Black wire in it.
ALL Black wires are Ground wires.

The contact made is no more than 2 seconds.
(The Power On switch is a Momentary Contact Switch)

IF, the Power Supply comes on, you either have a bad Power On switch, or it is Not connected correctly, in the Front Panel header on the motherboard.

IF, the Power Supply does Not come on, you have a bad Power Supply.
Plain, and simple.

IF, due to lack of a more detailed statement from you, that your problem is the Power Supply DOES come on, but Windows does not load;

A) You know the Window operating system is NOT on a new harddrive, right?
You have to install Windows on it.

B) Installing a harddrive with Windows already on it.

You know that when Windows is installed on a computer, (To the harddrive, actually), it assigns hash values to certain major components, right?

Certain major hardware components such as;
1) Processor
2) Motherboard chipset
3) BIOS program, and version.
4) Harddrive
5) Graphics chipset

Change any two, or more of these components, and Windows will want to be activated again. (Not registered,... Activated)

This is because Windows will 'think', you are taking it off of the harddrive it is on, and trying to install it on another harddrive, or computer.

Microsoft User's License states; "One GENUINE copy of Windows per
ONE computer"

[ Microsoft makes one Master disk. From it all GENUINE copies are made, and sold to the consumer ]

However, the Windows activation screen does NOT always come up.

Ready for your questions, and additional information you did not post.
Post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

May 20, 2012 | Fujitsu Barebone Systems

1 Answer

Hello my computer will not connect to my screen anymore. I have a LG lcd monitor and tv it was working yesterday wen i turned it off and 2day wen i turned computer on my screen won't get the signal....


Check the cables and if this doesn't work try a different screen. In the event that a different screen does not cure the problem you may have bigger problems. It could be Ram failure it could be Graphics card failure or it could even be HDD failure. Always try the easiest and cheapest bits first.

Feb 02, 2012 | Barebone Systems

3 Answers

Montior 14 inch montior ligt on but not disply what is problem


Is the monitor DVI + VGA? blue and white ports (2)?

If so, you may need to hit the source button to switch sources. This can happen rarely.

Another option is to try a different monitor to verify that it is indeed your monitor that is broken.

Good luck! :)

Feb 28, 2011 | Intel Barebone Systems

1 Answer

Tell me aboout boot sequence in bios setup


The system BIOS is what starts the computer running when you turn it on. The following are the steps that a typical boot sequence involves. Of course this will vary by the manufacturer of your hardware, BIOS, etc., and especially by what peripherals you have in the PC. Here is what generally happens when you turn on your system power:
The internal power supply turns on and initializes. The power supply takes some time until it can generate reliable power for the rest of the computer, and having it turn on prematurely could potentially lead to damage. Therefore, the chipset will generate a reset signal to the processor (the same as if you held the reset button down for a while on your case) until it receives the Power Good signal from the power supply.

When the reset button is released, the processor will be ready to start executing. When the processor first starts up, it is suffering from amnesia; there is nothing at all in the memory to execute. Of course processor makers know this will happen, so they pre-program the processor to always look at the same place in the system BIOS ROM for the start of the BIOS boot program. This is normally location FFFF0h, right at the end of the system memory. They put it there so that the size of the ROM can be changed without creating compatibility problems. Since there are only 16 bytes left from there to the end of conventional memory, this location just contains a "jump" instruction telling the processor where to go to find the real BIOS startup program.
The BIOS performs the power-on self test (POST). If there are any fatal errors, the boot process stops. POST beep codes can be found in this area of the Troubleshooting Expert.
The BIOS looks for the video card. In particular, it looks for the video card's built in BIOS program and runs it. This BIOS is normally found at location C000h in memory. The system BIOS executes the video card BIOS, which initializes the video card. Most modern cards will display information on the screen about the video card. (This is why on a modern PC you usually see something on the screen about the video card before you see the messages from the system BIOS itself).
The BIOS then looks for other devices' ROMs to see if any of them have BIOSes. Normally, the IDE/ATA hard disk BIOS will be found at C8000h and executed. If any other device BIOSes are found, they are executed as well.
The BIOS displays its startup screen.
The BIOS does more tests on the system, including the memory count-up test which you see on the screen. The BIOS will generally display a text error message on the screen if it encounters an error at this point; these error messages and their explanations can be found in this part of the Troubleshooting Expert.
The BIOS performs a "system inventory" of sorts, doing more tests to determine what sort of hardware is in the system. Modern BIOSes have many automatic settings and will determine memory timing (for example) based on what kind of memory it finds. Many BIOSes can also dynamically set hard drive parameters and access modes, and will determine these at roughly this time. Some will display a message on the screen for each drive they detect and configure this way. The BIOS will also now search for and label logical devices (COM and LPT ports).
If the BIOS supports the Plug and Play standard, it will detect and configure Plug and Play devices at this time and display a message on the screen for each one it finds. See here for more details on how PnP detects devices and assigns resources.
The BIOS will display a summary screen about your system's configuration. Checking this page of data can be helpful in diagnosing setup problems, although it can be hard to see because sometimes it flashes on the screen very quickly before scrolling off the top.
The BIOS begins the search for a drive to boot from. Most modern BIOSes contain a setting that controls if the system should first try to boot from the floppy disk (A:) or first try the hard disk (C:). Some BIOSes will even let you boot from your CD-ROM drive or other devices, depending on the boot sequence BIOS setting.
Having identified its target boot drive, the BIOS looks for boot information to start the operating system boot process. If it is searching a hard disk, it looks for a master boot record at cylinder 0, head 0, sector 1 (the first sector on the disk); if it is searching a floppy disk, it looks at the same address on the floppy disk for a volume boot sector.
If it finds what it is looking for, the BIOS starts the process of booting the operating system, using the information in the boot sector. At this point, the code in the boot sector takes over from the BIOS. The DOS boot process is described in detail here. If the first device that the system tries (floppy, hard disk, etc.) is not found, the BIOS will then try the next device in the boot sequence, and continue until it finds a bootable device.
If no boot device at all can be found, the system will normally display an error message and then freeze up the system. What the error message is depends entirely on the BIOS, and can be anything from the rather clear "No boot device available" to the very cryptic "NO ROM BASIC - SYSTEM HALTED". This will also happen if you have a bootable hard disk partition but forget to set it active.

Dec 15, 2010 | HP Barebone Systems

1 Answer

I was sent a large collection of family photos from a cousin, on a CD. I put it in the drive and the computer does nothing. After about a minute the computer kicks it back out. My brother tried it on his...


Another possible way of transferring the family photos is to have your brother put the photos onto a usb and then plug it into yours and just drag and drop the pictures onto your computer

Jul 23, 2010 | Barebone Systems

1 Answer

Ntldr is missing


Reset/Update BIOS and try to change the boot priority.

Jun 01, 2010 | IBM NetVista Intel Pentium 3 1GHz / 256MB...

1 Answer

How to download files onto USB flash memory


Just plug the memory stick into your USB port on the computer. Windows has the drivers already installed. A taskbar icon will appeer us a connected USB device, exacly as a digital camera would. You will find the stick in My Computer as a removalble drive. Click on the right side mouse button over the flash drive icon and click properties to see the stick memory size, ect.... Use it as you would any other removable dirve, ie: 3.5" floppy disk, CD Read/Write. I would go to the TOOLS button for the drive and click FORMAT for you first use of the stick to test its memory. After that you can just copy, save, drag and drop files like always....

Apr 09, 2009 | Shuttle XPC SD32G2 Barebone

1 Answer

Vista unable to install Futura software


Hi,

Don't dispair, they have fixed this! Go to the following page:

http://www.futura-support.com/downloads/patch.htm#

Good luck!

Sep 26, 2008 | Barebone Systems

1 Answer

Trying to install new hp photosmart c4200 all in one series.All goes well on installion until message pops up stating driver can not be installed because it is not digitally signed or not signed in the...


hi
go to my computer properties
then driver signing
then check 3 rd option button is true or false
it must clear.
then install driver
best of luck

Mar 27, 2008 | Barebone Systems

1 Answer

Initially I installed HP Photosmart C4280 without any problem om my PC (Vista). Then I had to format the PC, and it took some research in order to get the printer up and running again. However, when I...


goto start, right click on my computer,go to properties, click on the tab that says hardware. once your in there you should not see any red or yellow warning signs. look for your device and if you see there is an error by it you can do a few thing. if you right click the device you can update the driver first. then reboot. if that doesnt go through the same process but uninstall the driver then reboot. Make sure that hp doesnt have an update for that printer on there website. hope it works for you.

Feb 15, 2008 | Barebone Systems

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