Question about FIC Samba SM-1845 (SM1845GV) Barebone

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Computer won't boot on start

No video at all, fans run, hard drive light comes on steady...on for awhile then out.
I have tried a new video card, new pwr supply, reseated the ram, etc.
No help!!
thanks, Bob

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  • Russ Andrews
    Russ Andrews May 11, 2010

    Possible bad video...are there any beep codes when you fire it up?

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  • 145 Answers

Sound like you have a bad mother board

Posted on Dec 16, 2008

  • Lawrence Walters Dec 16, 2008

    sound like you have a bad mother board

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1 Answer

Asus p5nd motherboard won't start when power button is pushed, but the motherboard light stays on..


Most probably your power supply. An SLI rig will draw a lot of power for the graphics and for a power supply in a system like this to have lasted 5 years is amazing. They don't last forever. You could buy a PSU tester (about 10 GBP) and confirm it. But if you have to buy a new one look for one that is at least 25percent more powerful than your old one and has at least a bronze efficiency rating. (silver would be better) and buy one from a known brand such as Antec, Chillmaster, or OCZ.

Mar 16, 2013 | ASUS P5ND nForce 750i SLI Motherboard...

1 Answer

Can not boot up computer


possible your hard drive

A hard disk failure can be catastrophic if it jeopardizes the data stored on your computer.


In addition to rendering a laptop inoperable, a failed hard disk can damage other files stored on the drive as well.


It is critical to determine whether an actual drive failure has taken place, and there are several steps to troubleshoot a drive before hard disk failure can be declared.



Unplug any devices such as printers, speakers, cameras and other external peripherals. Boot the laptop by pressing the power key.


If this does not result in a successful boot, try booting Windows in "Safe Mode."

Reboot the computer, and hold down the F8 key this will vary depending on your computer and operating system


From the menu choices, choose "Boot Windows in Safe Mode".


If the boot up progresses, then the computer is likely experiencing a software issue, not a hard drive failure.


Reset the hard drive.


This will involve turning off laptop (removing the battery is a good move, too) opening the laptop unit, and unplugging all connections and cables from the hard drive.


If possible, replace the hard drive with another drive.

This will help determine if the hard drive is causing the problem.


Plug all connections back in to the hard drive, and reboot the computer.

Repeat Step 2 if necessary.


If the computer does not reboot, the laptop is more than likely experiencing a hard drive failure and will probably have to be repaired by vendor.


hope this helps




Oct 09, 2012 | mpc X3000 Laptop Transport 14.1" Barebone

1 Answer

Media test failure message. Reboot and Select proper boot device


A hard disk failure can be catastrophic if it jeopardizes the data stored on your computer.


In addition to rendering a laptop inoperable, a failed hard disk can damage other files stored on the drive as well.


It is critical to determine whether an actual drive failure has taken place, and there are several steps to troubleshoot a drive before hard disk failure can be declared.



Unplug any devices such as printers, speakers, cameras and other external peripherals. Boot the laptop by pressing the power key.


If this does not result in a successful boot, try booting Windows in "Safe Mode."

Reboot the computer, and hold down the F8 key this will vary depending on your computer and operating system


From the menu choices, choose "Boot Windows in Safe Mode".


If the boot up progresses, then the computer is likely experiencing a software issue, not a hard drive failure.


Reset the hard drive.


This will involve turning off laptop (removing the battery is a good move, too) opening the laptop unit, and unplugging all connections and cables from the hard drive.


If possible, replace the hard drive with another drive.

This will help determine if the hard drive is causing the problem.


Plug all connections back in to the hard drive, and reboot the computer.

Repeat Step 2 if necessary.


If the computer does not reboot, the laptop is more than likely experiencing a hard drive failure and will probably have to be repaired by vendor.


hope this helps




Oct 09, 2012 | mpc X3000 Laptop Transport 14.1" Barebone

1 Answer

Shuttle won't boot up


test all leads that attach to your hard drive including electrical extensions IDE or SATA

the leads from your (motherboard to your hard drive) make sure they have a secure dust free connections and are not faulty or just replace them they could be faulty


make sure all leads that are attached to your drives dvd\cd have secure connections and are not faulty


even something as small as an electrical extension or a faulty fan lead can cause you problems computer needs all of the data and power to travel through every working device and to have an end for a computer to be able work properly


a motherboard and a hard drive any leads between them will fail before your motherboard or your hard drive check all electrical extensions make sure they are securely seated even the cd/dvd drives need to have current go through make sure these devices are working


check the CPU make sure it has thermal paste and dust free secure seating


also check your computer ram modules and cmos battery make sure it has charge and they are dust free and securely seated some motherboards cmos batteries are soldered in


hope it helps

Jun 24, 2012 | Shuttle Computer Shuttle Xpc X27d-bk-v1...

1 Answer

My MSI computer won't startup. It has an


It appears that you have only checked the power supply and the on/off button. There are many reasons a computer won't start.
These are only two. Have you "stripped down" the system? This means removing everything but the CPU, Memory, and video card. If it starts with only these things attached, then you can rule out the mainboard, memory, and video.
Next remove the memory. If it starts but you get memory error beeps, then it could be one of the memory modules.
After all that, you can then figure it's the mainboard or the CPU.
As for circuit diagram, I would think these would be very hard to find.

Jun 18, 2011 | MSI Barebone Systems

2 Answers

I have HCL Beanstalk Desktop, Monitor - Samsung Syncmaster 794MG. I don't have a ups. I get frequent powercuts in here resulting in interrupted shutdown of the computer. Sometimes while playing a game...


You seem to have a corrupt display card. Is it on board or do you have a separate graphics card installed in your PC. Either way on restart graphics processor is not turning on. What does the Power and HDD indicator on the PC show during boot up. You could also have damaged the Hard Disk because of your abrupt shutdowns. You can open the side cover and try disconnecting the HDD power (Yellow, Black & Red ) cable and IDE ( 40 pin flat ribbon wire ) cable and try restarting. If your monitor starts up and shows BIOS page you have a faulty HDD. Also see if the processor fan is a working when you start the PC. If not you have a failed mother board. Are you getting the boot up RAM beep. If not before you do any of the above mentioned things Just pull out the RAM ( with PC unplugged ) and reinsert into the slot. It might get your PC working after all

Mar 08, 2011 | MSI Barebone Systems

1 Answer

Tell me aboout boot sequence in bios setup


The system BIOS is what starts the computer running when you turn it on. The following are the steps that a typical boot sequence involves. Of course this will vary by the manufacturer of your hardware, BIOS, etc., and especially by what peripherals you have in the PC. Here is what generally happens when you turn on your system power:
The internal power supply turns on and initializes. The power supply takes some time until it can generate reliable power for the rest of the computer, and having it turn on prematurely could potentially lead to damage. Therefore, the chipset will generate a reset signal to the processor (the same as if you held the reset button down for a while on your case) until it receives the Power Good signal from the power supply.

When the reset button is released, the processor will be ready to start executing. When the processor first starts up, it is suffering from amnesia; there is nothing at all in the memory to execute. Of course processor makers know this will happen, so they pre-program the processor to always look at the same place in the system BIOS ROM for the start of the BIOS boot program. This is normally location FFFF0h, right at the end of the system memory. They put it there so that the size of the ROM can be changed without creating compatibility problems. Since there are only 16 bytes left from there to the end of conventional memory, this location just contains a "jump" instruction telling the processor where to go to find the real BIOS startup program.
The BIOS performs the power-on self test (POST). If there are any fatal errors, the boot process stops. POST beep codes can be found in this area of the Troubleshooting Expert.
The BIOS looks for the video card. In particular, it looks for the video card's built in BIOS program and runs it. This BIOS is normally found at location C000h in memory. The system BIOS executes the video card BIOS, which initializes the video card. Most modern cards will display information on the screen about the video card. (This is why on a modern PC you usually see something on the screen about the video card before you see the messages from the system BIOS itself).
The BIOS then looks for other devices' ROMs to see if any of them have BIOSes. Normally, the IDE/ATA hard disk BIOS will be found at C8000h and executed. If any other device BIOSes are found, they are executed as well.
The BIOS displays its startup screen.
The BIOS does more tests on the system, including the memory count-up test which you see on the screen. The BIOS will generally display a text error message on the screen if it encounters an error at this point; these error messages and their explanations can be found in this part of the Troubleshooting Expert.
The BIOS performs a "system inventory" of sorts, doing more tests to determine what sort of hardware is in the system. Modern BIOSes have many automatic settings and will determine memory timing (for example) based on what kind of memory it finds. Many BIOSes can also dynamically set hard drive parameters and access modes, and will determine these at roughly this time. Some will display a message on the screen for each drive they detect and configure this way. The BIOS will also now search for and label logical devices (COM and LPT ports).
If the BIOS supports the Plug and Play standard, it will detect and configure Plug and Play devices at this time and display a message on the screen for each one it finds. See here for more details on how PnP detects devices and assigns resources.
The BIOS will display a summary screen about your system's configuration. Checking this page of data can be helpful in diagnosing setup problems, although it can be hard to see because sometimes it flashes on the screen very quickly before scrolling off the top.
The BIOS begins the search for a drive to boot from. Most modern BIOSes contain a setting that controls if the system should first try to boot from the floppy disk (A:) or first try the hard disk (C:). Some BIOSes will even let you boot from your CD-ROM drive or other devices, depending on the boot sequence BIOS setting.
Having identified its target boot drive, the BIOS looks for boot information to start the operating system boot process. If it is searching a hard disk, it looks for a master boot record at cylinder 0, head 0, sector 1 (the first sector on the disk); if it is searching a floppy disk, it looks at the same address on the floppy disk for a volume boot sector.
If it finds what it is looking for, the BIOS starts the process of booting the operating system, using the information in the boot sector. At this point, the code in the boot sector takes over from the BIOS. The DOS boot process is described in detail here. If the first device that the system tries (floppy, hard disk, etc.) is not found, the BIOS will then try the next device in the boot sequence, and continue until it finds a bootable device.
If no boot device at all can be found, the system will normally display an error message and then freeze up the system. What the error message is depends entirely on the BIOS, and can be anything from the rather clear "No boot device available" to the very cryptic "NO ROM BASIC - SYSTEM HALTED". This will also happen if you have a bootable hard disk partition but forget to set it active.

Dec 15, 2010 | HP Barebone Systems

1 Answer

My pc boots but no video is displayed so my only guess it the onboard video on the motherboard is faulty. can i buy another video card and remedy the problem?


You can indeed install another video card, but this may not be your trouble. Are you absolutely sure your computer is running normally except for the video? That is, do you hear all the other sounds that usually go along with normal startup (hard drive activity, Windows startup sounds through the speakers, etc.)? It's very unusual for a motherboard to fail so that everything works except for video out to the monitor. You might be facing a computer with some other issues, like memory or a deeper motherboard problem, causing it not to start.

If you do decide to install a new video card, be sure you get one that's compatible with the motherboard (proper type connector) and power supply (not a super whiz-bang card that may need more power than your current supply can provide).

Mar 27, 2010 | Barebone Systems

1 Answer

Turn on computer, no post


Power to motherboard doesn't mean it still alive ...

Sorry for your loss

Aug 08, 2008 | Barebone Systems

1 Answer

Barebones troubleshooting


Lex -

I would first check your ram, make sure its the right type and rating for the motherboard. Although most systems will beep at post for a memory issue, sometimes reseating the memory alone can clear up a startup hang.

If the memory is seated okay, the right type and speed rating, try using a different video card in the system. Its possible that the system is starting up normally, but not being displayed.

If neither of those help, minimize the system. Plug in just the bare minimum needed for operation - Power supply, processor, heat sink & fan, a single memory stick, a single hard drive, video card(if its not integrated on the motherboard). Plug in a monitor and the power cord, then see if the system boots.

If all that still fails, verify that the CPU fan AND the Power Supply fan are spinning when power is on. If so, this points to either a bad memory stick(try another), bad processor(if available, try one at a slower or faster speed), or bad motherboard.

Hope this helps!
-thinstatic

Jun 13, 2008 | MSI MBOX KM4M-L (ms-6734bb-040) Barebone

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