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Turntable buzz / ground loop problem - Audio Players & Recorders

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Hi!

I'm not sure what you are asking. The ground loop is specifically intended to reduce or eliminate buzz/hum from the turntable. If the ground loop is in place and connected as per the instructions with your turntable/receiver, these noises should not be an issue in a modern system. I would make sure that your connection is solid and at a good ground point (easy to check if you have an ohm-meter/multi-meter (which comes in handy for many things and can be had very inexpensively). If the wire is broken, it can be replaced with any wire of the same or heavier gauge.

If I've failed to understand your problem, please post more detail and I will try again. If not, please let me know if this is helpful. Good luck with your problem.

Bob

Posted on Oct 09, 2008

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Grounding issue


The preferred approach is to run a ground cable from the turntable to the ground post on the back of your preamp or receiver. This keeps buzz and hum out of the audio signal. If your receiver doesn't have a ground post, you'll have to connect the ground to one of the RCA signal jacks. In both cases the question is, when you have two grounds, which one to connect? You'll have to determine this by trial and error. My guess is you'll get the best results by connecting both, so start with this arrangement. Connect the turntable's audio cables from its RCA jacks to the receiver, select the phono input, and turn it on (with the volume turned down). Turn up the volume until you can hear hum or buzz. Then connect a piece of wire to the ground post on the turntable panel and touch the other end to the ground post on the receiver or to the RCA jack/plug's outer ring. If the hum/buzz goes away, you're good to go and can connect the wire permanently. If not, try the ground cables individually and use the connection that works best.

Sep 29, 2014 | Numark TT1510 Turntable

1 Answer

Sony ps-lx250H loud buzzing sound


That is where the problem is, get a long insulated wire, bare both ends and attach one end to the turntable and the ground screw of the amp, use one screw on the chassis on the turntable and bare the metal for good ground connection.

Jul 20, 2012 | Sony PS-LX250H Turntable

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After a power outage I have a loud hum.


Hi, The Ground Rules Of all the annoyances that can afflict any audio/video home theater or even a simple stereo installation, the notorious "ground loop" may well be the most difficult and persistent one to track down and eliminate. A "ground loop" is caused by the difference in electrical potential at different grounding points in an audio/video system. (All the grounds in an A/V system should ideally be at "0" potential.) A ground loop typically adds a loud low-frequency hum or buzz as soon as you plug in any of various audio or video components, including subwoofers, cable-TV outboard boxes, satellite-TV feeds, TV displays, amplifiers, A/V receivers or turntables. The buzz/hum is a byproduct of the multiple power supply cables and a ground voltage differential within your system and its network of interconnecting cables.

Here are some methods to help you get rid of ground loops. Try these first and don't waste money on a power "conditioner" which, in most cases, won't help. (There is no need to "condition" the AC power for your system. Your receiver or amplifier already has a power supply with its own filters and transformers. No further filtering is normally required.)

If you get your system up and running and hear an audible buzz or hum, the first culprit to look at is either the powered subwoofer or your cable-TV or satellite-box feed at the entry point to your system.

First, the subwoofer: unplug the coaxial cable that connects to your powered subwoofer to see if the ground-loop hum disappears. If it does, it's likely coming in through your cable/satellite TV feed.

Reconnect your subwoofer's coaxial cable from the subwoofer input to your receiver's subwoofer output and disconnect the cable-TV feed (or satellite feed) from your outboard set-top cable box or satellite tuner. Be sure and disconnect the cable before any splitters. Now see if the hum/buzz from your subwoofer stops.

If that eliminates the hum, you can install one of these inexpensive in-line ground isolators from Parts Express or Bass Home. Note that these transformer-based ground isolators will work fine with analog cable-TV feeds, but depending on their design they may interfere with or block reception of HDTV signals via a digital cable or satellite dish feed.

Install the ground isolator between the cable-TV feed and the input of your outboard cable-TV box or satellite tuner (or the TV display's antenna or cable input if you have a set with a built-in TV tuner or a cable-card ready set). In many cases, the ground isolator will "break" the loop and remove the annoying hum or buzz by isolating the TV-cable ground.

If a hum remains with the TV cable completely disconnected from your system, or you don't want to risk degrading reception of HD signals from a cable or satellite system, then you may have to add a ground isolator like this Radio Shack Model 270-054 between the line-level coaxial subwoofer cable from your A/V receiver and the line-level input jack on your powered subwoofer.

In all cases, if your subwoofer has a ground-lift screw like some of Axiom's subwoofers, try first removing the screw (or replacing it) to see if it increases or eliminates the hum. It may or may not make a difference.

If you do not have easy access to the aforementioned ground isolators, here are a few more tips:

Try plugging the subwoofer into a different AC outlet in the room, one that isn't supplying power to your components (A/V receiver, TV, cable box, etc.). That might fix it.

Try reversing the AC plug for your A/V receiver or the powered subwoofer. If it's a 3-wire plug or a polarized plug, which has one prong wider than the other, you won't be able to reverse the plug. For safety, do not use a "cheater plug" to bypass the 3-wire plug.

With the power OFF, reverse the AC plugs one by one of any other components that have a standard 2-prong AC plug that isn't polarized. Each time you reverse a plug, turn on the system with the attached component and your subwoofer and see if the hum disappears. In some cases, reversing one or more plugs will eliminate the hum.

If you have a turntable, try connecting a separate ground wire to a chassis screw on your preamp or receiver and see if the hum disappears. If you already have a turntable ground wire, try removing it from the preamp. One or the other may eliminate the hum.

Finally, here is another solution that worked well for a member of our message boards who decided to discard his ground-loop isolator on his subwoofer: "I took off the ground-loop isolator I'd been using and connected a plain 14-gauge wire to chassis screws on the sub and the receiver then powered everything on. Although hum was still there, it was far lower than before. Next I unscrewed the ground-loop screw on the back of the sub and that took care of the hum completely."

Almost certainly sounds like an earth loop to me, but can be caused by a poorly made transformer or phase shifts on the mains supply. Visit some power conditioner web-sites like Isotek or Isol-8 (or google "earth loop") where there's plenty of advice on how to reduce/eliminate earth loops and other causes of mains-induced hum (transformer problems etc).

Hum on the speakers usually indicates that there is a DC voltage on the speaker line. DC voltage on the output lines would be caused by a shorted output transistor.


Have a nice day...

Feb 16, 2011 | Cambridge Soundworks BassCube 12 Speaker

1 Answer

My teac p-595 turntable has a grounding wire that is looped at one end but I don't know where the loop goes. The wire on the other end is fastened to the receiver.


The ground wire should be attached to the metal chassis or the tone arm metal assembly, the other end should be attached to the metal chassis of the amplifier. If the ground wire is not used, you will get real loud hum through the amplifier.

Nov 23, 2010 | Teac P-A688 Turntable

1 Answer

Should their be an earth/ground wire+fitting from the turntable also/or just switch on/off for play through aux?


You should use earth ground.

Inspect the power cord and look for a metal screen at the rear of the turntable.

Using earth ground will avoid "ground loop"

That's multiple path ways to ground.

Use one single wire and link all your audio equipment together and ground it.

Aug 16, 2010 | Aiwa PX-E860 Turntable

1 Answer

My technics 1200 hums when connected to the amp even when the power cord is disconnected.


Is the ground wire from the deck connected to the mixer?.

If everything is connected ok then the ground wire or phono cord could be faulty - look here for replacements :-
http://stores.ebay.co.uk/methleykev

Could also be a "ground loop" - try a ground loop isolator.

Jun 26, 2010 | Technics SL-1200 Turntable

2 Answers

Humming/buzzing in aftermarket stereo when accelerating vehicle.


i once installed spark plug resistors (arrestors) that are supposed to help

Nov 06, 2009 | RCA Pac Sni1 Rca Ground Loop Noise...

1 Answer

Buzz....hum problem from turntable....


Did you ground the turntable? Most of them have a ground wire located somewhere that connects to a screw on your electrical outlet. You could be getting hum from your pre-amp if it is a low quality one. Try unhooking the pre-amp, if that is the problem you won't hear the hum. If the turntable ground is the problem you won't hear music with no pre-amp but you will still hear the hum.

Jan 11, 2009 | Technics SL-BD20D Turntable

2 Answers

Pioneer PL-570 turntable (c.1973)


Yes first check is that the Gnd wire from your turntable is connected to the Gnd (ground) post at the back of your amplifier with a good clean tight connection.
If the problem persists, check ALL your hi-fi components mains plugs for earth connections including your turntable, then remove the earth connections on all but one component so that you are left with only item earthed.
What does sometimes cause problems is if 2 or more hi-fi separates are earthed and connected to each other the earth cables along with the hi-fi interconnects form an inductive loop that picks up interferance such as mains hum etc.
Regards John

Sep 16, 2008 | Pioneer PL-990 Turntable

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