Question about Whirlpool LER5636P Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Fridgeidaire clothes dryer

I hooked 10 gauge wires to a receptacle and wired the two hot leads to two 20 amp breakers i wired the white wire to a neutral pole inside the breaker box and the copper to a ground pole. one of the 20 amp breakers sparked and kicked off. i replaced the two breakers with a double 30 amp breaker and now i have no power to the dryer the double 30 amp breaker kicked off
Please help

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that gotĀ 5 achievements.

    Sergeant:

    An expert that hasĀ over 500 points.

    Champion:

    An expert who has answered 200 questions.

  • Expert
  • 324 Answers

I will try this again i don't think i posted it properly.
On the power cord where it connectes to the dryer make sure the red and black wire goes to the outside screws (L1& L2) the white goes in the middle and the green goes to the dryer cabinet.
If you have the red or black going to the middle one it will trip the breaker.

Posted on Nov 03, 2008

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Dryer doesnt heat L1 to N is 120/ L2 to N is 3?/ L1 to L2 is 30???


Electric dryers are 240 volt. You must have a 30 amp 240v receptacle to plug it into. The cord on the dryer must have a compatible plug.
The circuit should not be shared with anything else, and should be protected with a 2-pole 30 amp circuit breaker.

It is possible for only one side of a 2-pole breaker to pop. When that happens one of the "hot" terminals would be dead and would account for the weird voltage readings you're getting which are just stray voltages from the one good side bleeding back. So Check your breaker first. You should get 120v on each terminal of the breaker and 240v between them. The cable leading from it should be 3-wire (red, black, white). It may, or may not, also have a seperate (bare) ground wire.

Then check voltages at the receptacle. You should get 120v between each hot side and the neutral, and 240v between the two hot terminals. If not, then check the wiring connections at the breaker and at the receptacle. Switch off the main breaker (or pull the disconnect) before doing that.

If voltages OK at the receptacle, but not at the control board then replace the power cord.

The ground wire should be fastened to a cold water pipe with a clamp designed for that purpose unless your power cord and receptacle have a separate (4th) terminal for the ground.




Apr 15, 2014 | Whirlpool Dryers

1 Answer

How do i know when 220 circuit breakers are bad


Always match breaker and wire size:
http://waterheatertimer.org/Color-codewire.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-replace-circuit-breaker.html

Feel if breaker is getting warm.
Listen for crackling sound.
Breaker is tripping.
Move wires to another same-size circuit breaker and see if problem continues.

Check watt or amp load on breaker.
For example water heater label shows 4500 watt non-simultaneous.
4500 watts divided by 240 volts = 18.75 amps.
You might think 20 amp breaker was good in this case.
However electricians use 80% safe maximum.
20 amp breaker x 80% safe max = 16 amps.
Water heater is 18.75 amps, so install 30 amp breaker.
30 amp breaker uses 10 gauge wire.
This means wire to breaker will run cool and not get hot, so breaker lasts longer, and there is more efficiency.
Using 80% safe maximum rule protects home, reduces heat wear on breakers and breaker box so everything lasts longer.

Nov 18, 2012 | Dryers

2 Answers

I have a Kenmore Series 70 Dryer and it keeps blowing the main breaker on the electricity panel - the main fuse is 20 amps do i have a dryer or fuse issue ?


Your dryer needs at least a 30 amp breaker to operate correctly. Changing to a 30 amp breaker should solve your problem. Hope this helps

Sep 01, 2011 | Dryers

1 Answer

Dryer is tripping all electric in the garage everytime it is put on any ideas why? (looked at plug, checked wiring, changed fuse, emptied water and fluff filter)


First of all, if your dryer is tripping ALL the electric in the garage, you may be overloading the circuit capacity of the garage service. A major appliance such as a dryer should have its own dedicated circuit. That is, a circuit that ONLY the dryer is connected to with a separate service breaker. You may not have a problem with the appliance at all. It may be just be a matter of overloading. You should have a 220 VAC circuit breaker rated at a minimum of 30 amps for an ELECTRIC dryer. Or, a 120VAC circuit breaker rated at 15 to 20 amps for a GAS dryer.

You may also want to check to make sure you have the appliance wired correctly. If this is an ELECTRIC dryer, the following link explains how the appliance needs to wired:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3575913-installing_a_220_vac_appliance_cord

If you have a GAS dryer, it should use a 110-120VAC configuration using either 14 gauge wiring for a 15 amp breaker and 12 gauge wiring for a 20amp. The power cord should be of the three-prong variety (HOT, NEUTRAL and GROUND). The color code for the wiring is as follows:

BLACK - HOT (110-120VAC)
WHITE - NEUTRAL (0 VAC)
GREEN - GROUND (Usually wired to a terminal lug at the terminal block on the appliance)

If you're dryer is already configured with a dedicated circuit breaker, please post back with a MODEL NUMBER and WHICH fuse you are referring to that is blowing. I hope this information is helpful.

Apr 25, 2011 | Dryers

2 Answers

How to hook up a 4 wire plug to a Maytag clothes dryer model LDE8824ACM with 3 wire connecters.


So you have an, ahem... problem....you have a Code compliant dryer (with it's 4 wire cord and plug)....and have moved into an older home that is not Code compliant (with it's 3 prong receptacle outlet)....and this is fairly common.

At this point - you have two choices....replace the wiring from the dryer's breaker to the receptacle with all new 8/3 with ground romex (it more then likely only has 8/2 with ground now)....and replace the receptacle with a 4 prong grounding receptacle to match your dryer's cord....OR - as an alternative - you can replace the cord on your dryer with a 3 prong cord to match the existing dryer receptacle outlet.

Out of the 2 choices....the first one will bring the old wiring in the home up to current Codes (all NEW homes must have this 4 wire/4 prong set-up per Code...but older homes are grand-fathered)...but it is clearly the most involved, time consuming and most costly approach...and it is recommended only an electrician do this work. If this approach is taken....your dryer cord can stay as is...it will now fit the new receptacle outlet with no modifications.

The second approach - is to pick up a 3 wire 3 prong cord at your local hardware store to match the existing 3 prong receptacle.....and replace the 4 wire cord on your dryer with it. Although this is the least desireable - it is an allowed approach because this is an older home with existing wiring. This is a much less involved approach...all you need to buy is the 3 wire dryer cord (they come all ready to go) remove the 4 wire cord and install the 3 wire cord to your electrical connections at the back of the dryer. Hopefully...when the 4 wire cord was installed on your dryer, the ground strap wasn't removed completely (this is a metal strap that will connect the white wire to the metal frame of the dryer)...because now you will need to re-use the ground strap. For more on this....see the images of the differences of the 3 wire and 4 wire dryer hook-up at:
http://www.applianceaid.com/general.html#3to4

NOTE: the only real difference between the 3 wire cord and the 4 wire cord is now the white neutral and the ground are kept seperate in a 4 wire..the green ground will connect directly to the dryer frame....where in a 3 wire there is no seperate ground wire - ground and neutral are one and the same...the ground strap connects the frame to the white neutral. The 4 wire permits a better safety measure...in the event of an electrical problem (ground fault) in the dryer...the fault now has a seperate path to your panel's ground...and less chance of a shock from touching the metal frame of the dryer.

The choice of how to proceed is up to you....if you go with completely updating the dryer wiring from the breaker outward...I recommend an electrician do this work for you (it's about an hour's work...plus materials). Then your exisiting dryer's 4 wire 4 prong cord can stay as is....the electrician will install a 4 prong receptacle made to fit your cord.

If you go with simply replacing the dryer's cord....changing it to a 3 wire so it will fit the receptacle...make sure the ground strap is re-utilized as seen in the images at the site above.(also make sure all work is done with the dryer breaker (or fuse if a really old home) off before starting any work. If you change the cord yourself...make sure to reconnect in exactly the same manner as the previous cord was connected...(make a note on paper or take pictures so that there are no mistakes)..and that you tighten the nuts securely to the posts once the wire lugs are on them. Where you state you do not have a background in electrical work...you can have an electrician change this cord for you...(typically in under a half-hour)....or you can do it yourself - by carefully following the pictures.

The choice is yours...if it was me - I'd change the wiring from the breaker outward...making the older home meet today's current Codes and be complaint for this dryer..and then you wouldn't need to change a thing on the dryer....but you can go either way....Codes allow this grandfathering in older homes with existing wiring.

Feb 09, 2010 | Dryers

1 Answer

2 12/2AWG = 1 10/3AWG


yes, with a double run of 12-2w/ground you'll end up with 2pairs of 12 for your 2 hot phases(you will need to mark one pair red to substantiate the 2 different phases) and each 12 gauge wire will carry 20 amp each alone, then you'll have 2 pairs of 12 with white insulation white for neutral is fine but the other pair for the safety ground will need to be marked or painted green where ever visible per N.E.C. i.e. main panel or dryer receptacle or hardwired into the unit itself,use 10-3w/ground its cheaper in the long run and you dont have to run a doubleheader

Sep 27, 2009 | Dryers

1 Answer

I have a closet clothes dryer with a grounded plug that has one prong perpendicular to the other. Can I just replace the outlet with one that will fit the plug, or do I need to add a different electrical...


You only noted three prongs: ground, vertical and horizontal, so I am guessing (since I can not see it) that you have a 240V 20 Amp plug on your dryer. There should be a number on the face of the plug that tells what type it is (my guess: NEMA 6-20). As long as you have a minimum of #12 (20 Amp) 3-conductor cord feeding the existing outlet, you can purchase a new outlet, that matches your plug, and replace it. Verify the voltage and amperage required by reading the label that is on the back of the dryer or in the owners manual to be sure you get the right one. You will also need to verify the wiring and breaker at the main panel. Be sure that the wires go to a two-pole breaker that is rated for 20 Amps (or whatever the dryer is rated for) and not two individual breakers. If the dryer is rated 20 amps make sure you have a minimum of #12 gauge wire, if the dryer is rated 30 Amps, the wire needs to be #10 gauge.

Sep 12, 2009 | Maytag Dryers

1 Answer

Dryer 4 tp 3 pring cord install


Hello wgirdler,
While it is preferred to upgrade the receptacle to a 4-prong type (which includes Neutral & Ground) Code requirements grandfather in 3-prong receptacles in older homes. So if your preference is to remove and replace the power cord on your dryer, make sure you get one that is designed for a dryer application and is 10/3 type. ( 10 Gauge wire with 3 conductors)...
Unplug the original 4 prong plug from the receptacle and pull the dryer away from the wall to gain access to the back of it.
Next, loosen the cord clamp that allows the cord to pass thru the back panel and into the druer compartment.
Open the access cover to where the end of that cord is terminated on a terminal block of the dryer.
Note which color is attached to which terminal ( red to red,black to black, white to white and green to green)...
3 Prong cables do not use a ground wire ( green) in the cord so you would wire the red to red, black to black and white to white ( The red and black are the power conductors and the white ..which is normally terminated between them.. is in the middle. You can get a seperate insulated conductor wire and route it from the ground stud of the dryer to the receptacle metal casing but do this with power disabled at the circuit breaker box...
Hope this helps.
Regards,
Rick

Nov 29, 2008 | Whirlpool LER5636P Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Trying to wire a 3 wire dryer from panel box to dryer plug


Sounds like you have a 10-2 NM wire. One black, one white, one bare copper. At panel box, black to one hot terminal of breaker or fuse holder (L1). White to other breaker terminal or other fuse holder (L2). Bare copper to the grounded neutral buss bar.
At the dryer the bare neutral goes to the center terminal, the other two go one each on either side, it won't matter which way. Hot Neutral Hot. The neutral terminal of the dryer should have a wire or metal strap connecting it to the dryer frame if you are not using a four wire supply.

Oct 22, 2008 | Dryers

1 Answer

Hooking an electrical dryer to a breaker


You will typically need a 40 amp 220V circuit for this ( check with local building inspectors).  You will need to run some hefty wire probably #8 three wire  (again check) and install the type of plug receptacle that is on the  dryer cord.

Inside the breaker box you will need a dual breaker 220V breaker rated at 40 amps.  The wire coming into the breaker box will need to be clamped in place with appropriately sized wire cable clamp where the enter the box through a knockout- available at any hardware store.

 

Now the big question-  why are you switching to electrical?  Gas is pretty much half as expensive as electricy  and will dry the clothes faster (usually gas dryers generate more heat than electrical ones).   Just wondering..

Oct 20, 2007 | Dryers

Not finding what you are looking for?
Whirlpool LER5636P Electric Dryer Logo

Related Topics:

69 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Whirlpool Dryers Experts

Dan Webster
Dan Webster

Level 3 Expert

8205 Answers

Tim Whalen

Level 3 Expert

3069 Answers

Richard Roth
Richard Roth

Level 3 Expert

9472 Answers

Are you a Whirlpool Dryer Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...