Question about Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm Lens

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Shutter priority shooting

In shutter priority setting I cannot get the shutter speed above 30 using the command dial and even when trying to shoot at 1/30 it shutter locks open. Been through the guide, played with different flash settings, etc. but cannot figure out what I am doing wrong. Please help.

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Gigi215, Change your ISO up until the speed is at least 1/60th, then see if that helps. randy320sgi

Posted on Jan 02, 2009

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What setting is for sports


That depends on the sport, the location, and what you want the pictures to say to the viewer. You won't necessarily shoot a daytime football game outdoors the same way as a basketball game indoors.

In general you're going to want a fast shutter speed to freeze the action. To get the fastest shutter speed possible, use the Aperture Priority mode by turning the mode dial to "A" then select the largest aperture by using cursor-up/down to get the smallest f/number.

Having said that, sometimes you might want a slower shutter speed to convey a sense of motion. Select Shutter Priority by turning the mode dial to "S" and use cursor-up/down to select the desired shutter speed.

Feb 03, 2014 | FUJIFILM FinePix S4000 / S4050 Digital...

1 Answer

How doI set up f11 on this camera


Do you mean set the aperture at f/11?

If you want the camera to set the shutter speed for proper exposure, turn the mode dial to the A position for Aperture Priority. Press the +/- button to display the shutter speed and aperture. Press cursor-up/down to change the aperture and the camera will change the shutter speed to give the proper exposure.

If you want to set the shutter speed and aperture yourself, turn the mode dial to M for Manual. Press the +/- button. Press cursor-up/down to set the shutter speed, cursor-left/right to set the aperture.

Full details are in the Shooting Mode section of the manual.

Nov 17, 2013 | Fujifilm FinePix S4250 Black 16MP Digital...

1 Answer

How to change the shutter speed on my nikon n65 film 35mm slr camera


In the manual and shutter-priority modes (set the dial to "M" or "S"), turn the command dial to change the shutter speed. In the aperture-priority mode (set the dial to "A"), turning the command dial changes the aperture and the camera will set the shutter speed appropriately.

If you need a manual, you may download a copy from here.

Oct 13, 2012 | Nikon N65 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

How to adjest shutter speed of nikon p90


In the P, S, and M modes, turn the command dial on the back of the camera. In the A mode, turning the command dial changes the aperture and the camera will change the shutter speed to compensate.
In the point&shoot modes the camera will set the shutter speed on its own.

Apr 27, 2012 | Nikon COOLPIX P90 Digital Camera

2 Answers

I bought this lense and need instant help. I am shooting pics at a high school football game and it gets dark early. What settings do I switch my camera to in order to get sufficient light and capture all...


Shooting sports and the evening can be a compromise between needed s fast shutter to stop action or a longer shutter to allow enough light for a good exposure. Fortunately, you've got a "fast" lens. My suggestions are:

Shoot in "A" mode (aperture priority) and change the aperture of the lens to the lowest number available to make the aperture open to maximum, and increase the ISO to 400 or 800. You may even get satisfactory results at ISO1600, but you should check the results on a computer screen before blindly going out shooting at the level.

By increasing the aperture, two things happen; exposure times are reduced to minimum so that motion is stopped (or blur minimized) and the the depth of field becomes very narrow or "shallow". Depth of field or "DOF" describes the distance in front and beyond the point of focus that will also be in focus. Large apertures (low "f" number s like 1.4 to 2.8 ) = narrow DOF and small apertures (high "f" numbers like 16 to 22 and beyond) = wide DOF. An example would be if you took a picture of someone's face from a2 feet away at f 1.4 and focused on the tip of the nose - the eyes would begin to get soft or out of focus - the ears would be even more noticeable - and that background would very blurred. The same picture at f 22 nearly everything would be in focus - except for maybe the background - depending how far behind it is from the subject's head. Check the example below:

steve_con_4.jpeg
Look at the backgrounds of the pictures above. The left is largely in focus at f 8 while the right is blurry at f 2.5. Had left been shot at f 22 or more, more of the background would be in focus.


Increasing the ISO to 400 or 800 increases the camera's sensitivity to light like film. The higher the ISO, the less time it takes to get a properly exposed picture. High ISO are helpful in low light situations or other times you need to have a faster shutter speed (for sports or don't have a tripod for pictures that need long exposures). Assume you want to take a picture of something that the camera tells you won't be exposed correctly unless you shoot at say for example f 2.8 and shutter is 1/30 second. If the camera ISO was set to 100, you could change it to 200. This doubles the sensitivity to light - meaning you need 1/2 the light; you can change the f number from f 2.8 to f 4, OR, leave it at 2.8 and increase the shutter speed to the next faster value 1/60 sec. If you change the ISO to 400, it is now 4x's sensitive than 100 (or 2x's than 200). At ISO 400, you could go two f stops smaller to f 5.6 or stay at 2.8 and increase shutter from 1/30 to 1/125. For ISO 800, you could go three f stops smaller to f 8 or stay at 2.8 and increase shutter from 1/30 to 1/250. You can mix and match, too. Go one up on the speed and two smaller on the aperture. The drawback to higher ISOs is that the pictures become grainier with each increase. Eventually, the pictures don't look good when you get into ISO numbers above 800 (or less on some DSLR cameras - and even less on point and shoot types). You have to experiment to find where your preferences are. See below for Low and High ISO comparison shots:

steve_con_86.jpg
The left picture above has nice, smooth transitions between shades of colors - the right picture has a grainy appearance called "noise". Some is acceptable but others are not - it depends what YOU can live with. Sometimes it's better to have a grainy shot than nothing at all.

Lastly, you can shoot "S" for shutter mode, to control motion instead of "A" which controls volume of light instead. The same principles apply.

I hope this helps & good luck!

Sep 08, 2011 | Tamron SP AF 70200mm f28 Di LD IF Makro...

1 Answer

Shutter speed actomatic change


If you move from mode to mode, the camera will remember the settings from the last time you were in that mode and reset to them. This is handy if you are in shutter priority shooting sports at a high shutter speed, and then want to take a picture of something that's not moving fast, like the crowd. You just pop it into aperature priority with a remembered settings of a higher f stop.

I use this to shoot the scoreboard, which has a fairly slow refresh rate and usually comes up blank if I shoot it at a shutter speed higher than about 1/100.

Sep 02, 2009 | Nikon D300 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

How can I change the exposures, or f-stops on the Nikon N75 35mm camera?


That depends on the exposure mode. In the point&shoot modes the camera sets the exposure.

In P you can turn the command dial to change the exposure.

In S you turn the command dial to set the shutter speed, the camera changes the aperture to suit.

In A you turn the command dial to set the aperture, the camera changes the shutter speed to suit.

In M you turn the command dial to set the shutter speed, you hold down the aperture button and turn the command dial to set the aperture.


If you don't have a manual, get one from http://www.butkus.org/chinon/nikon.htm

Oct 16, 2008 | Nikon Cameras

1 Answer

Photos have streaks


Sounds like you are shooting at shutter speeds of 1/30th of a second or slower, and/or your flash unit is set to "slow sync" or a similar mode. Try shooting in shutter priority or manual, and using a speed of at least 1/60th but not more than F4's sync speed of 1/250th. If you are shooting a moving subject, you may find that this "problem" actually creates some very interesting effects.

Sep 24, 2008 | Nikon F4s 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Panasonic DMC FZ30 shutter speed adjustment


set to s -then adjust using command wheel by thumb- 8 secs to 1/2000

Jan 20, 2008 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ30 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Shutter speed Panasonic DMC FZ30


set dial to s-then adjust to desired setting using command wheel by thumb.

Jan 20, 2008 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ30 Digital Camera

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