Question about Minolta Maxxum 7000 35mm SLR Camera

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F stop settings not responding

This is how I found out, I been taking a photography class, one of the assigments is to shoot 2 subjects as follow:
changing f stop and shutter speed

5 frames of each
#1 frame with correct meter reading and the other 4 frame only changing f stop, one and two stops over and one and two under.

The same way with shutter speed
#1 frame with correct meter reading and the other 4 frame only changing the shutter speed, one and two stops over and one and two under.

I shoot 2 rolls and made contact sheets to see the diferent dark from the
F stops and shutter speeds. I noticed the frames with different f stop stayed the same, nothing was different while the other frames that I change the shutter speed was succcesfull.
I had no idea was the problem, Please advice
Thanks

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It could be that the camera's aperture stop-down magnets have failed, causing the camera to shoot everything fully stopped-down (e.g. all shots at F22 or F16). There doesn't appear to be a cure for this (at least not one that makes financial sense). Change the shutter speed over a range, then look into the lens - does it stop down fully every time? Try changing the f-stop - does it still stop down fully every time (the iris goes very small - same size on every shot)?
If yes, it's the magnets. If you've invested a lot in lenses, try a Sony digital SLR - your lenses will work with that, or pick up another Minolta film body - perhaps something substantially newer, where the aperture magnets haven't had a chance to fail.

Posted on Oct 20, 2008

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Try it on bulb, and open the f and check it is working properly the problem might be the computer inside the camera and there's no replacement spare parts, but yoou canfind another ody and swap the computer.

Posted on Oct 12, 2008

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How do i take indoor actions shots with the rebel xs


Indoor actions shots are tough to take because of dim lighting and fast moving subjects. With the right settings and equipment, it can increase your chances of getting that perfect shot.

The Perfect Camera Settings for Action and Sports Photography

Feb 06, 2013 | Canon EOS Rebel XS 35mm SLR Camera

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What is the fastest write speed? I have noticed the camera does take a while to write when shooting several rapid succession in raw mode. I am shopping for a better SD card. Is it worth it to pay the extra...


Although a good SD card is worth considering it's not the only thing that determines the speed. In fact the shooting light has more to do with it then the memory card. The Rebels although not Pro cameras are pretty darn fast with the differences immeasurable in most cases with Pro cameras.
The Rebel will show the burst rate in the right corner of the viewfinder and if you noticed this rate changes with the light and shutter speeds. Sow the shutter speed down and that burst rate will drop as well. The size of the image file also dictates how fast you can burst in frames per second. You are shooting RAW and no doubt jpg's so the camera is doing double duty with some pretty impressive files size. If you want speed shoot jpg's and set your camera correctly for white balance, shoot for the end use. If you are looking for speed you aren't shooting portraits or landscapes where you have time to calculate your shot so the need for a BIG print isn't necessary so drop your image quality.
The Rebel's processor is very impressive and it has a large buffer where it writes the file as you are shooting so in fact the camera is writing to the buffer at the same time it's writing to the memory card. That's why when you stop shooting it takes several seconds for the camera to catch up.

If you are looking for speed keep your shutter speed up, reduce the image file size, shoot jpg, class 6 works nice (I use this type) I have only one class 8.

On a personal note the Canon Digital Rebel has put so much power and performance in the hands of entry level photographers and they are using that power to come up with some darn nice photography and in the right hands it's putting the hurt to some long time pro shooters.

Jan 02, 2011 | Canon EOS Rebel XS 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I have trouble taking indoor (low light) photos. pictures come out blury and the camera does not snap the picture properly i have a nikon 35 mm n6006 camera


Hi Rebecca--
The hardest thing about low light photography is balancing your available shutter speed to the amount of action you're trying to capture.
Here are a few things to try:
1) Try using a tripod. Steadying your camera during long exposures will greatly improve your image clarity.
2) Buy a faster film. You may need to increase your film's ISO setting. Try 400 to start, then go up from there. Remember, faster film always produces grainy images, and it usually costs a little more to process. If you're stuck with 100 ISO, you can always "push process" the film, where a given ISO is let to sit in its developer longer than usual--This will cost you more too!
3) Invest in a good flash system. Nikon has tons of hotshoe flash systems that rarely compromise the ambient light-mood of a given situation. Look for one that lets you aim the flash in different directions, and try to find one that will meter a light situation on its own.
4) Turn on the lights. If you're ok with losing some of the romance of an image, turn on some more lights to give you some more flexibility when making your exposure choices.
5) Open up your aperture. You may find that a lot less in depth of field will give you a lot more in image clarity and exposure flexibility. Shooting at f2.8 with only a birthday cake lighting your subject will grant you many more valuable shutter stops that shooting the same with f5.6.
Remember, Rebecca, if you're shooting handheld, you must do everything in your power to shoot with the quickest shutter speed available. This will cut down on the blurriness of your indoor images.
--Hope this helps.

Oct 06, 2010 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Underexposure problem maybe? please help!


Your camera probably needs a new battery.
The light meter needs sufficient power (5.5v to 6v) to work correctly.

Your ISO could have moved, even a double or halving of it will over/underxpose a full stop.

Nov 10, 2009 | Canon EOS-AE-1 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Photography Class Camera


Hello, depending on the class he is taking you may find that a normal digital camera will suffice. Most camera classes and courses now use digital, unfortunately the old film cameras are becoming a thing of the past. If your son is a mad keen photographer then I would consider investing in his future and buy him a good quality digital SLR. I hope this is somewhat helpful.

Nov 04, 2009 | Minolta Maxxum 5000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Help setting shutter speed and adjusting a lense properly


Hey little22,
I would set this camera to auto mode to begin with. This cameras auto mode is actually an aperture priority mode which means you choose the aperture on the lens and the camera automatically chooses the correct shutter speed. For outside photography the morning hours and the evening hours will provide the best light because the light is softer and the subject will not be lit from above which usually cast unwanted shadows on your subject. If you do have to shoot during mid day I would put an external flash on your camera to fill in the shadow areas on the subject. Inside photography is often more challenging because even though the human eye can adjust to low light levels camera film is not so forgiving. You will either need to shoot with a very high ISO film, or you will need to use a flash. I would suggest using a flash since high ISO film is usually very grainy. If you can I would suggest bouncing the flash off of a white surface this should produce softer light and more pleasing portraits. I have included a link to a download of your camera manual incase you need it. If you have any other more specific questions just ask. I hope this helps!

http://ca.konicaminolta.com/support/manuals/film-cameras/film_mf_slr/index.html

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.


Jun 21, 2008 | Minolta X-370S 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

You answer to my resent problem on night shots...


Hey matty reps,
Aperture priority is a setting on most SLR cameras where you choose the aperture, which is the size of the opening in the lens that lets light thru, and the camera chooses a shutter speed that provides a correct exposure. The smaller the opening in the lens the less light that gets thru to expose the film so the shutter has to stay open longer to provide a correct exposure, but the smaller the aperture you use the larger the depth of field. Depth of field is how far in front and behind the subject things are in sharp focus. Canon refers to aperture priority as Av mode. With flash photography the camera usually sets the shutter speed to a designated speed called xsync speed, which is probably 1/90th of a second since this is what you said the camera was setting it to, but that speed is irrelevant since the duration of the flash is what determines the exposure time with flash photography which is usually around 1/10000 of a second (easily fast enough to stop almost any action). In aperture priority with a flash the smaller the aperture you use the more that will be in focus but more light will be needed from the flash and the closer you will need to be to your subject. A hotshoe mounted flash will help tremendously. I hope I didn't confuse you more, but as I said before you are attempting something difficult to do in photography. Keep trying and you'll get it!

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

May 29, 2008 | Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Night shots


Hey matty reps,
You are attempting one of the most challenging types of photography there is, because you are combing nighttime photography and action photography. If you want to stop the action you normally would be using the highest shutter speed possible, but since you are trying to take nighttime action photographs I would rely on a flash since the flash duration in essence becomes your shutter speed. I would definitely use a hotshoe mounted flash because the built in flash will most likely not be powerful enough for your needs. I would have the camera set to aperture priority so I could control the depth of field, because the smaller the aperture the larger depth of field you will have and the less likely your subject will be out of focus. If you are attempting natural light nighttime action photography you will definitely need a very fast film speed such as 3200 speed film which will provide significant loss of image quality. You will also need a very fast lens meaning a lens with an aperture of at least f2.8 or larger, and your camera in this scenario should be set to shutter priority so you can set the camera to the fastest shutter speed possible but this will present focusing issues. In both scenarios I would have the AF system set to continuous so the camera doesn't require you to achieve focus to be able to trip the shutter. As in all challenging photography situations more photos are better than less, because you should have more failed photos than successful. I hope this helps!

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

May 28, 2008 | Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Blurry pictures in Sports Mode


Well, Sports Mode is a fully automated mode, which I believe tries to balance the exposure toward faster shutter speeds. An over all dark photo indicates an underexposure. You can adjust for underexposure by dialing in a 1/2 stop or so on your exposure compensation dial.

However, dark AND blurry indicates that you just didn't have enough light. The first thing you want, for that same shooting situation, is some faster film. Go up at least an f-stop or two (eg, if you're shooting with ISO 100 film, try ISO 400).

Pay attention to the shutter speed the camera is setting. If you're stilling still, photographing action, you'll want a pretty fast shutter speed, or you WILL get blurring. I'd recommend at least 1/250th second, faster still if you're trying to freeze motion.

A more advanced technique is to pan with your subject. Follow the subject with the camera, and use a medium to medium fast shutter speed (1/60th-1/250th). You will get some blurring, but if you learn this well, your subject will be pretty clear, and the background will blur... thus including the suggestion of speed in the final photo, rather than something that looks frozen. That can deliver a much more satisfying shot.

I have used Canons for years, but I avoid all of the those special modes, like sports modes. They're really trying to deliver some help, but these are techniques you should learn in any basic photography course.

If you set the camera to Av mode, you can choose the widest aperture available for that lens, which will always get you the fastest possible shutter speed -- thus, the least chance of blurring. If you still blur, you need more light, a lower f-stop number, or faster film.. those are the only cures.

Nov 29, 2007 | Canon EOS Rebel Ti / 300V 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

How and when to use the flash


When you take a shot slower than 1/20, the shutter takes longer to close. This means while it is open, it will record everything. The best way to correct this is not the flash really. Try putting it on a tripod. This way you can lower your shutter speed without sacrificing crisp pictures. Also, with a built in flash, you get a very shallow lit area. If your subject is far from the camera, the flash won't do much good. When this happens, the only thing to do is get a stronger mounted flash or slow your shutter down and open up your aperture. Hope this helps. Keep me posted. Photography is a never ending learning process.

Oct 15, 2007 | Canon EOS Rebel Ti / 300V 35mm SLR Camera

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