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House lamp switch on cord not connecting

Hello, I a number of desk top lamps in my house where the switch is part of the cord. The majority of the lamps flicker like crazy when I turn them on and often I jingle the cord so I can get a connection. Can you help.

Jenny


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I have never been a big fan of these type switchs for this very reason. This type of "in line" switch usually has two halves, that fit over the cord. It could be that the screw that holds the two halves together could be loose. If this connection is tight, then, depending on what type of switch this is (there are several types), it might or might not could be repaired. THEREFORE, I would suggest a trip to the hardware store or department store, and buy a new switch (Wal Mart carries 2 types of these type switches). The instructions will be included with the switch, and it is easy enough for most homeowners to easily repair, most of the time with only a screwdriver. And as long as you have the lamp unplugged when you repair it (PLEASE!), there is no harm of being electrocuted.

I hope some of this helps!!
Chad

Posted on Oct 08, 2008

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These in-line switches are also very unfavourable for me also......as chad7houston mentions above...some are screwed together but there are also the ones that simply pinch the wires throught the insulation and the 2 halves snap together without any screws......these switches arc and deteriorate every time you switch them and they get worse each time......it's best to replace the entire cord with a new switch because the cords used with those lamps are also not very good....good luck

Posted on Jun 28, 2010

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LEVITON 7090-BR LAMPHOLDER 3 TERMINALS


I need to ask you for a bit more information. Ordinarily a socket for a 3-way lamp has two external connections, one of which goes to power (black is the standard color) and one which connects to the neutral wire (white is the standard color). The other wire commonly encountered in house wiring is green, which is a ground connection. Lamps normally do not use a ground. The Levitron web page does not flag this socket to be anything out of the ordinary, but neither do they show the connections.

So please provide any additional information that you can on this socket. Is it meant to hold a single, 3-way incandescent bulb, or is it for a florescent bulb? Is it meant for a special purpose?

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Hello, I currently have a celing lamp in my kitchen. There is a little cord you pull to turn it off. The onlything is, is that the cord is not working and i dont know how to turn my lamp off if not to...


The lamp has on-off pull-chain switch.
You can buy replacement pull-chain switch at hardware store.
Buy the pull-chain switch that has two wires.
Buy two yellow or orange wire nuts.

Switch off breaker.
Take apart light.
Remove old pull-chain. Strip back the wires if needed, twist wires together.
Connect new pull-chain switch using wire nuts.

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What is through cord switch?


A feed thru cord switch is a switch that the cord is fed thru during installation. Basically the switch is opened by first removing the two machine screws and their tiny nuts. The two halves will separate, exposing grooves and metal teeth which are designed to puncture the insulation of the wire, usually two conductor lamp cord, after the cord is inserted into one half and the other half is replaced and tightened. This type of switch is commonly used to install an in line on-off switch for a lamp or fan. Hope this helps. Dano

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1 Answer

Push button desk lamp switch --the button broke off


Add in-line switch to cord, available at home center.
http://www.uniteduniversal.com/images/product/000_0143.jpg

Or put lamp on a remote control
Example of remote control that I use:
http://www.amazon.com/Woods-13568-Wireless-Control-3-Outlet/dp/B001Q9EFUU
http://waterheatertimer.org/Woods-timers-and-manuals.html#13568

Add a comment with your experience so others with same-similar problem can benefit.

Also take advantage of fixya expert assistance live.
For a price, expert works with you while you work on lamp or any do-it-yourself project.
Fixya is always less expensive than a service call.

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I need a diagram to install a Westinghouse 3-way light switch (#77052) on a lighting fixture on the bottom of a ceiling fan. I did not do the removal of the light fixture so I don't know how it was wired...


If by a 3-way switch, you mean a switch with 4 steps of brilliance: off, low, medium, and high when used with a 3-way bulb. The black wire of the switch is connected to incoming power wiring hot wire. Most often also black. The red switch wire connects to the center contact of the lamp socket. The blue wire connects to the small pin connection that is physically between the center connection and the screw shell of the lamp socket. The screw shell is connected to the incoming white wire of the house wiring.

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I removed a feed-through Leviton rotary switch from a fan cord so I could remove the grille. I didn't see how it was wired. How do I get it back on properly?


These types of switches use what's called an IDC (Insulation Displacement Connector) which consist of a set of sharp edges teeth, that look somewhat like a 2 bladed fork, staggered inside the hard plastic switch body.

Make sure you unplug the fan before attempting any repair!

When you join the two (2) halves of the connector, and screw together the switch body over the lamp cord, those forks/teeth will pierce the insulation and go around the two internal copper conductors inside the zip cord and make an electrical connection.

You should try to get the connector placed very close to where it was before, as the cord has been compromised by having this type of connector installed on it and as such, really should have the entire cord replaced from a safety standpoint IF you can't get it back on the proper location.

You should be able to see where the connector was by simply looking at the wire cord and by matching up each side of the switch body with the indents left on the lamp cord. (there are only two possible ways it can go).

Push in on and tighten the screw and you should be fine. Try it after you're done and if you have any issues (sparks, not working easily or correctly), just get some new lamp cord and rewire the fan and put on a new rotary switch, as they're only about $1.50 +/- brand new.

Hope you find this Very Helpful and best regards!

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1 Answer

The 911 flashing light on our lamp post does not work?


wow that seam's like a good one, you may need a 3 way bulb in the lamp post? thats the only thing i can think of without looking at it.

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1 Answer

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From one side of the lamp cord, to one side of the switch.

From other side of switch to both blacks from the upper and lower bulbs.

From other side of lamp cord, to the white coming from both bulbs.

This assumes there is a black and white wire coming from both bulbs.

Please note, look at the lamp cord closely, particularly the plug. If one prong is wider than the other, then the plug is polarized, and you need to pay special attention to the wires leading out of the plug. One of the two will be ribbed, the other smooth. Note which is on the same side of the plug as the wide prong. Whichever is with the wide prong, should NOT connect to the switch, but to the whites coming from the bulbs.

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Want to install Fan and light control from one switch.


'define control'

anyway, that all the lights work together makes it simpler

most fanlights, updated by homeowners replace a lamp only unit, with on/off provided at the switch, and cable pulls on the unit to change speed direction of the fan

my favorite is paired dimmer switches, giving control separately of light and fan speed, fan direction still changes on the pull switch, requires 3 wires in the switch box, (power and 2 switched lines), to the lamp connector and fan motor connector, any sparky can pull the extra line with fishtape along the existing cable run. easy peasey.
Really good electricians pull three wire to light circuits, when the house is built or reno-ed. but you know how oftern that is gonna happen, 3 wire costs 3c more per foot, if there is 3 wire in the switch box -your home and hosed

or just for speed/dimmer control a dimmer switch can replace the existing single switch. but you still have to pull the cords to start the fans

its easy, with the caveat that you may kill yourself, or someone else, or burn the house down, if you dont do it right

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