Question about Gateway 19" Flat Panel LCD Monitor

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Fpd1960uk works for short time then goes off

I read somewhere on internet many problems down to bad electrolytic capacitors in power supply I replaced these and it worked for a couple of days fine then it stopped again now light comes up blue then after a few seconds it goes out

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If you can change some of the SMD capacitors especially the very light sandy coloured ones as they have a reputation for being very fragile as well no matter what size the package they come in. Hope this helps.

Posted on Sep 28, 2008

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I have TV Seiki model SE50FY28 when we turn on the TV, it works for a minute then the screen goes black, we still have audio and the flashlight test shows a faint image, what may the problem be?


Probably the back light inverter is faulty . Before going to buy a new inverter board tey to check the power supply. Which the bellow added video to know how to check a power supply board. You have to check the 24V power sto the inverter board from the power supply. if its not there then the problem is with power board. If its ok then you have to go for a new inverter board. Also try to replace the electrolytic capacitors in the power supply board. some times bad electrolytic capacitors can lead to back light failure.
www.electro-medical.blogspot.com
Testing LCD TV Power Supply BoardsSTEP BY STEP

Oct 31, 2015 | Seiki Televison & Video

1 Answer

My emachine T3120 will not start up


To me from the indications given it looks like a Power Supply problem.
At first LED lights light, and fans spin.
Then you plug a PCI Express card in, and NO fans spin.

PCI Express graphics card took all the power there was available.

[ A PCI Express x16 slot can deliver Up To 75 Watts ]

1) If ALL of the LED lights were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

3) A typical Processor can use 51 to 125 Watts of power.
Just depends on what Processor it is.

You don't have enough power to turn the Processor on.
Fans were spinning, you plugged a graphics card in, fans do not spin now.

Power Supply has a weak voltage power rail.
(There are three; 3.3 Volt, 5 Volt, and 12 Volt)

HOWEVER, the method is to diagnose; not parts changing.
Do you have a multimeter to test the three voltage power rails?
I can guide you. An economical multimeter ranges about $5 to $12 around here.

No?
How about a KNOWN to be good, Compatible power supply; that you could borrow from a working computer, for a test unit?

How could a Power Supply go bad from just sitting?
There are Electrolytic Capacitors inside the Power Supply. These have a chemical paste inside. Electrolytic Paste. The paste breaks down over time. Especially if the Power Supply is not plugged into power.
(When an SMPS (Power Supply) is plugged into power, there is a constant 5 Volts present. (5 Volts DC) This is the 5 Volt Standby power )

[The Electrolytic Capacitors used are Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors ]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrolytic_capacitor

Click on the second photo down on the right. The Bottom example is a Radial design. The example is actually a Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitor.


Just so I do not miss anything in the diagnoses, I would also like you to look CLOSE at the Electrolytic Capacitors on the motherboard, too,

http://capacitorlab.com/visible-failures/index.htm

Long 'story', I'll try to make it short;
General Electrolytic Capacitor construction,

1) Case: The outside case is an aluminum cylindrical shell.
Think of a 'Coca-Cola' can with the top and bottom open.

2) The top 'lid' is a thin aluminum flat disk.
It has either a lK or X shape cut into the flat disk, partway
It is sealed around it's outer edge to the Case.
This is the Vent Cover.

3) The bottom 'lid' is a synthetic rubber flat disk.
It is called the Bung.

4) Inside are three strips. (There are many layers of these strips in actuality)

A) One strip is metal, and is the Conducting Strip.
It has the Positive lead connected to it. (Lead; Think stiff wire)

B) One strip is also metal, but has a non-conducting medium applied to it. It is the Non-Conducting strip, and the Negative lead connects to it.

C) The last strip is paper-like, and soaked with Electrolytic Paste.
The Electrolytic Paste soaked strip is laid in-between the two metal strips, and all three are rolled up tightly.
The two leads (Positive and Negative) poke down through the Bung.

(Again, there are several layers of this construction, inside the capacitor's case)

When an Electrolytic capacitor goes bad, the Electrolytic paste inside chemically breaks down. It either dries up, or turns into a gas.
Hydrogen Gas.
The gas expands inside the Case, and pushes against the top seal, (Vent Cover), and bottom seal. (Bung)

The X or lK shape etched partway into the Vent Cover pops open, and/or one side of the synthetic rubber Bung pushes down.
The gas begins pushing Electrolytic paste out.

So much paste loss, and the capacitor can operate at a weakened state.
Too much paste loos, and the capacitor fails.
This is why it can work sometimes, then seem to fail all at once.

This applies to Electrolytic capacitors on the motherboard, and in the Power Supply.

[NOT an invite to open the Power Supply, and attempt a repair!
This = No.
Replace ]

The first thing to do when diagnosing a desktop computer problem, is make SURE it is receiving power, and the correct amount of voltage.

THEN the diagnosis can be continued on.
A Power Supply with a weak voltage power rail, cam emulate all sorts of seemingly software problems.

http://www.fic.com.tw/product/motherboard/AMD/K8MC51G.aspx

For additional questions please post in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Nov 11, 2012 | eMachines T3120 Motherboard Replacement...

1 Answer

Computer does not want to stay on


Generally this means a bad Power Supply, or bad Electrolytic Capacitors on the motherboard.

I wish I knew what exact eMachines model number, you were referring to.
Because I do not, this solution will be generic.

Looking at the back of the computer tower where the power cord plugs in, this is the Power Supply.
(Rectangular in shape metal case, has it's own fan)

eMachines are a budget computer. Designed to save the consumer money, while trying to provide a medium design of personal computer.

However, in saving the consumer money, there are less than quality parts used.
The Power Supply is one of them.

(IF I had the model number from the back of the computer tower, next to the Windows product key, or up on the side of the tower, I could give you exact Power Supply replacement options, and guide you in replacing)

One of the main electronic components that break down in a Power Supply, are Electrolytic Capacitors.
They are the 'weakest link'.

The type of Power Supply used in a personal computer is an SMPS.
Switched-Mode Power Supply,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

Click on the photo to the upper right.
The two round blue circles are Electrolytic Capacitors. This is a top view. The blue circle is the top edge of a plastic sleeve, which goes around the capacitor's body.

The letter E also points out more Electrolytic Capacitors.
Top view.
(The ones in B are Input Stage capacitors. They filter the incoming AC electricity. The ones marked by the letter E are Output Stage capacitors. They filter the outgoing DC electricity )

This is a side view of an Electrolytic Capacitor. (Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitor, to be more exact),

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Capacitors_electrolytic.jpg

The one at the bottom with the light blue sleeve, and 160V, and 10uf, on it. It is a Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitor)

This is not an invite to replace these components. The preferred method is to replace the Power Supply.
(A good capacitor can hold a charge for weeks, months, sometimes over a year. The charge can be released to YOU, if the capacitors are not Properly discharged first)

Bad Electrolytic Capacitors on the motherboard. (Again, these are also Radial Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors )

http://www.capacitorlab.com/visible-failures/index.htm

Part of what Electrolytic Capacitors do on the motherboard, (In referring to the motherboard's capacitors in your eMachines), is to regulate voltage.
This is the Motherboard Voltage Regulator Circuit.

Part of what the MVRC does, is to regulate voltage for the Processor.
The Processor MUST have a steady, clean, supply of voltage, and it MUST be within the voltage range for the Processor.

Can't be too much, or too little.

The capacitors that make up the part of the motherboard voltage regulator circuit, that handles voltage for the Processor, are in a Series circuit. Just like Christmas tree lights. If one capacitor goes bad, none of the rest will work.

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/616

A short video (Not made by me) showing what happens when Electrolytic Capacitors are bad on the motherboard. (These 'caps' also are in the motherboard voltage regulator circuit, that handles the voltage for the Processor),

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KN6_-8fYHo0

(Starts at 0:04)

Replacing 'caps',

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCSNWi3UHf4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaKobAKmYA4&feature=related

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette


Dec 11, 2011 | E-Machines eMachines Desktop PC

2 Answers

Pc automatically restart of many time


Test your PSU or replace it if your power supply units fan is not working your PSU is faulty

One bad lead can cause a computer to continue on a cycle or to shutdown

Test all leads that attach to your hard drive including electrical extensions,IDE,SATA and

the leads from your motherboard to your hard drive make sure they have a secure connection and are not faulty or just replace them there probably old and faulty
problems
make sure all leads that are attached to your drives dvd\cd 3 1/2 inch floppy have secure connections and are not faulty or just replace them they are probably old and faulty ?
hope this helps

Dec 01, 2010 | Mercury Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Fujitsu siemens scaleo 600 desktop just keeps shutting down any ideas


1) Bad Power Supply. Power Supply has a weak voltage power rail.

Electrolytic Capacitors are breaking down inside the Power Supply.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

The capacitors build up a charge long enough to work briefly, then break down.

2) Electrolytic Capacitors on the motherboard are breaking down. Specifically the one's used in the motherboard Voltage Regulator Circuit.

A) http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/616

B) Visually identifying bad capacitors,

http://www.capacitorlab.com/visible-failures/index.htm

C) Video showing what happens with bad capacitors (Electrolytic) in the motherboard Voltage Regulator Circuit (Starts at 0:04)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KN6_-8fYHo0

Await your further diagnoses.

May 23, 2010 | Fujitsu Siemens SCALEO 600 (FSP:83C005617)...

3 Answers

12v reads 7v --5v reads 3v. This to me is not normal. The test was done with MB hooked up cause that was the only way turn on the supply. Is it the supply or MB that is the problem ?


It's the power supply.

Why?

Because it's made with cheap components for one.
The gauge of the wiring inside is too small.
The Electrolytic Capacitors are cheap. Have a bad formula for the Electrolytic paste inside.
The Rectifier Bridge is inferior.
I could go on, and on.

What has transpired is that one or more Electrolytic Capacitors inside have failed, or are failing.
This makes a weak voltage rail.

Electrolytic Capacitors inside a personal computer power supply are Filters. They are used to filter the incoming AC voltage in the Input stage, and the rectified, (DC) voltage in the Output stage.

An Electrolytic Capacitor resembles a small aluminum can. It has two leads coming out of the bottom. (The ones used for personal computers, that is)

Inside the Electrolytic Capacitor are three layers.

One layer of a strip of thin metal.
This is the Conducting strip, or Positive strip. Connects to the Positive lead. (Only the Negative lead is marked)

One layer of thin metal with a non-conductive coating applied to it.
This is the Non-conducting strip, or Negative strip. Connects to the Negative lead.

There is a strip of paper which is soaked in Electrolytic paste.
The strip of paper is laid in-between the conducting strip, and the non-conducting strip, then the all three layers are rolled up, and inserted into the 'Can'.

When an Electrolytic Capacitor goes bad, the paste forms a gas. Hydrogen Gas. This gas in turn creates pressure, and compromises the seals of the Can.

There is a rubber round seal on the bottom. There is a seal on top. The top of the 'Can' has a notch etched in it. Common shapes are an X or lK.

When too much pressure develops inside, the seal is pushed out of the bottom, (Slightly), and/or the notch on top of the Can splits open. In time Electrolytic paste oozes out.

So much paste loss, and the capacitor operates at a lower capacitance. Too much paste loss, and the capacitor fails.
(Also after time Electrolytic paste breaks down. Chemical reaction breaks the paste down. Designers are aware of this, and incorporate capacitors that are 50 percent better than is needed)

This is NOT an invite to open your power supply!
Capacitors are designed to slowly build up a charge, then release it all at once!
They can hold a charge for weeks, sometimes months! (Sometimes longer than this)

Should you reach inside, and touch your fingertips to the two terminals of a capacitor, it can release it's charge to you!

Should you reach inside, and your fingertips complete a circuit, that one or more capacitors are in, it/they can release their charge to you!

The best way is to use a power supply that is KNOWN to be good, and connect it for a test.

Computer power supply's put out three voltages. Two you have observed.
A.3.3 Volts (Orange insulation on the wire)
B.5 Volts (Red insulation)
C.12 Volts (Yellow insulation)
(Newer computers are doing away with the 3.3 Voltage Rail. Your power supply still has the 3.3 voltage rail)

As long as you have the correct power supply cables, and connectors, plus the right amount needed, you could use ANY power supply that puts out 160 Watts.

PROBLEM IS, the size, and shape of your power supply. You need one that is that size, and shape.
It SHOULD fit inside. Sitting outside the computer is a bad safety factor.

Therefore, it is my suggestion that you buy the correct power supply to fit your computer.

Bad motherboard? Don't think so.
Why?
Because of the voltage readings you have.


Do you see any bad Electrolytic Capacitors on the motherboard? Any that show visual signs of failure? This is the first hardware indication of a bad motherboard.
This gives more information on the visual signs of capacitor failure,

http://www.capacitorlab.com/visible-failures/index.htm

Also keep the inside of your computer clean, and the power supply. Computer unplugged from power, use a can of compressed air for computers.
When the inside of a computer, and it's power supply are dirty, the power supply has to deliver more power.

Heat = Wasted Energy.
The processor fan, and heatsink are dirty? Then the processor heats up, and requires more power. (Eventually the thermal limit of the processor is reached, and BIOS turns the processor off. It's a Fail Safe feature built-in. Keeps the processor from burning up)

The inside of the power supply is dirty, and it's fan?
Inside the power supply are heatsinks. They resemble the heatsink used for the processor.
A Heatsink draws heat away from the object it is attached to. Then air is drawn over the heatsink fins,( that are radiating heat), and heat is pushed away by the air.

The fan for the power supply draws air. Draws air into the power supply though the computer case. Once the fan blades, it's center hub, and the outside cage around the fan, become coated with dust/dirt, the cooling capacity drops tremendously.

The power supply has to keep up with the energy that is being wasted, and puts out more power.
Eventually components inside the power supply fail. (Electrolytic Capacitors are Generally the first to go)
Again, heat = wasted energy

Nov 22, 2009 | IBM (24P6829) for NetVista M41 160-Watt...

1 Answer

The screen goes all white within 1 to 5 mins. of being turned on. kinda like my ex-girlfriend.


Inside this monitor is a power supply. The power supply converts the AC electricity you have, (120 volts or 220 volts. Depends on what country you're in), to the needed voltage for the monitor.

The power supply is going bad. This is why you can turn it off and back on, and it works for a few minutes.

More than likely it's Electrolytic Capacitors that are going bad, within the power supply itself.
These capacitors break down due to a variety of problems. The largest issue, is that they are cheap components, and have an inherent problem before they were installed.

Capacitor Plague.
Let me explain. A number of years ago a certain individual stole an Electrolytic Capacitor paste formula.

[To simplify the construction of an Electrolytic Capacitor, let me state they are small aluminum 'cans', and have Electrolytic paste inside. (Ones used for computer related capacitors)

For a more detailed explanation of Electrolytic Capacitor construction, I invite you to go to Wikipedia.org, and type -> Electrolytic Capacitor <- in their search bar. Look under the Construction heading]

Unknown to the thief they were given a bogus formula. This formula of Electrolytic paste developed a gas after time. (Hydrogen gas)

This gas expands in the capacitor, breaks a seal, and Electrolytic paste starts oozing out.
For a small amount of paste loss, the capacitor operates in a weakened state.
Such as what you're experiencing.
After so much paste loss, the capacitor fails.

There is more than one capacitor that is used, in that monitor power supply. Some are still good enough to get the monitor to power on, but can't sustain power, so they can't keep the monitor on.

I know this may be way more information than you wanted, or needed, but I thought I would explain exactly what is going on.

Solution? I suggest you replace the monitor. Opening a monitor is VERY dangerous. I Do Not advise trying to fix it.

Apr 15, 2009 | Mag Innovision LT765b 17" Flat Panel LCD...

1 Answer

Tv won't come on


Hello to all from Tom Arnold, WA6OVP

Subject: Repair of computer monitors or flat panel TV’s.

History:
Recently my wife's 27-inch AKAI (LCT21AS) 27-inch flat panel HDTV with DVD player quit working. Years ago, when I had an analog computer monitor quit operating; Joe Fadden WA6DDF had mentioned to me, that often computer monitor problems were caused by the monitor's power supply. Joe also said these power supply problems were often caused by failed electrolytic capacitors. Joe said he was able to fix many computer monitors by just changing all of the power supply electrolytic capacitors. Rather the fix that failed monitor, I just a bought a new one.


Symptoms:
The inoperative HDTV had been bought at COSTCO and had already been returned once to a COSTCO repair center for repairs. Cost to ship and insure the HDTV was 67 dollars. We received back a new HDTV set. Turn around time was over a month, with many long distance telephone calls being required. The new HDTV worked for about three months after it was received. When the returned HDTV failed, it trapped a DVD disc that had been left in the HDTV DVD player. The new HDTV failure symptoms were the same as the original HDTV failure. The red led indication would not change to green when the remotes power on button was pushed. There was no picture and no sound. The remote is required to operate the TV set.


Economics:
My wife's HDTV with internal DVD player was very expensive. Worse yet, the trapped DVD disc was the movie Flash Gorden Space Soldiers 1936. A local TV shop wanted 85 dollars to look at the failed HDTV; repairs were 75 dollars labor an hour plus parts. I quickly figured out that if I could fix the problem it would save a lot of time and money.


Internet Search:
I checked the Internet to determine if other AKAI owners had similar problems with their HDTV sets. There were lots of AKAI 27 inch and 32 inch HDTV set owners listing problems. Without exception all of the complaints concerned the HDTV power supply PC board and failed electrolytic capacitors.


General Internet Consensus:
Most of the AKAI HDTV sets worked just great and that many had been sold worldwide. There were some AKAI HDTV sets that did have power supply problems. Most of the AKAI HDTV set owners were not very pleased with either AKAI or the COSTCO response to the inoperative HDTV power supply problem.


Trouble Shooting:
All electrical power was removed from the HDTV set. The HDTV was placed face down on a workbench with a piece of cardboard to protect the display screen. The HDTV back panel cover was removed. There were many screws of several different sizes. The power supply PC board was separate from the rest of the set's components and was easily identified. The power supply PC board contained several different individual different voltage power supplies. Three electrolytic capacitors located on the PC board had obviously failed. The tops of these three capacitors were puffed out. Often when electrolytic capacitors fail they get over heated and the top of the capacitor is puffed out displaying an over pressurized appearance. The power supplies on the PC board were of the switching type. Switching type power supplies are also used in computer monitors to save money and weight.


Power Supply PC Board Removal:
The power supply PC board was mounted to the HDTV back panel with several screws. These screws were removed. There also several multi-pin connectors attached to the PC board. These connectors were numbered with a black felt marker to ensure correct reinstallation. The connectors were Hot-glued in place. A sharp knife was used to remove the hot glue. The connectors were removed.


Repair:
The three suspect failed capacitors were easily removed. The three capacitors were each 1000 ufd and rated at 16 working volts. The other power supply PC board electrolytic capacitors were visibly checked. Three new capacitors were installed, they were rated at 1000 ufd at 25 working volts. On the PC board the three electrolytic capacitors were in just one of the power supply circuits and were identified as EC18, EC19, and EC20.


The New Electrolytic capacitors:
These were low impedance / high reliability radial lead polarized aluminum capacitors, they have a plus and minus connection pins. Correct installation of any polarized capacitor is required. The three new electrolytic capacitors were specifically designed and rated for service in switching type power supply circuits. Switching type power supply electrolytic capacitors need to be both very robust and designed for use in high frequency circuits. General-purpose aluminum electrolytic capacitors should not be used in switching type power supplies, if capacitors designed for switching power supplies can be obtained.


Final Repair Steps:
The PC board was reinstalled without the electrical connectors to the PC board being hot glued. The HDTV back panel cover was refastened. Watched episodes one through five of Space Soldiers. It was well worth the time and three electrolytic capacitors to fix the problem. The repairs saved a lot of time and money. The repair was very simple and not the least challenging. It took longer to remove and then reinstall the HDTV back cover panel than it took to replace the three failed capacitors.



Safety:
These types of repairs should not be attempted without a complete understanding of the dangers involved with working on electrical equipment, especially working around power supplies and charged capacitors. Proper desoldiering and soldiering techniques need to be used.

Conclusions:
Flat screen computer monitors and TV sets do fail. Repairs of electronic equipment can be very expensive. When your computer monitor or flat screen TV does fail, you might consider a visible inspection of the equipments power supply. A simple repair might save you a lot of time and money.


Aug 12, 2008 | Akai LCT2785TA 27 in. LCD Television

1 Answer

TV won't work.


Hello to all from Tom Arnold, WA6OVP

Subject: Repair of computer monitors or flat panel TV’s.

History:
Recently my wife's 27-inch AKAI (LCT21AS) 27-inch flat panel HDTV with DVD player quit working. Years ago, when I had an analog computer monitor quit operating; Joe Fadden WA6DDF had mentioned to me, that often computer monitor problems were caused by the monitor's power supply. Joe also said these power supply problems were often caused by failed electrolytic capacitors. Joe said he was able to fix many computer monitors by just changing all of the power supply electrolytic capacitors. Rather the fix that failed monitor, I just a bought a new one.


Symptoms:
The inoperative HDTV had been bought at COSTCO and had already been returned once to a COSTCO repair center for repairs. Cost to ship and insure the HDTV was 67 dollars. We received back a new HDTV set. Turn around time was over a month, with many long distance telephone calls being required. The new HDTV worked for about three months after it was received. When the returned HDTV failed, it trapped a DVD disc that had been left in the HDTV DVD player. The new HDTV failure symptoms were the same as the original HDTV failure. The red led indication would not change to green when the remotes power on button was pushed. There was no picture and no sound. The remote is required to operate the TV set.


Economics:
My wife's HDTV with internal DVD player was very expensive. Worse yet, the trapped DVD disc was the movie Flash Gorden Space Soldiers 1936. A local TV shop wanted 85 dollars to look at the failed HDTV; repairs were 75 dollars labor an hour plus parts. I quickly figured out that if I could fix the problem it would save a lot of time and money.


Internet Search:
I checked the Internet to determine if other AKAI owners had similar problems with their HDTV sets. There were lots of AKAI 27 inch and 32 inch HDTV set owners listing problems. Without exception all of the complaints concerned the HDTV power supply PC board and failed electrolytic capacitors.


General Internet Consensus:
Most of the AKAI HDTV sets worked just great and that many had been sold worldwide. There were some AKAI HDTV sets that did have power supply problems. Most of the AKAI HDTV set owners were not very pleased with either AKAI or the COSTCO response to the inoperative HDTV power supply problem.


Trouble Shooting:
All electrical power was removed from the HDTV set. The HDTV was placed face down on a workbench with a piece of cardboard to protect the display screen. The HDTV back panel cover was removed. There were many screws of several different sizes. The power supply PC board was separate from the rest of the set's components and was easily identified. The power supply PC board contained several different individual different voltage power supplies. Three electrolytic capacitors located on the PC board had obviously failed. The tops of these three capacitors were puffed out. Often when electrolytic capacitors fail they get over heated and the top of the capacitor is puffed out displaying an over pressurized appearance. The power supplies on the PC board were of the switching type. Switching type power supplies are also used in computer monitors to save money and weight.


Power Supply PC Board Removal:
The power supply PC board was mounted to the HDTV back panel with several screws. These screws were removed. There also several multi-pin connectors attached to the PC board. These connectors were numbered with a black felt marker to ensure correct reinstallation. The connectors were Hot-glued in place. A sharp knife was used to remove the hot glue. The connectors were removed.


Repair:
The three suspect failed capacitors were easily removed. The three capacitors were each 1000 ufd and rated at 16 working volts. The other power supply PC board electrolytic capacitors were visibly checked. Three new capacitors were installed, they were rated at 1000 ufd at 25 working volts. On the PC board the three electrolytic capacitors were in just one of the power supply circuits and were identified as EC18, EC19, and EC20.


The New Electrolytic capacitors:
These were low impedance / high reliability radial lead polarized aluminum capacitors, they have a plus and minus connection pins. Correct installation of any polarized capacitor is required. The three new electrolytic capacitors were specifically designed and rated for service in switching type power supply circuits. Switching type power supply electrolytic capacitors need to be both very robust and designed for use in high frequency circuits. General-purpose aluminum electrolytic capacitors should not be used in switching type power supplies, if capacitors designed for switching power supplies can be obtained.


Final Repair Steps:
The PC board was reinstalled without the electrical connectors to the PC board being hot glued. The HDTV back panel cover was refastened. Watched episodes one through five of Space Soldiers. It was well worth the time and three electrolytic capacitors to fix the problem. The repairs saved a lot of time and money. The repair was very simple and not the least challenging. It took longer to remove and then reinstall the HDTV back cover panel than it took to replace the three failed capacitors.



Safety:
These types of repairs should not be attempted without a complete understanding of the dangers involved with working on electrical equipment, especially working around power supplies and charged capacitors. Proper desoldiering and soldiering techniques need to be used.

Conclusions:
Flat screen computer monitors and TV sets do fail. Repairs of electronic equipment can be very expensive. When your computer monitor or flat screen TV does fail, you might consider a visible inspection of the equipments power supply. A simple repair might save you a lot of time and money.


Jul 31, 2008 | Akai LCT2785TA 27 in. LCD Television

2 Answers

No Power


Power supply problems are a good possibility. If you have a DC voltmeter, you could check the outputs. In standby mode, you should see at least a +5 volt supply. This standby line is necessary to power the logic circuitry, particularly the microprocessor. In the full on mode (VCR power on), other voltages should be present in addition to the +5. You should see a +12-14 volt, (powers the capstan, video drum, & other motors if present, & possibly a supply for the LCD display of somewhere around -35 volts. A common cause for a non-working power supply in early VCRS ('80s & early '90s), such as Panasonic manufactured rigs, is defective electrolytic capacitors used to filter the above noted supplies, especially the in the +5 & +12 volt lines. Sometimes a capacitor in the primary side of the supply will go bad, causing the dead symptom. Obviously, a schematic is beneficial especially if you are a novice. If by chance bad electrolytics are the cause, and you wish to repair it, I'd suggest using capacitors designed for these switching power supplies, such as the Panasonic FC series available from Digi-Key and other suppliers. If by chance you do have one of these early rigs, these were excellent units. Most early VCRs were made like tanks, very unlike the "made to break" junkers of the last 10+ years.

May 21, 2007 | Panasonic AG-1980 S-VHS VCR

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