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Condenser frost's up on my heat pump - Heating & Cooling

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  • niberado Nov 29, 2008

    my air conditioner outside unit is completely frosted up but it refuses to go onto DEFROST. I have once seen it on defrost ( it shows DF on the led  panel). It does not have any sensor wires between the two units - just the compressor & fan power lines. So I guess the defrost is invoked on the  two temperature sensors & time.  I desperation I have inserted about 1000 ohms into the hot pipe thermistor line ( it measures about 1840 ohms on the diode setting of my voltmeter ) . This inhibits it blowing when the hot pipe is not warm enough - but it still will not go onto defrost.
    I suspect it takes several hours to consider going onto defrost ,  but if I knew what the logic was , I might be able to trick it into defrosting more often.

  • niberado Mar 01, 2009

    further data on refusal to de frost after a rather cold winter ( often -1 to -3C ).It seems that the microprocessor learns over a few days and if left on in v cold weather , the unit will defrost every 90 minutes or so.  most are short defrosts of about 5 mins , then i think it does the occassional 10min defrost. BUT it is not enough , the outside unit is more or less completely frosted up with no thru airflow. It is a very cheap unit but works well above outside temp 4C 


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On a heat pump the system reverses during the heat cycle to bring in outside heat that will cause the outside coils to ice up. There is a defrost timer or pc board to send the unit into defrost every so often. This is a common problem with heat pumps or possibly low or refrigerant. Heat pumps will freeze up at low outside temps, but unless your in the Artic right now that shouldn't be a problem.

Posted on Sep 27, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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KNOWING ABOUT CONDENSER


What is a condenser?
Is a device or unit used to condense vapor into liquid. A condenser is simply one component of an air conditioner. Whether you have an outdoor air conditioner or a window unit air conditioner your air conditioner contains a condenser.
Condensers are used in outdoor air conditioning systems as well as heat pump systems. Condensers in an air conditioning unit have very few controls. They will have an on and off switch. Occasionally these air conditioners will also have a brown out option. This option shuts down the compressor when the electrical current is low.
A condenser is simply a heat exchanger. It compresses refrigerants into a hot gas to then condense them into a liquid. A condenser is a major component in a air conditioning or heat pump unit. It moves air across the coils to facilitate the transfer of heat.
In a heat pump unit the condenser has a few more features. It will have a reverse valve that allows the unit to switch back and forth between air conditioning and heating. Even when the unit is heating, it uses the condenser for defrosting the coils. If the coils become layered with frost it will effect the units effectiveness this is defrosted when the reverse valve switches to air conditioning mode to move the hot gases through the coils melting the built up ice. It will automatically switch back to heating mode once the ice is cleared to once again heat the home.
To keep your unit in good operating condition it is vital to keep the area around the condenser clear of all debris as well as keeping the filter clear of dust and dirt. A clean machine makes a happy machine. A happy machine will keep you cool during the summer months and warm during the cold months. It is suggested to change the units filters when they become dirty, depending on your area and conditions near your home this may be as often as once a month or as seldom as every 3 to 6 months. You will have to pay close attention to your units needs to decide the right time to change or clean your unit’s filters.
It is very important no matter what type of unit you have to prevent the blockage of the condenser. If the condenser becomes block it can effect the units efficiency or even cause the until to completely fail. For this reason it is one of the most important components of a cooling or heating system. A condenser allows the maximum airflow to the unit.
Keeping you condenser in good running condition will not only prolong the life of your heat or cooling system but also provide you with the most efficient heat and cooling system saving you money on heat and cooling.www.victorwod1234.blogspot.com

on Apr 08, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

When the heat pump is running in the fall, I notice frost build up the next morning. What cold cause this problem?


Heat Pumps and Refrigerators are the same unit running backwards. To get refrigeration you create heat, to get heat, you create frost. The end blower is the thing that either gives you heat or cold air depending on what setting you are choosing.

To stop the frost building up, you just need to cover that area with insulation. The frost is caused by a cold surface that is below freezing point and water vapour in the ambient air.

Nov 19, 2016 | Frost Refrigerators

1 Answer

To continue from my last Question, to do with HVAC Evaporator/Condenser Cycles, how often should the System go into Heat Standby, Heat Defrost, and Heat Modes? What are Heat Standby and Heat Defrost?


In this type of system (heat pump), the evap and condenser swap functions by means of a reversing valve, according to the mode selected. Evaps throw off cool air, condensers, warm air. In heat mode, the condenser is the indoor coil and it throws off heat from the outside air. Vice versa for the cooling mode. Heat Standby would be whenever the temperature thermistor has reached set point by the user and shuts down the system. Heat defrost is the cycle that reverses refrigerant flow and defrosts the outdoor coil by sending warm refrigerant liquid to that coil. In heat mode, the outdoor coil builds frost and ice on its surface.

Feb 05, 2015 | Refrigerators

1 Answer

Should the outside fan be running when the heat pump is running. I am getting a frost build up outside on the coils.


outside fan ( condenser cooling fan ) need not run all the time . if it is frosting it can be seen from outside.

May 03, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I have 4 ton carrier heat pump / puron. It is a new system been installed about 3 months. Live near Dallas Texas and lately the temp has dropped into the low 40's at night. The heat seems too be working...


The water is from humidity in the outdoor air which has condensed and then frozen to your heat pump outdoor coil. The heat pump will defrost occassionally, depending on how much frost has accumulated to the coil and will then generally drip off the unit and onto the ground. This is normal. To keep the water off the drive way may mean having to move the heat pump to a place where the condensation can run away from the drive area. Or provide some other means of redirecting the water.

Nov 20, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Installation manual required for teco split aircondtioner. Reverse cycle LS0909Y. I have operation manual but not sure how to install and wire up. Many thanks.


Is the unit an AC only or a heat pump?
Wiring to the units should in the manual or online.
Both units proper house voltage to inside unit and outside unit.There will also be a two wire low voltage cable between thr two.This is so the inside unit can turn on the higher current draw of the compressor in the outside condenser unit thru it's relay.If you have a heat pump there will also be a set of two wires to the 4 way gas valve in the condenser unit to change from heating to cooling mode,a set of two wires to control the on/off function of the fan in the condenser unit when it needs to defrost and mayby a two wire set to a themal sensor in the condenser to sense if it is frosting up when system is in heat mode.
Try to get a wiring diagram and if you can't get to the point where you understand how to wire the unit don't guess! Call someone who knows wiring or call a pro, he can you money over the cost of replacing parts if unit is miswired.

Oct 06, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I have a heat pump that when turned on the tube get cold and condensation develops but 45 seconds later cooling stops and compressor keeps running. the coil for the reversing valve is not energized, there...


Sounds like low on freon. The suction line will turn cooler upon first start up. Heat pumps do sound scary but you all ready have cked the reverse valve coil, ck the lines in\out temp. If you can ck temps on your suction line vers press. repost if you need more help.

Jul 10, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

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