Question about Dell Inspiron XPS M140 Notebook

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Stop 0x000000F4 HEard this error can be caused by a bad CMOS battery? Where exactly is this located witin the laptop? DOes it require removal of the entire cover. I removed all the access panels but didn't see anything resembling this small watch battery type of battery.

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  • kambise Mar 22, 2009

    Inspiron 6000

    Stop 0x000000F4 (0x00000003, 0x89cedda0,0x89cedf14, 0x805c8c88)

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  • Dell Master
  • 998 Answers

The CMOS battery is located underneath the keyboard as well as one of the two memory slots. To get at it, you have to remove the “Hinge Cover” and then the Keyboard.
To remove the “Hinge Cover” (The hinge cover has the ON/OFF button) follow these steps:
1) Remove the battery and AC power.
2) In the battery bay you’ll see 2 small Phillips screws. Remove these screws.
3) Turn the laptop right side-up and using a small screwdriver, pry up on the notch on the right side of the hinge cover.
4) Lift and remove the hinge cover from the laptop.
5) Carefully lift the keyboard and gently slide it towards the LCD. (CAUTION! The keyboard is connected to the motherboard with a ribbon cable. Be careful not to damage the cable on the underside of the keyboard.)
6) The CMOS battery is located on the right side of a small white ribbon cable. It’s about the size of a small coin.
Hope this helps.

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Posted on Oct 20, 2008

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CMOS Checksum error


<b>Issue:</b><br /> CMOS Checksum Bad or CMOS Date/Time Not Set<br /> <br /> <img src="matrix12_1.jpg" /> <br /> <br /> <b>Cause:</b><br /> This issue is caused when the CMOS values are incorrect. This issue can occur because of any of the below possibilities.<br /> * Bad or old CMOS battery. <br /> * BIOS update<br /> <br /> <b>Workaround 1:</b><br /> 1. Disconnecting power from computer without shutting down computer.<br /> 2. Attempt to reboot the computer. If error still occurs after rebooting the computer enter CMOS setup and check all values, this includes verifying the time and date are correct. Once everything has been verified and/or changed make sure you save and exit CMOS setup. <br /> 3. If you have a Phoenix BIOS and have an option for 'Reset Configuration Data', set this value to 'Yes' and save and exit the CMOS. <br /> <p>4. If the computer was had the power disconnected while it was still running it is possible this could cause the CMOS to become corrupt. Ensure that the computer is ready to be shut off before turning off the computer. If you have a laptop computer ensure that the battery is charged before disconnecting the power connection. <br /> 5. If the CMOS values have become corrupted entering the values in CMOS setup and saving and exiting CMOS should resolve your issues.<br /> <p><b>Note:</b> If this issue continues to occur after you turn off your computer off it is possible that the CMOS battery may be failing or already bad. Before considering replacing the CMOS battery try leaving your computer on for several days. <br /> <b>Workaround 2:</b><br /> <p>If you performed workaround 1 and the error occurs again after a complete power down (i..e. removing the power cord), the CMOS battery is likely bad. Most systems use a small coin style lithium battery. These often last 3-6 years, but at some point run out of juice and need to be replaced. For desktops, your system manual or motherboard manual should specify the type of battery and location on the motherboard. For laptops, it is often very difficult to access and may require a professional to replace it. To replace the battery on a desktop system:<br /> 1. Turn off the system and remove the power plug.<br /> 2. Remove the case or side panel to access the motherboard. <br /> 3. Look for a round silver coin cell, typically in a black holder.<br /> <br /> <br /> <img src="matrix12_0.jpg" /> <br /> 4. Remove the battery while noting which way the battery is located. You may need a small flat screwdriver to release the side clip. <br /> 5. Install the replacement battery with the same battery type, being careful to insert it in the same direction as the removed battery (or using the polarity marked on the holder or manual). <br /> 6. Reassemble the case and power. <br /> 7. Turn on the power. You will get the CMOS Checksum Bad error once more, but it should be the last time. Go into the BIOS setup and set the date and time, and any other options you prefer.<br /> <br /> <br /> Hope this will help...Your response is very much appreciated...

on Jan 24, 2011 | Computers & Internet

Tip

CMOS Checksum error


Issue:
CMOS Checksum Bad or CMOS Date/Time Not Set


ae4e911.jpg
Cause:
This issue is caused when the CMOS values are incorrect. This issue can occur because of any of the below possibilities.
* Bad or old CMOS battery.
* BIOS update.

Workaround 1:
1. Disconnecting power from computer without shutting down computer.
2. Attempt to reboot the computer. If error still occurs after rebooting the computer enter CMOS setup and check all values, this includes verifying the time and date are correct. Once everything has been verified and/or changed make sure you save and exit CMOS setup.
3. If you have a Phoenix BIOS and have an option for 'Reset Configuration Data', set this value to 'Yes' and save and exit the CMOS.
4. If the computer was had the power disconnected while it was still running it is possible this could cause the CMOS to become corrupt. Ensure that the computer is ready to be shut off before turning off the computer. If you have a laptop computer ensure that the battery is charged before disconnecting the power connection.
5. If the CMOS values have become corrupted entering the values in CMOS setup and saving and exiting CMOS should resolve your issues.
Note: If this issue continues to occur after you turn off your computer off it is possible that the CMOS battery may be failing or already bad. Before considering replacing the CMOS battery try leaving your computer on for several days.
Workaround 2:
If you performed workaround 1 and the error occurs again after a complete power down (i..e. removing the power cord), the CMOS battery is likely bad. Most systems use a small coin style lithium battery. These often last 3-6 years, but at some point run out of juice and need to be replaced. For desktops, your system manual or motherboard manual should specify the type of battery and location on the motherboard. For laptops, it is often very difficult to access and may require a professional to replace it. To replace the battery on a desktop system:
1. Turn off the system and remove the power plug.
2. Remove the case or side panel to access the motherboard.
3. Look for a round silver coin cell, typically in a black holder.


06928b6.jpg
4. Remove the battery while noting which way the battery is located. You may need a small flat screwdriver to release the side clip.
5. Install the replacement battery with the same battery type, being careful to insert it in the same direction as the removed battery (or using the polarity marked on the holder or manual).
6. Reassemble the case and power.
7. Turn on the power. You will get the CMOS Checksum Bad error once more, but it should be the last time. Go into the BIOS setup and set the date and time, and any other options you prefer.

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It is blue screen error. Try to reset your CMOS Battery of your CPU or Change that Battery. I hope it will work.

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The problem is hardware, you should check that everything is working well, if the PC has more than 1 RAM module remove the rest and leave it with a single RAM, on the other hand, check that the hard drive is working well as peripheral and connectors, you can also delete the CMOS Memory, using the Jumper located next to the battery on the motherboard.

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I want to that how i reset my recovery password and where the actual location of CMOS Battery?


In computing, BIOS (basic input output settings) refers to the information stored regarding a computer's hardware configuration, the system date and time and any applied password. This information is known as the BIOS or CMOS settings--the BIOS is stored on a small battery-powered semiconductor chip known as the CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor). Having a CMOS or BIOS password restricts unauthorized changes to the system's hardware configuration and, in some computers, may even be required for booting. A lost password may be reset by removing the CMOS battery, clearing the motherboard jumper or using a software-based password cracker.

Removing CMOS Battery
1. Shut down the laptop and unplug its power cord from the wall outlet. Remove the battery cover under the laptop and gently raise the battery from its dock. Unplug any peripheral devices with a live power source connected to the laptop, such as a modem or printer.

2. Locate and remove the CMOS battery. Refer to your user manual or visit the manufacturer's website for your laptop's architecture. Follow manufacturer recommended procedure to access and remove the CMOS battery. Depending on make and model, this procedure may be more involved for some laptops and not others. The CMOS battery is a flat circular shape and resembles a watch battery.

3. Wait 30 minutes and then put the battery back in. This will erase all information stored in BIOS. Assemble the laptop, making sure you leave no loose connections. Power up the laptop and press "F1" when you get the "CMOS cheksum error" message. Type in a new password.

Clearing CMOS Jumper
1.Turn off the laptop and access the motherboard following recommended procedures.
2.Locate the jumper in the motherboard. If you do not have your motherboard documentation, locate a single jumper near the CMOS battery. In some laptops, the jumper may also be labeled in the motherboard. Put the jumper setting to "Clear" and reassemble the laptop.
3.Turn on the computer and hit "F1" when the "CMOS checksum error" message is displayed. Navigate through the BIOS settings interface to load default settings and apply a new password.

Using Password Remover
1.Download a software-based BIOS password cracker. There are numerous free programs able to recover or delete CMOS or BIOS passwords from virtually all motherboard brands. Download the file from a trusted source and save it to the desktop.
2.Burn the installed file to a CD using image burner software. Insert the CD and access the password remover tool.
3.Note the password or use the program to set a new password.

I hope you find it very helpful. Thank you for using fixya.

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Solutions to CMOS Checksum Bad Error

The CMOS Checksum Bad Error can be fixed easily by following the listed steps carefully.

CMOS Battery may not be functioning properly

If you suspect that your CMOS battery is not functioning properly, you can easily change it. Before changing your battery, reboot your computer to make sure that the error still exists. If it does, go into your CMOS and write down all of the settings. If all the settings are lost, you can usually retrieve them from your computer manufacturer. Now locate the battery and remove it, you might need to consult your computer's manual or technical support to remove your battery (the battery a flat, shiny silver colored and coin-shaped). Take down the CMOS battery's information such as volt, size, etc. Once you have your new battery, you can replace it and reenter your CMOS settings. If your battery was the cause of the CMOS Checksum Bad Error, you should have solved the problem.

Your BIOS may have been updated

If your BIOS have been updated recently, your CMOS settings may have reset. Make sure that the values entered in the BIOS are correct or simply reset them to the default settings. If you believe that a virus has updated your BIOS settings, run a virus scan and make sure that the BIOS settings are back to the default.

The Computer may not have been shut down properly

Sometimes when running MS Windows, if you shut down your computer without first properly shutting down your operating system, it will corrupt the CMOS settings causing the CMOS Checksum Bad Error. You can easily avoid this error by making sure that you completely shut down your computer properly before turning off the main power. Usually this entails going into the Start Menu, clicking on Turn Off Computer/ Shut Down. If improper shutdown was the cause of the error, you may have solved the issue.



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You will most likely have to remove the backup battery temporarily to allow the CMOS to clear the password lock.
The instructions for removing the CMOS battery are located here.
Be sure to disconnect the power cord and remove the standard battery when performing this work.
Be very careful to follow the directions exactly as shown.
You may have to leave the CMOS battery removed for a number of hours in order to clear the CMOS password.

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There are usually three main reasons that a CMOS Checksum Bad Error has occurred. They include:
  • CMOS Battery may not be functioning properly. The battery life may have expired.
  • Your BIOS may have been updated (either by user or possibly a virus)
  • The computer may not have been shut down properly e.g. shutting off the computer's main power without first shutting down the computer (MS Windows requires you to shut down your computer before shutting off the power).
Solutions to CMOS Checksum Bad Error The CMOS Checksum Bad Error can be fixed easily by following the listed steps carefully.
CMOS Battery may not be functioning properly
If you suspect that your CMOS battery is not functioning properly, you can easily change it. Before changing your battery, reboot your computer to make sure that the error still exists. If it does, go into your CMOS and write down all of the settings. If all the settings are lost, you can usually retrieve them from your computer manufacturer. Now locate the battery and remove it, you might need to consult your computer’s manual or technical support to remove your battery (the battery a flat, shiny silver colored and coin-shaped). Take down the CMOS battery’s information such as volt, size, etc. Once you have your new battery, you can replace it and reenter your CMOS settings. If your battery was the cause of the CMOS Checksum Bad Error, you should have solved the problem.

Your BIOS may have been updated
If your BIOS have been updated recently, your CMOS settings may have reset. Make sure that the values entered in the BIOS are correct or simply reset them to the default settings. If you believe that a virus has updated your BIOS settings, run a virus scan and make sure that the BIOS settings are back to the default.
The Computer may not have been shut down properly
Sometimes when running MS Windows, if you shut down your computer without first properly shutting down your operating system, it will corrupt the CMOS settings causing the CMOS Checksum Bad Error. You can easily avoid this error by making sure that you completely shut down your computer properly before turning off the main power. Usually this entails going into the Start Menu, clicking on Turn Off Computer/ Shut Down. If improper shutdown was the cause of the error, you may have solved the issue

Mar 05, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional With...

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