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When connecting video or set-top box using composite video cable picture is black and white. If I use S-video I get colour. Video only has scart and tv only has composite/component/s video connectors so I am using a scart to composite or scart to s-video adapter. TV is a new Philips LCD

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  • jondubai Sep 21, 2008

    Thanks - I'm using HDMI on the DVD. Unfortunately the STB from my service provider is fairly primitive and only has scart of composite video output.

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You really cant convert to component. it defeats the whole purpose of upgrading your tv. with your tv you should be using hdmi to connect all your devices your cable box should deffinatly have one. any time you connect component to something else you will get black and white hdmi is totally digital where as component is still analog pluse you dont need audio cables with hdmi its just one digital cable

Posted on Sep 21, 2008

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My TV rca model hd52w68 HV black in white Pict


I think you were trying to say you have a black and white picture(?) Make sure you haven't connected a composite(yellow) video source to a component (red/blue/green) connection on the TV.(If you connect a composite video to the green component connector,it will appear to be in black and white).

Jun 09, 2014 | Televison & Video

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Telefunken analogue color TV model MP-A2055VT-H to connect up digital decoder set-top box. The TV only has an RF input. no other plugs. Searched all 80 channels and I cannot find an AV channel on the...


Hi,

The simplest solution would probably be the use of an RF Modulator. Feed the RF Mod with the A/V signals from the Conia CSTB12, set it to transmit on Ch 3 or 4, tune the Telefunken to either channel.

In most Telefunken TVs we have worked on, the A/V INput/OUTput would be on the SCART connectors as shown below.
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To my understanding, a Conia CSTB12 as sold in Australia has a composite RCA (yellow) Video OUTput and L/R White/Red audio OUTputs. What would be needed would be a A/V signal to SCART adapter/converter.
7906648.jpg
If your Conia CSTB12 has an S-Video, then this may be used.
If your Conia CSTB12 has an HDMI, then something like this may be used.
Incidentally, should you be interested, there are comparable receivers to a Conia CSTB12 that has SCART OUTputs.

Hope this be of initial help/idea. Pls post back how things turned up or should you need additional information.

Good luck and kind regards. Thank you for using FixYa.



Sep 14, 2008 | Televison & Video

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How do I hook up my dish network and a wii console at the same time if I don't have the tv/ant cable I just have the red, yellow, and white cables?


Yellow is Video, Red & White are Audio, these wire color to color from unit to TV. Use these for the Wii, and the Dish, output will wire the same, if that is the ONLY way to output the signal... You can get "Splitter" boxes that allow a two to one, switchable input. Usually though, it's out with one, in with the other. most modern TV's have multiple ways of getting video into the set. Do you have any "other" Video/Audio inputs? Like, SVHS, Composite, Component? If so then you use one each and choose of the menu on the TV. Connecting this up will be easy. What you do is get a yourself a set of the right, for your setup, cables. That uses EITHER one of the formats, of these described, below. You will need, either, a THREE way Cable, or three separate " Coaxial Cored" Cables with RCA PLUGS on them. ColoredYellow, (Video) Red, & White. (Audio) AV. OR If you have SCARTConnection Sockets, it's a big Black Socket at rear of unit(s), you get aSCART Cable.& It's all inside. Now some units, use a standard calledComponent Video, that uses, a Green, Red, & Blue Plugs. Now, with the Component setup, you will also ,need, Two more Cables, for the AV Audio. these are, Red & White.(So with Component Video there are 5 Cables/Plugs in all). In any event ALL Cables go Color to Color, at each end, plugging into the corresponding Colored RCA Jacks, on either machine, or VCR or TV. Now if you have SCART, then it simply plugs in only one way. It is that simple. So connect up with the leads your set uses, and select the correct "Input" from TV/Remote, it is NOT on a "Channel" it will be on AV, AUX, and Press "Play" on VCR/DVD whatever.... should be all go.

Mar 03, 2010 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

Hi I have a Philips 32inch ambilight TV about


No a lot of HDMI does NOT send the sound signal through the HDMI cable & must be run AV to AV, the RED WHITE & YELLOW plugs Color to color for RED & WHITE, the YELLOW is Composite Video. . The SCART should indeed have it "All in one" however that signal is only RGB, or Composite Video, a lower quality, than HDMI. Just use HDMI & AV. you'll be all good.

Feb 06, 2010 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

I get a color picture when i hook up the WII(FRONT) but not when i hook it up to a converter box(in the back) to watch basic TV. Is there another type of connection i need. Unfortunately i don't have...


What color jacks are you connecting your box to. Sounds like you are connecting 3 wire video or component connection incorrectly. Green,Blue,Red wires require same on both ends. If not correctly connected you will get the picture you are describing. The yellow wire composite video requires only one wire. I see this all the time . Some one has connected the yellow wire out the the green component in.The componet video takes 3 wires for video and 2 for sound five all together. the composite video yellow wire takes 1 video and 2 audio wires. Can't mix them together they are different. Hope this helps you.

Dec 18, 2009 | RCA D52W23 52" HDTV CRT TV

1 Answer

Channels won't come in


Hello divalisaf,

These are a few things I want you to check first.

1) Make sure the cable set top box is on and the cable is connected to the TV properly (This may seem simple but I have had to charge many people a $60.00 service fee plus a $70.00 travel fee just to turn on a cable set top box)

2) Make sure the TV is set to the proper input you are using (RF( F connector) , HDMI, Component video, and or Composite Video)

3) Make sure the TV is set to the proper channel (either channel 3 or channel 4 depending on your area) The cable set top box should be action as your tuner.

If all of these conditions are met, then we can begin troubleshooting.

First determine if the other inputs work (HDMI, Component video (RGB), Composite video (yellow), s-Video (6 pronged black cable).
If the inputs work then you possibly have a tuner problem
If the inputs don't work then then problem is likely in the video microprocessor.

If the problem is in the tuner or the connective circuitry then we will have to determine where to get a replacement tuner (or you can just use one of your other video inputs)

If the problem is in the video section (which includes the microprocessor) we are going to have to troubleshoot the video section which will involve you having a background in electronics, if not I would suggest having a qualified TV technician perform service on this TV.

I hope this helps,

Thank you,

Shuttle83

Nov 25, 2008 | RCA HD56W66 56" HDTV

1 Answer

HD 1080p TV


Hey peterman,

Depending on the TV model that you purchased, you may have four to five different options that you can use to make the necessary connections for your home theater: composite, component, S-video, DVI and HDMI cabling.

Composite cabling may often be considered to be the "lowest quality" type of cable that you can use to connect two devices in your home theater, and generally consists of three color-coded cables: one yellow, one red and one white. While the yellow cable is typically used to transmit the video signal to your TV, the red and white cables transmit the right and left audio channels respectively. Composite video is somewhat limited in the fact that it is primarily intended for use with analog TV sets - by using composite cabling you may limit the quality of picture your HDTV is able to display.

Analog component cabling then can be viewed as a “step up” from composite cabling. Rather than transmitting video information over a single cable, component cabling instead uses three. Each of these cables transmits a different portion of a video image, and can often be found in bundles with one red, one green and one blue cable. Please keep in mind that component cabling still requires the use of a secondary cable to carry an audio signal, which may need to be purchased separately.

The primary benefit of using component over composite cabling is that many users may report a cleaner, more brilliant image on their TV as a result. This is not a guarantee however, as picture quality is often based as much on personal preference as it is the actual configuration and settings of the equipment used.

Often considered “in-between” composite and component cabling is S-video. Like component video, S-video cables split the information sent to your TV into multiple analog signals…two signals, to be precise. Unlike component video however, these two separate signals are sent using the same cable. Again, when using this type of connection a separate cable for audio signals is necessary.

DVI cabling is the first truly digital option available to most consumers. While it only carries a video signal (like its analog counterparts), DVI cabling can frequently be found connecting computers to monitors or digital projectors. These types of cables will have a unique shape that prevents them from being used as anything other than a video connection, and were designed to optimize signals transmitted from external devices to a visual display.

HDMI on the other hand, is another widely available digital alternative. Unlike DVI, HDMI cables support both video and audio signals, allowing consumers to avoid the proverbial “rat’s nest” behind a home theater system that one might encounter when using multiple cables.

Because HDMI cabling was developed to be backwards compatible with DVI, HDMI and DVI connections may often be able to be used interchangeably using special adaptors. Essentially, if your HD receiver/Blu-ray player only has DVI outputs and your HDTV only has HDMI inputs, you may still be able to connect those devices to your HDTV using the proper accessories.

While some major retailers may recommend using HDMI cables first and foremost over the other alternatives, this does not necessarily always make them the best choice to use. The quality of an image displayed on an HDTV will always be dependent as much on the TV itself, as it is on personal preference and other external devices. Yes, the type of cables used does play a part, but they should never be treated as the only factor to consider when setting up your home theater.

Should you have any questions or lingering doubts, I would strongly suggest speaking with a Magnolia Home Theater agent at your local Best Buy™ store for more information. Most stores will have similar TV's on display using more than one type of connection, and sales associates are always able to provide additional suggestions if desired.

Hope this helps you out.

Sincerely,
Aaron
Go Ahead. Use Us.

Jun 24, 2008 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

Poor picture quality on my samsung HD TV


Hey xf1racer,

Based on the description that you provided, it sounds like you are using a bundled composite video cable to connect your cable box and TV. Composite video cables generally consist of three color-coded cables: one yellow, one red and one white. While the yellow cable is typically used to transmit the video signal to your TV, the red and white cables transmit the right and left audio channels respectively.

Red/green/blue bundled cables however, are often referred to as component video cables - each of the three colored cables is used to transmit a different portion of the same video image from one device to another, and require a second separate cable (typically red/white) to transmit an audio signal.

The primary benefit of using component over composite cabling is that many users may report a cleaner, more brilliant image on their TV as a result. Please keep in mind however that this is not a guarantee that changing from your current set-up to component cables will improve the picture quality on your TV, as picture quality is often based as much on personal preference as it is the actual configuration and settings of the equipment used.

Additionally, many retailers may suggest changing your current configuration to one using HDMI cables instead to improve picture quality even further. Unlike composite and component cables, standard coaxial cables, and S-Video cables which transmit analog signals, HDMI cables are designed to instead transmit uncompressed digital signals. This typically means that more information is available for your TV to process in terms of color hue, color intensity, as well as image resolution. Again, remember that any perceived improvements will be based on both personal preference as well as your home theater configuration.

Should you have any questions or lingering doubts, I would strongly suggest speaking with a Magnolia Home Theater agent at your local Best Buy™ store for more information. Most stores will have similar TV's on display using more than one type of connection, and sales associates are always able to provide additional suggestions if desired.

Hope this helps you out.

Sincerely,
Aaron
Go Ahead. Use Us.

May 10, 2008 | Samsung PCL545R 54" Rear Projection...

1 Answer

Hi there, Ive recently bought a Monster Scart cable to connect to a 40" full HD sony bravia LCD tv. When the tv was first switched on using the foxtel cable it looked perfect and when we switched over to...


What type of equipment are you using with the scart cable.the sony has limited video processing on the regular video imputs(composite and s-video).I have the 46 inch version,and it too looks like crap on the low end video.

Mar 07, 2008 | Televison & Video

2 Answers

Cable conectors ?


yes just run your cable through a vcr. then to input such as a composite or component vid. or most cable boxes have composite out.. THE yellow cable. Then on your set switch to that input. ...

Dec 19, 2007 | RCA D52W20 52" Rear Projection HDTV-Ready...

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