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Making a shared folder

My manager wants me to setup a shared folder in the office so that all the computers can access the files. I tried doing this using the network setup wizard, but i have no clue what it has just done, It says I need to go the shared folder in my computer, but I cant find any of the files that need to be shared, even though i put them in there and made them sharable. what do I need to do?

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Go to this site http://fhctech.org/fhc/networking/xp-sharing-folder.htm for winxp or
http://kb.iu.edu/data/ahrs.html For win2000

http://www.maximumpcguides.com/share-a-folder-in-windows-vista/ for vista

Hope this helps if not please specify the Operating system of your computer

Posted on Sep 17, 2008

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HP1020 problem with a livebox and WIN7 configuration


I found it somewhat difficult to completely Unshare files and folders on my HomeGroup Network and still allow Printer sharing in Windows 7 (Home Premium).

Initial UnSharing still allowed files like those below to be viewed on other home network computers:

C:/Users/

{user x} (folder)

AppData (folder)

Default (folder

Public (folder)

desktop.ini (file)

Other computers on the home network could step through many levels of hiarchy in the AppData folder and appeared to have "Delete" access!!

To completely decouple the computers, I had to go through the following several different Sharing/Unsharing assignment locations, till I could completely break the linkage.

I would appreciate any clarifications or simplifications.

File UnShare Confusion on HomeGroup Network

There are several different Network Sharing/Protection assignment locations in Windows 7.

To prevent all sharing between computers on the Homegroup Network, but allow Printer Sharing:

1) Start->Control Panel ->Network and Sharing Center->Choose Homegroup and sharing options.

Uncheck sharing boxes that you don't want to share. Save changes.

2) Start->Control Panel ->Network and Sharing Center->Choose Homegroup and sharing options->Change advanced sharing settings.

Click "Turn off Public folder sharing (people logged on to this computer can still access these folders)".

3) Start->Control Panel ->Network and Sharing Center->Choose Homegroup and sharing options->Change advanced sharing settings.

Choose Media streaming options.

Click "Block All" button. Turn off. Click OK.

Anomaly Note: You have to close Control Panel and repeat all step 3 again for the change to take effect.

4) Open Windows Explorer.

a) Select "C:/", select "Users" folder with single click, then click "Share with" in toolbar.

b) Select Advanced sharing.

Under Sharing tab, select Advanced Sharing. Uncheck box labeled "Share this folder". Apply and close.

5) Open Windows Explorer.

Select "C:/Users/", select all folders and files under "Users", then click "Share with" in toolbar, then click "Nobody".

6) Verify success by going to other home network computer(s) and trying to access your files and folders. You should only be able to see there is a computer and not be able to see any folders of files.

smooth printer service

Dec 16, 2012 | HP LaserJet 1020 Printer

1 Answer

I have a wireless router (WNDR3400) connected to a switch (about 10 computer connected to switch), and the switch is connected to the modem. For the network, all the wired computers can see and share...


Make sure all the computers wired and wireless are in the same workgroup.
To share files across all the computers and laptops on your network then -
All the computer and laptop in this network group must have their hard drive or folder/s set to SHARED (a hand symbol will be placed on these folders that are shared).
If there isn't a secutity problem then these folders and easy of file sharing then do not setup users and passwords on these folders.

Apr 18, 2012 | NetGear WNDR3400 N600 Wireless Dual Band...

1 Answer

I own microsoft office 2007 how can I download it onto my new hp mini110 which has no cd slot


"I have a netbook with no optical drive. How can I install Microsoft Office? A friend says I have to either buy Office as a download from Microsoft or get an illegal download - don't like either of those options. " Charles C from Iowa among many have asked this question.
There are several options for installing software onto a computer with no CD / DVD drive. We'll focus on Microsoft Office (as usual) but the same techniques can be used for almost any programs.
All these suggestion boil down to a simple truth - you can copy the contents of the Microsoft Office install disk to a folder which can be accessed from the netbook.
We have plenty of other netbooks on Office tips in our feature: Using Office on Netbook computers. Like this article, our feature was written on a netbook computer, so the advice is from hard personal experience.
Install disks are NOT that special There was a time when install disks were specially made so you could not copy them easily but those disks are rare these days. The installation files for Microsoft Office can be copied just like other files.
What really matters is the Product Key that's supplied with your purchase - it's that 25 character key which allows Microsoft Office to work normally. See What happens if your product key is stolen?
USB memory stick The easiest option is to copy the entire contents of the install CD to a USB memory stick or portable drive then plug that 'key' into the netbook.
Make a folder on the USB drive called, for example, Office 2007 Standard install.
Then copy the whole CD/DVD (sub-folders and all) with the root folder of the install disk copied to the new folder on the USB drive.
904-office%20install%20disk%20copied%20to%20folder%20on%20removable%20drive.jpg
Office install disk copied to folder on removable drive
When you plug the USB drive into the netbook, navigate to the install folder (ie what was the root folder of the original CD/DVD).
Double-click the setup program or right-click autorun and choose Install. This will start the install process just as it would from the CD/DVD.
Share a CD/DVD drive On a Windows network, any drive can be shared and 'seen' across the network by other authorized computers.
Go to the desktop computer, right-click on the CD/DVD drive and select Sharing (the exact menu wording depends on your version of Windows) then share the drive with appropriate permissions.
On the netbook computer, go to the Network option on the Start menu. Navigate to the desktop computer then the shared CD/DVD drive. You can then see the contents of the install disk, click on setup or autorun (as above) and the installation will begin.
Apple promoted a 'special' remote CD feature when they released the Macbook Air. It was hailed in many quarters as a wonderful innovation, despite the fact that Windows users have been able to do the same thing for years.
Copy to netbook across the network If setting up the CD/DVD as a network share doesn't suit, you can simply copy the install disk contents to a new folder on a desktop hard drive which is shared and accessible from the netbook.
On a Vista desktop machine the easiest option is copying to one of the 'Public' folders then make sure those folders are shared with the local network. The netbook computer can 'see' that shared folder on the desktop machine and you can install from there.
Alternatively, copy from the desktop CD/DVD to the netbook computer. Make some folders on the netbook shared with write permissions then open Explorer on the desktop computer navigate to the shared folders on the netbook. Copy the contents of the install CD/DVD from the desktop computer to the shared folder on the netbook. Install from the netbook folder.
Plug in a CD/DVD drive There are plenty of cheap USB CD/DVD drives available which you can buy to plug into your netbook. However, as you can see, there is usually no need because you can access an optical drive from a desktop computer via the local network.
Repairing Office In the olden days (ie a decade ago) if Microsoft Office had problems you'd have to dig out the install CD and reinstall.
For the last few versions of Office (Office 2007 and Office 2003 at least) that's rarely necessary. When Office is installed a copy of the key installation files is put in a hidden folder - if (when) Microsoft Office has a little nervy an auto-repair system should start and restore files from the source. Re-using the install disk is less common these days.

Article posted: Wednesday, 27 May 2009

Jun 17, 2011 | HP Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Can't Share Files/Folders over home network


That sounds more like the security settings on the pc are not set correctly. Should be nothing to do with the card or the laptop. This is just a windoze thing.

Share a drive or folder on the network To share a drive or folder on the network
  1. Open shortcutcold.gifWindows Explorer, and then locate the drive or folder you want to share.
  2. Right-click the drive or folder, and then click Sharing and Security.
    • If you are sharing a drive, on the Sharing tab, click If you understand the risk but still want to share the root of the drive, click here.
    • If you are sharing a folder, go to the next step.
  3. Do one of the following:
    • If the Share this folder on the network check box is available, select the check box.
    • If the Share this folder on the network check box is not available, this computer is not on a network. If you would like to set up a home or small office network, click the Network Setup Wizard link and follow the instructions to turn on file sharing. Once file sharing is enabled, begin this procedure again.
note.gif Notes
  • To open Windows Explorer, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, and then click Windows Explorer.
  • When you share a drive or folder, anyone who has user access to the network can read the contents of that drive or folder. If you want to remove the drive or folder from the network, follow steps 1 and 2 above to get to the Sharing tab. On the Sharing tab, in Network sharing and security, clear the Share this folder on the network check box.
  • To allow complete access to the contents of your shared drive or folder, follow steps 1 and 2 above to get to the Sharing tab. On the Sharing tab, in Network sharing and security, select the Allow network users to change my files check box.
  • To change the name of your folder on the network, in the Share name text box, type a new name for your folder. This will not change the name of the folder on your computer.
  • If you are logged on as a guest (a guest account provides access to the computer for any user who does not have a user account on the computer), you cannot create a shared folder.
  • The Sharing option is not available for the Documents and Settings, Program Files, and WINDOWS system folders. In addition, you cannot share folders in other user's profiles.

Apr 05, 2010 | D-Link WDA-2320 (ASKU54036) Wireless...

1 Answer

1) how can i do traffic control on my TP-Link TL-R402M router. because some1 in mu house keep watch movie from pps.tv . 2) how can i setup to let everyone only have limited access to surf website and...


step 1. start windows control panel administratrio, service ->file folder share... you can manage you profile share file or folder and who want to access here ...
step 2 You can click on control panel internet option
and you look a much tab can you setting to limitted access

Nov 12, 2009 | Computers & Internet

3 Answers

Vista Laptop cannot connect to XP users


go to control panel>>add and remove prgrams>>click on add/reomve windows components on the left panel.
make sure you have the system CD.
put a check mark in "networking services" and "other network files and print services" install the addtional services.
check the share volume, make sure you have given the user rights to access the drive.

Jan 30, 2009 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

1 Answer

I do have i mdb file on 1 pc and i need to shared wit 3 pc


First make sure all 3 PCs are on the same workgroup or domain. You can verify that in the System Properties, accessible by right-clicking the My Computer icon and selecting Properties, then selecting the Computer Name tab; below the Full Computer Name will be the domain or workgroup.

Once all 3 PCs are on the correct workgroup/domain, navigate to the folder where the file in question resides, and right-click the folder itself (not the file) and select Properties, and then the Sharing tab. From this tab you can select to share the folder, and set access restrictions if needed, and then the other 2 PCs should see the new share in their Network Places within a few minutes.

Dec 21, 2008 | Microsoft Office 2003 Basic Edition...

1 Answer

File sharing


it is possible

If you have multiple computers in your home and they are connected through a home network, you can share files among your computers. That means you no longer have to copy files to a floppy disk or USB flash drive to transfer them to another computer. Once you configure your computer to share files, you (or another user with the appropriate permissions) can, by using Windows Explorer, open them from other computers connected to the network, just like you’d open files that are stored on a single computer. You can also choose to have folders visible—but not modifiable—from other computers on the network.
To share files on your computer with other computers on a network, you need to:
Share a folder on your computer. This will make all of the files in the folder available to all the computers on your network (you can’t share individual files).
Set up user accounts on your computer for everyone who needs to connect to your shared folder. If any of the accounts are Limited User accounts (unless an account is a Computer Administrator account, it is a Limited User account), follow the steps in Set permissions for files and folders to enable them to open your files.

To access shared files that are on another computer on your network, you need to:
• Connect to the shared folder from other computers on the network. This procedure is described in Map a network drive.

Note: By default, file permissions only allow your user account and administrators on your local computer to open your files, regardless of whether a person is sitting at your keyboard or at another computer. It may help to keep these three things in mind when setting up file sharing:
• Files have user permission settings.
• Every computer has its own user database.
• Some accounts are administrator accounts and some aren’t.

Configure your computer to share files To share a folder on your computer so that files stored in the folder can be accessed from other computers on your home network
1.
Log on to your computer as an administrator. For more information, see Access the administrator account from the Welcome screen.
2.
Click Start, and then click My Documents.
68599-click-my-documents.gif 3.
Right-click the folder that you want to share, and then click Sharing and Security.
68599-click-sharing-and-security.gificotip.gif Tip: If you want to share your entire My Documents folder, open My Documents, and then click the Up button on the toolbar. You can then select the My Documents folder.
4.
If you see a message that reads, As a security measure, Windows has disabled remote access to this computer, click the Network Setup Wizard link. Then follow the instructions in How to set up your computer for home networking. On the File and printer sharing page of the Network Setup Wizard, be sure to select Turn on file and printer sharing. If you do not see this message, skip this step and go to step 5.
68599-click-network-setup-wizard.gif Note: If you do not see the Network Setup Wizard link or the Share this folder on the network check box, your computer probably has Simple File Sharing disabled. This is a common change made to computers used for business. In fact, it happens automatically when a computer joins an Active Directory domain. You should follow these instructions to share a folder instead.
5.
In the Properties dialog box, select the Share this folder on the network check box.
68599-click-share-this-folder.gif 6.
If you want to be able to edit your files from any computer on your network (instead of just being able to open them without saving any changes), select the Allow network users to change my files check box.
68599-click-allow-network-users-to-change-my-files.gif 7.
Click OK.
68599-click-ok.gif Windows Explorer will show a hand holding the folder icon, indicating that the folder is now shared.
To connect to the shared folder from another computer, follow the steps described in How to map a network drive.
Note: By default, only you and other people with an administrator account on the computer sharing the folder will be able to open your files. To limit access of specific users with an administrator account on the computer sharing the folder, read How to set permissions for files and folders.

Aug 14, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

2 Answers

Setting up 16 port switch


Dear This is the step You can get a complete home network up and running in 10 easy steps. Here's a summary of what's involved: Take stock of your existing hardware. If you wish to share an Internet connection using Internet Connection Sharing (ICS), choose which computer will be your ICS host. Decide what type of network technology you wish to use. Make a list of the hardware you need for each computer. Install the network adaptors and install your modem on the ICS host computer. Physically cable the computers together. Switch on all computers, printers and other peripherals. Make sure the ICS host is connected to the Internet. Run the Network Setup Wizard on the ICS host. Run the Network Setup Wizard on the other computers on the network. Let's take that step by step. 1. Take stock of your hardware Note each computer's location and its hardware, including peripherals such as printers and modems. 2. Choose your ICS host If you wish to share an Internet connection between your computers using Internet Connection Sharing (ICS), choose which computer will be your ICS host. The ICS host has a direct connection, either by dial-up modem or high-speed link, to the Internet and provides access to the Internet for other computers on the network. Ideally, the host should be a computer running Windows XP. I'll assume you have made this choice in the following steps. Apart from XP's easy handling of ICS, by using an XP computer as your ICS host you get the benefits of using the Internet Connection Firewall. 3. Choose a network technology The most common choices are Ethernet and wireless LANs. For an Ethernet LAN you will need to install a network interface card, or NIC, in each computer and run cabling between the computers. If you don't like the idea of opening your computer to install a network card, look for a USB adaptor instead. Depending on the size of your network, you may also need a network hub or router to provide interconnection between PCs on the LAN. Two PCs can get by using an RJ-45 crossover cable; three or more computers require a hub or multi-speed hub (called a switch). If you have a high-speed Internet connection, a high-speed router is a good option. The Network Setup Wizard includes links to detailed advice about configuring your network, including help on designing a network layout to suit your home. If you opt for a wireless LAN, you'll also need a NIC for each PC (there are versions which use USB adaptors as well). The big benefit for home environments is that a wireless LAN does away with the need for cabling. On the down side, though, wireless LANs tend to be slower, less robust and appreciably more expensive than traditional Ethernet LANs. In particular, wireless LANs do not always live up to their stated working range, and you may find factors such as your home's construction and design, plus interference from other devices affect your wireless LAN's performance. You may need to add an expensive Access Point to extend the range of the LAN and, even so, it may not be sufficient. The bottom line is, if you decide to go the wireless route, make sure the store will refund your money if the LAN will not provide reliable performance within the specified range. 4. Make a list of hardware needed Make a list of the hardware you need for each computer, not forgetting any cabling, and buy it. If you're a little dazzled by the choices and configurations, consider purchasing a networking kit. These kits contain all you need to set up a two- or three-PC network. If possible, look for hardware which features the Windows XP Logo, indicating it is fully compatible with XP. 5. Install the adaptors Install the network adaptors and install your modem on the ICS host computer (you can also let the computers connect to the Internet independently by installing modems on each). 6. Cable the computers Physically cable the computers (and hubs or routers) together. Of course, you won't need to do this if you've chosen to go the wireless route. If you're installing an Ethernet network and have a lot of cabling work to do, you may prefer to get a professional to come in and do this work for you. It won't be cheap, but you can be sure you get the job done correctly and hopefully with minimal damage done to walls, ceilings and floors. 7. Switch it on Switch on all computers, printers and other peripherals. 8. Connect the ICS host Go to the ICS host computer and make sure it is connected to the Internet. 9. Run the Network Setup Wizard on the ICS host To run the Network Setup Wizard on the ICS host, click Start -> Control Panel -> Network And Internet Connections -> Setup Or Change Your Home Or Small Office Network. Follow the instructions in each screen and press Next to continue. XP's Network Setup Wizard takes much of the pain out of setting up a home network. The Network Setup Wizard will guide you through: Configuring your network adaptors (NICs). Configuring your computers to share a single Internet connection. Naming each computer. (Each computer requires a name to identify it on the network.) Sharing the Shared Files folder. Any files in this folder will be accessible to all computers on the network. Sharing printers. Installing the Internet Connection Firewall to guard you from online attacks. 10. Run the Network Setup Wizard on all computers To do so: Insert the Windows XP CD in the first computer's drive. When the XP Welcome Menu appears, click Perform Additional Tasks. Click Setup Home Or Small Office Networking and follow the prompts. Repeat steps 1 to 3 for each computer on your network. Make sure you maintain an active Internet connection on your host computer as you proceed through this process. geekgirl.tip If you don't have a CD-ROM drive on one of the network computers, you can run the Network Setup Wizard from a floppy disk: While running the Network Setup Wizard on the ICS host computer, select the option to copy the Network Setup Wizard to a floppy disk. Once you've completed setup on the ICS host, take the floppy to the next computer and insert it in the drive. Double-click My Computer. Double-click 3½ Floppy (A:). Double-click netsetup.exe. The quickie XP network If you want a really easy networking experience and you have the hardware to support it, consider clean installing Windows XP on two or more computers. First install your network hardware (network interface cards, cabling, et cetera), then perform a new installation of Windows XP. During installation, XP will sense your hardware setup, ask for a name for each computer, and then ask which type of setup you wish to create. Select Typical Settings For A Default Network Configuration. That's it. Provided your hardware is XP-compatible, XP will create a LAN using the workgroup name MSHOME. Using your network Once you have your network up and running, you can easily access other computers on the network via My Network Places (click Start -> My Network Places). The Task Pane in My Network Places lets you access computers on your network and adjust settings. The Task Pane in My Network Places lets you view your network connections and view each of the computers in your workgroup (the workgroup consists of all computers on a network which share the same workgroup name ? by default, XP gives all computers on your home network the workgroup name MSHOME, although you can change this if you wish). When you initially open My Network Places, you'll see icons for the Shared Files folder of each of the active network computers. Sharing a printer With your home network installed, your PC suddenly gains all the advantages of the other PC's on the network. If you've been lusting after your sister's colour photo printer, you can now print directly to it from your own machine. Provided, that is, your sister decides to share her printer. (You might offer to let her share your laser printer in return as an inducement ? sharing works both ways.) To share a printer, on the computer which is directly connected to the printer: Click Start -> Control Panel -> Printers And Other Hardware -> Printers And Faxes. (Note: These steps will be a little different if you're sharing a printer on a PC running a version of Windows other than XP. For example, under Windows Me, you click Start -> Settings -> Printers.) Click the printer you wish to share. Click Share This Printer in the Task Pane. In the printer's Properties dialog, click the Sharing tab. Click Share Name and OK. Make a printer accessible to others on the network by sharing it. Once a printer has been shared you can access it from other computers on the network. To do so: Click Start -> Control Panel -> Printers And Other Hardware. Click Add A Printer. In the Add New Printer wizard, when asked whether the printer is a local or network printer, select the latter. In the next screen, select the option to Browse For A Printer and click Next. Select the appropriate printer from the list and continue with the wizard. Sharing files and folders Sharing a folder is even easier than sharing a printer: Open a folder (such as My Documents), click Make A New Folder in the Task Pane and name your new folder. With the new folder highlighted, click Share This Folder. In the Sharing tab of the Properties dialog box, select Share This Folder On The Network. Provide a descriptive name for the folder. This name should make it easy for others on the network to recognise the folder; it doesn't have to be the same as the folder name you selected in step 1. You can let other people on the network view and edit your files or view them only. If you want to protect your files from tampering, remove the tick from Allow Other Users To Change My Files. There are a variety of ways to access a shared folder. Here's one way: Click Start -> My Network Places -> View Workgroup Computers. Click the computer whose files you wish to access and then click the shared folder. You can create shortcuts to shared folders to make them easier to gdfgf

Sep 08, 2007 | Computers & Internet

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