Question about Konica Minolta Cameras

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Lost lense The front lense on this camera popped out and we lost it,now we can not zoom in it is all distorted.Is there something we can do?

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 155 Answers

SOURCE: zooming of Nikon D40 SLR Camera

You need to be more specific about which lens you've got! I'm guessing you've probably got the 18-55mm which is the most popular lens to be supplied with the kits.

From what you describe, the lens is working correctly. The problem is the maximum focal length of the lens (55mm) is not going to give you massive magnification. (Basically, the bigger the number, the more powerful the zoom.)

The sort of lenses that you can snoop on someone from half a mile away are going to be 300mm upwards.

This is one of the reasons that you can change the lens on an SLR camera. Now you might ask, if that's the case, why they don't make a 18-500mm lens. The problem is that the bigger the range of the zoom, the more the image quality suffers, so you tend to find the zoom lenses go up in a number of steps.

If you need more magnification, the only answer is to buy a more powerful lens I'm afraid :-(

Hope this helps,

Matt

Posted on Mar 21, 2008

Agent Allan
  • 480 Answers

SOURCE: I dropped my EOS Digital

Dear catnip54,
You could obviously clean the front and back elements on the lens(use a microfiber lens cleaning cloth), but there is no way of cleaning the inside of a SLR zoom lens other than having an authorized service technician take it apart and clean each lens element seperately(which could be expensive). I would count myself very lucky that your camera body still works after being immersed in water.

Sincerely,
Agent Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

Posted on Apr 18, 2008

  • 11967 Answers

SOURCE: Hello my barely used fujifilm fine pix J38 camera zoom error mess

Fixing a Lens Error on a Digital Camera

This has to be THE most common failure mode for a digital camera. Some common error messages that might show up on the LCD's of cameras with this problem include “E18 lens error”, or “lens error, restart camera”. Some cameras might show nothing at all, but merely make a beeping noise as the lens goes out, then in, then the camera shuts off. Sometimes the lens won't even move.
The problem is actually quite common throughout all camera brands. Usually it's sand or grit interfering with the lens extension mechanism. Or the camera's been dropped with the lens extended. Or the camera has been powered on, but the lens had been blocked preventing its extension. Or the battery ran down with the lens extended. Believe it or not, one BIG contributor to lens errors is using a camera case. Sand, gunk, case fibers, etc... accumulate at the bottom of the case. These materials love to cling to the camera by electrostatic build-up from the camera rubbing against the side of the case (especially those cases with soft fibrous intreriors). Once these materials work their way into the lens mechanism, that's all she wrote. I have many Canon's, and NEVER use a case for this very reason.
A camera owner that suffers this problem may have no recourse for having the camera repaired. Many camera makers will not honor repairing this problem under warranty as they claim it is due to impact damage to the camera, or sand or debris getting into the lens gearing mechanism (neither of which is covered under warranty). The quoted repair cost is usually close to or more than what the camera is actually worth.
Fortunately, about half the cameras that suffer this failure can easily be fixed by one of the following methods. None of these methods involve opening the camera, although some have potential to cause other damage to the camera if excessively done. If the camera is still under warranty, before trying any of these, please please first contact your camera's maker to see if they'll cover the repair, or to determine how much they'll charge for the repair. Who knows, you might get lucky. But if they quote you a number that's higher than the value of your camera, you may want to consider the following methods.
The methods are listed in the order of risk of damaging your camera. Thus make sure you try them in the listed order. And remember, these fixes (especially #6 and 7) should only be considered for a camera that's out of warranty, who's cost of repair would be excessive, and would otherwise be considered for disposal if unrepaired:
Fix #1: Remove the batteries from the camera, wait a few minutes. Put a fresh set of batteries back in (preferably rechargeable NiMH 2500mah or better) and turn the camera on. If that didn't work, try pressing and holding the Function or OK button while turning the camera on.
Fix #2: Remove the batteries, then remove the memory card. Then install new batteries, and turn on the camera. If you get an Error E30, it means you don't have a memory card installed, so turn it off, slip in the memory card and turn it on one last time.
Fix #3: Insert the cameras Audio/Video (AV) cable, and turn the camera on. Inserting this cable ensures that the camera's LCD screen remains off during the start process. Thus extra battery power is available to the camera's lens motor during startup. This extra power can be useful in overcoming grit or sand particals that may be jamming the lens. If the AV cable doesn't fix the lens error by itself, consider keeping this cable installed while trying fixes 4, 5, and 7 as a means to provide extra help to these fixes. But note that I DON'T recommend keeping the cable installed during Fix 6 as you may damage the AV port while tapping the camera. Reinsert the cable only AFTER tapping the camera.
Fix #4: Place the camera flat on its back on a table, pointed at the ceiling. Press and hold the shutter button down, and at the same time press the power-on button. The idea is that the camera will try to autofocus while the lens is extending, hopefully seating the lens barrel guide pins in their slots.
Fix #5: Blow compressed air in the gaps around the lens barrels with the idea of blowing out any sand or grit that may be in there jamming the lens. Other variations include blowing with a hair dryer in “no heat” setting, or sucking the gaps with a vacuum (careful with this one).
Now we're entering into the realm of potentially damaging your camera in conducting the fix. There is definitely some risk here, so take care when conducting the following two fixes.
Fix #6: Repeatedly tap the padded/rubber usb cover on a hard surface with the intent of dislodging any particles that may be jamming the lens. Other variations include hitting a side of the camera against the palm of your hand. A lot of people have reported success with this method. HOWEVER, there is also some potential for damaging or dislodging internal components with this method, such as unseating ribbon cables, or cracking LCD screens.
Fix #7: Try forcing the lens. More people have reported success with this method than with any of the other methods. HOWEVER, there's obviously some potential for damaging your camera by using this method. Variations include gently pulling, rotating, and/or twisting the lens barrel while hitting the power button. Attempt to gently straighten or align the barrel if it's crooked or twisted. Another variation includes looking for uneven gaps around the lens barrel, and then pushing on the side of the lens barrel that has the largest gap (note pushing the lens barrel all the way in is NOT recommended as it may become stuck there). While doing any of the above, listen for a click that indicates that the lens barrel guide pins may have reseated in their guide slots. If you hear this click, immediately stop and try the camera.

Posted on May 03, 2010

  • 11967 Answers

SOURCE: zoom lenses dont close

Fixing a Lens Error on a Digital Camera

This has to be THE most common failure mode for a digital camera. Some common error messages that might show up on the LCD's of cameras with this problem include “E18 lens error”, or “lens error, restart camera”. Some cameras might show nothing at all, but merely make a beeping noise as the lens goes out, then in, then the camera shuts off. Sometimes the lens won't even move.
The problem is actually quite common throughout all camera brands. Usually it's sand or grit interfering with the lens extension mechanism. Or the camera's been dropped with the lens extended. Or the camera has been powered on, but the lens had been blocked preventing its extension. Or the battery ran down with the lens extended. Believe it or not, one BIG contributor to lens errors is using a camera case. Sand, gunk, case fibers, etc... accumulate at the bottom of the case. These materials love to cling to the camera by electrostatic build-up from the camera rubbing against the side of the case (especially those cases with soft fibrous intreriors). Once these materials work their way into the lens mechanism, that's all she wrote. I have many Canon's, and NEVER use a case for this very reason.
A camera owner that suffers this problem may have no recourse for having the camera repaired. Many camera makers will not honor repairing this problem under warranty as they claim it is due to impact damage to the camera, or sand or debris getting into the lens gearing mechanism (neither of which is covered under warranty). The quoted repair cost is usually close to or more than what the camera is actually worth.
Fortunately, about half the cameras that suffer this failure can easily be fixed by one of the following methods. None of these methods involve opening the camera, although some have potential to cause other damage to the camera if excessively done. If the camera is still under warranty, before trying any of these, please please first contact your camera's maker to see if they'll cover the repair, or to determine how much they'll charge for the repair. Who knows, you might get lucky. But if they quote you a number that's higher than the value of your camera, you may want to consider the following methods.
The methods are listed in the order of risk of damaging your camera. Thus make sure you try them in the listed order. And remember, these fixes (especially #6 and 7) should only be considered for a camera that's out of warranty, who's cost of repair would be excessive, and would otherwise be considered for disposal if unrepaired:
Fix #1: Remove the batteries from the camera, wait a few minutes. Put a fresh set of batteries back in (preferably rechargeable NiMH 2500mah or better) and turn the camera on. If that didn't work, try pressing and holding the Function or OK button while turning the camera on.
Fix #2: Remove the batteries, then remove the memory card. Then install new batteries, and turn on the camera. If you get an Error E30, it means you don't have a memory card installed, so turn it off, slip in the memory card and turn it on one last time.
Fix #3: Insert the cameras Audio/Video (AV) cable, and turn the camera on. Inserting this cable ensures that the camera's LCD screen remains off during the start process. Thus extra battery power is available to the camera's lens motor during startup. This extra power can be useful in overcoming grit or sand particals that may be jamming the lens. If the AV cable doesn't fix the lens error by itself, consider keeping this cable installed while trying fixes 4, 5, and 7 as a means to provide extra help to these fixes. But note that I DON'T recommend keeping the cable installed during Fix 6 as you may damage the AV port while tapping the camera. Reinsert the cable only AFTER tapping the camera.
Fix #4: Place the camera flat on its back on a table, pointed at the ceiling. Press and hold the shutter button down, and at the same time press the power-on button. The idea is that the camera will try to autofocus while the lens is extending, hopefully seating the lens barrel guide pins in their slots.
Fix #5: Blow compressed air in the gaps around the lens barrels with the idea of blowing out any sand or grit that may be in there jamming the lens. Other variations include blowing with a hair dryer in “no heat” setting, or sucking the gaps with a vacuum (careful with this one).
Now we're entering into the realm of potentially damaging your camera in conducting the fix. There is definitely some risk here, so take care when conducting the following two fixes.
Fix #6: Repeatedly tap the padded/rubber usb cover on a hard surface with the intent of dislodging any particles that may be jamming the lens. Other variations include hitting a side of the camera against the palm of your hand. A lot of people have reported success with this method. HOWEVER, there is also some potential for damaging or dislodging internal components with this method, such as unseating ribbon cables, or cracking LCD screens.
Fix #7: Try forcing the lens. More people have reported success with this method than with any of the other methods. HOWEVER, there's obviously some potential for damaging your camera by using this method. Variations include gently pulling, rotating, and/or twisting the lens barrel while hitting the power button. Attempt to gently straighten or align the barrel if it's crooked or twisted. Another variation includes looking for uneven gaps around the lens barrel, and then pushing on the side of the lens barrel that has the largest gap (note pushing the lens barrel all the way in is NOT recommended as it may become stuck there). While doing any of the above, listen for a click that indicates that the lens barrel guide pins may have reseated in their guide slots. If you hear this click, immediately stop and try the camera.

Posted on Jul 25, 2010

lock123
  • 6831 Answers

SOURCE: when i turn my fujifilm

Hello

The problem is that the lens has become stuck in the barrel after dropping it. There are some DIY solutions you could try, but the probability is that you will have to get it fixed by a professional.

Use these at own risk as it may further damage the camera.

Firstly , try connecting your ac adapter or usb cable.

Try holding the shutter button while switching on the camera.

Look at the lens , and if some of the lens 'circles' is misaligned or not concentric then try wiggling it (while holding camera lens down).

Try gently pushing or pulling the lens when it extends but this is risky as it may cause the lens barrel to slip out of its guidance system.

Another way to do this is to place the camera lens down on a hard surface and then power it up. Be sure to use a soft cloth or something similar as to not scratch your lens or casing. Let the lens push the camera up and down a few times and sometimes the little resistance provided by the camera is enough to get things going again.

Try hitting your camera near the lens on the body with the soft tissue on the palm of your hand.

Other than that , I would take the camera to a repair center for a evaluation to see if it would cost more to repair than to replace the camera.

If it is still under warranty I would suggest you take it in before trying any of these steps and remove any off-brand batteries or accessories as some stores are really fussy about warranty repairs on camera's with non-brand accessories.

Hope the advise is useful.

Regards
Andrea

Posted on Aug 29, 2010

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Why am I getting pictures with curved edges edges


Hi Ian
What you are suffering is something called barrel distortion which causes images to appear spherised or "inflated". Barrel distortion is associated with wide angle lenses and typically occurs at the wide end of a zoom lens. The use of converters often amplifies the effect. It is most visible in images with perfectly straight lines, especially when they are close to the edge of the image frame

the way to solve it is to try not use the end of the of the zoom of your lens. Above 20 mm you should be fine. If this is not possible then you can correct the effect in programmes like Photoshop

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Yikes... I have to say, yikes, since my camera has just recently has the same issue. It's a lense issue. The service men said a lense isnt something to joke around with or try to have just "anyone" to look at. This isnt something you can just fix on your own. You need to notify the manufacturer regarding the OEM manufacturer of the lense. Or, get their information on who to have inspect it. Typically, its something broken, and very small that is articulate and impossible to fix on your own, otherwise there is something off with the focus on the lense..or its creating this issue. Again, dont mess with it it will only make it worse when you hear that grinding sound, trust me..I messed with mine and made it worse then it could have been...

Oct 03, 2007 | Video Cameras

Tip

Digital Cameras


Since I have been a expert on Fix ya, I have seen many people write about the auto-focus of the digital zoom lens. Here are a few tips and tricks that will help you in the future.

The Right Lens for the Job
There is another reason for using zoom lenses, especially when you are taking pictures of people. Lenses can alter the appearance of your subject, and wide angle lenses can distort people’s faces – especially if you are taking our advice and getting in close. So, by all means, get close, but if you are doing a portrait, use your zoom as well. Longer lenses are more complimentary and should be used even if you are actually physically close to your subject

What Brand is your SLR?
This is important because every mounting brace for all the camera's are different for example, and Nikon will not fight on a Canon, Canon will not fit on a Pentax and so forth. Some may fit, but the auto focus will not work. So make sure you know your brand and model number before just going out and buying a lens for your camera.

Here are six steps to help you buy the best lens for your money and the camera.
  1. Determine the focal length you'll need
  2. Decide if you want a prime or zoom lens
  3. Select a maximum aperture
  4. Choose between first or third party lenses
  5. Evaluate any extra features
  6. Read reviews and narrow your options

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If it is loose on the camera mount, try to avoid using it. If it causes your camera mount to distort, then you won't have much luck with any other lenses!
If it is "loose" meaning: it rattles and there's a bit of play in the 'barrel'...yuuup - get used to it. She's an oldie but a goodie.

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something wrong with your lenses. it is loose.
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Can i change my lens to other lenses like fish eye, wide angle or macro lens or even zoom lens?


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Again to answer your original question no you can't change the lens on your camera

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1 Answer

What size lens do i need for this camera?


You just need any Minolta AF mount lens. Sony Alpha lenses also physically fit as Sony inherited the Minolta lens mount when they bought the company, but as they are a later development not all will be electronically compatible.

The size of the lens depends upon the focal length of the lens and you choose that according to how wide a field of view you desire. Typical lenses are 28 and 35mm wide angles, 50mm "standard" (approximately the same perspective of how the human eyeball sees images), 70 to 90mm short telephoto lenses (a narrower perspective and very good for portraits) and higher numbers are narrower perspective telephoto lenses for viewing increasingly distant objects. In practice, the available lenses will be incorporated into zoom lenses which incorporate a seamless range of focal lengths within one single model. The word "zoom" reflects the fact that you can seamlessly change from say 28mm wide angle through to 80mm short telephoto and every single setting between them

Any zoom which starts at less than 50mm and finishes in the short telephoto range is called a standard zoom and is the lens that most autofocus cameras were supplied with. The next most common size will be something like a 70-200mm which is a telephoto zoom (or tele zoom) and takes you from a portrait lens to a genuine 5x magnification telephoto. You may also find so-called "super zooms" which do the whole job on one, for example 28-200mm. but the more jobs a single lens tries to do, the bigger and bulkier it becomes and the image quality deteriorates due to poorer contrast and greater image distortion at each end of the zoom range.

This is not an exhaustive answer, as there are entire books on the subject, but hopefully it's been of help to you.

Please take a moment to rate my answer or to add a comment if my answer has left you with unanswered questions which need to be resolved before you can rate my reply.

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Any Minolta AF mount lens will fit. 28mm is a standard wide angle, 50mm is a standard lens with a field of view approximately the same as the human eye, 80mm is a slight telephoto and for distant subjects 200mm is a long telephoto. Some lenses combine a few into one, they're called zoom lenses and will typically be something like 35-70mm, or 70-200mm. The measurements relate to the focal length of the lens, but generally the larger the number the longer the lens sticks out at the front. Zoom lenses are bulkier and heavier than fixed focal length lenses, but they're also the most commonly used types these days.

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