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Gas dryer intermittently heats.

Pulled front panel, watched ignition cylcle, successful. Very short metal exhaust duct (2 feet in length). Checked outside flow, excellent flow and heat. After a little time, heat stopped. Doesn't always fire. New ignitor last year. Is problem likely fixed with solenoids, or can faulty automatic dry feature sensor assembly in drum have an impact? During initial test mentioned above, dryer was empty, but still fired up.

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Most likely solenoids after a few firings they tend to open up and not work again until after cool down replace both they usually come in a kit

Posted on Sep 14, 2008

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Dryer vent duct


The vent pipe codes are based on the fact that the blower in a typical gas dryer can only 'push' a certain volume of air through a certain sized duct for a certain number of feet. Reduced volume of airflow means higher temperatures thus higher risk of fire.
First option ... is your dryer anywhere near a side wall, which would allow you to shorten the total length of duct required to reach the outside to something less than the 14 ft code limit ?
Second option ... upsize the standard 4" dryer exhaust duct to 6" to compensate for the 30ft length
Either way, in the absence of an external forced draft booster fan ( a.k.a. 'power vent' fan ) you should be using metal exhaust duct not plastic.

Jul 28, 2013 | Whirlpool Dryers

2 Answers

Just purchased the above dryer. There is NO Power in the machine. Have checked the electrical cords and power right to the machine than nothing.


  • Measure the amount of distance between your dryer and your venting exit point. This is how many feet of duct to buy. Note how many turns the duct will need to make, and purchase that number of 90-degree fittings. Remember that your venting exit point must be at least 1 foot above ground level, and that your path shouldn't be longer than 25 feet, with 5 feet subtracted for every 90-degree turn.
  • Drill a hole through the wall in the area you'll install the vent. This step is to test for obstructions. Look for the hole outside, and check for obstructions there, too.
  • Bore a 4¼-inch diameter hole into your designated and tested venting exit point, using your bi-metal hole saw on your drill. Start the hole outside of the house. Brace the drill against your leg to help keep it steady, and pull it out frequently to avoid overheating the tool.
  • Install your vent's cap by screwing it over the hole you just drilled. Caulk around any gaps.
  • Cut away excess length from a straight section of duct using your tin snips. Construct the entire length of your duct by snapping the seams together. Start at the dryer. Attach one end of your duct work to your dryer's exhaust point, which is at the back of the dryer. The pieces should fit together snugly.
  • cover the seams between your 90-degree fittings and your straight lengths with metal foil tape. Connect the last piece of metal duct to the cap you installed earlier. Every 5 feet, attach the metal duct work to the wall using metal pipe straps and screws.
  • Plug in your dryer and turn it on to test your work.


  • Dec 20, 2010 | Dryers

    1 Answer

    Gas will not ignite


    No heat If your dryer doesn't heat, check these: Igniter Gas valve coils Thermal fuse Igniter Modern gas dryers use an electric igniter to ignite the gas from the gas valve. When it's working properly, the igniter glows bright orange. When it burns out, the dryer tumbles but there's no heat because the gas can't ignite. When the igniter burns out, you need to replace it. If the igniter is held by a tension bracket, you very well may need to replace the bracket too. The igniter is inside the dryer housing, near the bottom front, usually in a cone-shaped metal tube (the force cone). It's about 2 inches long. It's mounted to the far end of the burner tube, and it has two wires attached to it--or to the tension bracket, if there is one. Gas valve coils Watch the igniter. Does it glow bright orange, then shut off without igniting the gas? (When the gas ignites there's a large blue flame.) If so, there may be defective coils on the gas valve. Mounted on the top of modern gas valves, there are black electrical coils. The coils, when energized, open the gas valve. If one or more of the coils are defective, the valve doesn't open and the gas cannot ignite. Because it's often difficult to properly test the coils, it's usually best to replace both (all) of them at the same time. Thermal fuse On many dryers, there's a thermal fuse (a heat-sensitive fuse that blows if the dryer overheats) mounted to the exhaust duct inside the back cover panel. The fuse is about an inch long. It's usually embedded in black resin and mounted in a white plastic housing. If the fuse has blown, it has no continuity. When this happens, your dryer either just stops heating, or it doesn't work at all. Be sure to inspect the venting/heating system before replacing the fuse to put the dryer back into operation. (You can't re-set this type of fuse.)

    Dec 31, 2009 | Kenmore 74112 Gas Dryer

    2 Answers

    The dryer runs, but there is no heat. Gas is


    If your dryer doesn't heat, check these:

    Igniter
    Gas valve coils
    Thermal fuse
    Igniter Modern gas dryers use an electric igniter to ignite the gas from the gas valve. When it's working properly, the igniter glows bright orange. When it burns out, the dryer tumbles but there's no heat because the gas can't ignite. When the igniter burns out, you need to replace it. If the igniter is held by a tension bracket, you very well may need to replace the bracket too.

    The igniter is inside the dryer housing, near the bottom front, usually in a cone-shaped metal tube (the force cone). It's about 2 inches long. It's mounted to the far end of the burner tube, and it has two wires attached to it--or to the tension bracket, if there is one.

    Gas valve coils Watch the igniter. Does it glow bright orange, then shut off without igniting the gas? (When the gas ignites there's a large blue flame.) If so, there may be defective coils on the gas valve. Mounted on the top of modern gas valves, there are black electrical coils. The coils, when energized, open the gas valve. If one or more of the coils are defective, the valve doesn't open and the gas cannot ignite. Because it's often difficult to properly test the coils, it's usually best to replace both (all) of them at the same time.

    Thermal fuse On many dryers, there's a thermal fuse (a heat-sensitive fuse that blows if the dryer overheats) mounted to the exhaust duct inside the back cover panel. The fuse is about an inch long. It's usually embedded in black resin and mounted in a white plastic housing.

    Aug 20, 2009 | Kenmore 700 6972 Dryer

    1 Answer

    Dryer does not heat-does not ignite


    If your dryer doesn't heat, check these:

    Igniter
    Gas valve coils
    Thermal fuse
    Igniter Modern gas dryers use an electric igniter to ignite the gas from the gas valve. When it's working properly, the igniter glows bright orange. When it burns out, the dryer tumbles but there's no heat because the gas can't ignite. When the igniter burns out, you need to replace it. If the igniter is held by a tension bracket, you very well may need to replace the bracket too.

    The igniter is inside the dryer housing, near the bottom front, usually in a cone-shaped metal tube (the force cone). It's about 2 inches long. It's mounted to the far end of the burner tube, and it has two wires attached to it--or to the tension bracket, if there is one.

    Gas valve coils Watch the igniter. Does it glow bright orange, then shut off without igniting the gas? (When the gas ignites there's a large blue flame.) If so, there may be defective coils on the gas valve. Mounted on the top of modern gas valves, there are black electrical coils. The coils, when energized, open the gas valve. If one or more of the coils are defective, the valve doesn't open and the gas cannot ignite. Because it's often difficult to properly test the coils, it's usually best to replace both (all) of them at the same time.

    Thermal fuse On many dryers, there's a thermal fuse (a heat-sensitive fuse that blows if the dryer overheats) mounted to the exhaust duct inside the back cover panel. The fuse is about an inch long. It's usually embedded in black resin and mounted in a white plastic housing.

    Aug 02, 2009 | Dryers

    1 Answer

    Have initial flame startup, but after it cycles off first time, flame does not come back on. My clothes aren't getting dry.


    Firstly, make sure your vent is unobstructed from the dryer to the outside vent hood.
    Check the vent hood itself to make sure it has not been crushed. Venting should be cleaned/inspected twice a year and kept to a minimum length without 90 degree elbows or pinched tubing.

    The most common failure are the gas valve coils, but read on from an excerpt at; www.repairclinic.com

    If your dryer doesn't heat, check these:

    Igniter
    Gas valve coils
    Thermal fuse
    Igniter Modern gas dryers use an electric igniter to ignite the gas from the gas valve. When it's working properly, the igniter glows bright orange. When it burns out, the dryer tumbles but there's no heat because the gas can't ignite. When the igniter burns out, you need to replace it. If the igniter is held by a tension bracket, you very well may need to replace the bracket too.

    The igniter is inside the dryer housing, near the bottom front, usually in a cone-shaped metal tube (the force cone). It's about 2 inches long. It's mounted to the far end of the burner tube, and it has two wires attached to it--or to the tension bracket, if there is one.

    Gas valve coils Watch the igniter. Does it glow bright orange, then shut off without igniting the gas? (When the gas ignites there's a large blue flame.) If so, there may be defective coils on the gas valve. Mounted on the top of modern gas valves, there are black electrical coils. The coils, when energized, open the gas valve. If one or more of the coils are defective, the valve doesn't open and the gas cannot ignite. Because it's often difficult to properly test the coils, it's usually best to replace both (all) of them at the same time.

    Thermal fuse On many dryers, there's a thermal fuse (a heat-sensitive fuse that blows if the dryer overheats) mounted to the exhaust duct inside the back cover panel. The fuse is about an inch long. It's usually embedded in black resin and mounted in a white plastic housing.

    If the fuse has blown, it has no continuity. When this happens, your dryer either just stops heating, or it doesn't work at all. Be sure to inspect the venting/heating system before replacing the fuse to put the dryer back into operation. (You can't re-set this type of fuse.)

    Jul 08, 2009 | Maytag Dryers

    2 Answers

    Kenmore 80 Series gas dryer starts with heat but very short time


    Hello Friend, Your problem is very simple to fix. You're dryer needs a gas valve coil kit. To replace coils just remove front of dryer body and look below drum you will see the gas valve. The valve coils are located on top of valve (two little round black cylinders). It's simple, just remove the two screws from the little metal bracket that holds them down, unplug the wires from them and just lift them straight up off of the valve. Take notice that one has 3 wires and one has 2 wires. Just replace with new coils and plug wires back in and re-fasten metal bracket. Your dryer will run like new. Happy to help, Tim.

    Jun 23, 2009 | Kenmore Dryers

    1 Answer

    No heat in dryer


    If your dryer doesn't heat, check these:
    Igniter Modern gas dryers use an electric igniter to ignite the gas from the gas valve. When it's working properly, the igniter glows bright orange. When it burns out, the dryer tumbles but there's no heat because the gas can't ignite. When the igniter burns out, you need to replace it. If the igniter is held by a tension bracket, you very well may need to replace the bracket too.

    The igniter is inside the dryer housing, near the bottom front, usually in a cone-shaped metal tube (the force cone). It's about 2 inches long. It's mounted to the far end of the burner tube, and it has two wires attached to it--or to the tension bracket, if there is one.

    Gas valve coils Watch the igniter. Does it glow bright orange, then shut off without igniting the gas? (When the gas ignites there's a large blue flame.) If so, there may be defective coils on the gas valve. Mounted on the top of modern gas valves, there are black electrical coils. The coils, when energized, open the gas valve. If one or more of the coils are defective, the valve doesn't open and the gas cannot ignite. Because it's often difficult to properly test the coils, it's usually best to replace both (all) of them at the same time.

    Thermal fuse On many dryers, there's a thermal fuse (a heat-sensitive fuse that blows if the dryer overheats) mounted to the exhaust duct inside the back cover panel. The fuse is about an inch long. It's usually embedded in black resin and mounted in a white plastic housing.

    If the fuse has blown, it has no continuity. When this happens, your dryer either just stops heating, or it doesn't work at all. Be sure to inspect the venting/heating system before replacing the fuse to put the dryer back into operation. (You can't re-set this type of fuse.)

    May 11, 2009 | Dryers

    1 Answer

    Dryer working but no heat


    If it does not heat , and you already checked the burner and the ignitor, then it is probably the thermal fuse at the back of the appliance.

    See the following suggestions from Repairclinic:

    No heat If your dryer doesn't heat, check these:

    Igniter
    Gas valve coils
    Thermal fuse
    Igniter Modern gas dryers use an electric igniter to ignite the gas from the gas valve. When it's working properly, the igniter glows bright orange. When it burns out, the dryer tumbles but there's no heat because the gas can't ignite. When the igniter burns out, you need to replace it. If the igniter is held by a tension bracket, you very well may need to replace the bracket too.

    The igniter is inside the dryer housing, near the bottom front, usually in a cone-shaped metal tube (the force cone). It's about 2 inches long. It's mounted to the far end of the burner tube, and it has two wires attached to it--or to the tension bracket, if there is one.

    Gas valve coils Watch the igniter. Does it glow bright orange, then shut off without igniting the gas? (When the gas ignites there's a large blue flame.) If so, there may be defective coils on the gas valve. Mounted on the top of modern gas valves, there are black electrical coils. The coils, when energized, open the gas valve. If one or more of the coils are defective, the valve doesn't open and the gas cannot ignite. Because it's often difficult to properly test the coils, it's usually best to replace both (all) of them at the same time.

    Thermal fuse On many dryers, there's a thermal fuse (a heat-sensitive fuse that blows if the dryer overheats) mounted to the exhaust duct inside the back cover panel. The fuse is about an inch long. It's usually embedded in black resin and mounted in a white plastic housing.

    If the fuse has blown, it has no continuity. When this happens, your dryer either just stops heating, or it doesn't work at all. Be sure to inspect the venting/heating system before replacing the fuse to put the dryer back into operation. (You can't re-set this type of fuse.)

    Oct 09, 2008 | Dryers

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