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I have a 5 yr old Magnavox and an outside antenna. I get excellent reception now. When I connect to the dtv box as directed instead of a menu on channel 4 it tells me to adjust antenna (we have) because there is no signal. What should I do?

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Even though I continued to get the "no signal" message I clicked on the menu button on the remote and got a menu and was able to go from there.

Posted on Sep 13, 2008

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Trying to hook up converter box to Westinghouse flat screen the converter is magnavox sdtv. I get autoscan but no channels are found. I do not have an antennae. Do I need one? Help!


If ur tv a LCD tv it is a digital tv.U do not require a Digital converter box to get the new DTV free air signal broadcasting tv channels stations.But u do require a good digital antenna for it to recieve a long an strong signals to recieve a DTV free air broadcasting tv channels stations.

Dec 07, 2010 | Philips Magnavox 50ML8105D 50" HDTV DLP TV

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Im not getting any signal weak or strong! What am I doing wrong?


What's your source for signal? You need an antenna to be the capture source for your signal that has a wire going from the antenna to the INPUT of the box. That's usually coaxial input. The box is the middle component between your TV and antenna.

Apr 26, 2009 | Philips Magnavox 50ML8105D 50" HDTV DLP TV

2 Answers

Do I need a converter?


go to menu
send the tv to autoprogram
if your HD channels are available in your tv. Then you dont need a converter box.

Apr 14, 2009 | Projection Televisions

1 Answer

After installing the DTV converter box, reception was dropped for most of the stations i received pre-box. now i have added a new antenna. and, i can't get anything through the converter box. connections...


If you have the box connected to the TV using an RF cable to the TV's antenna input, make sure the TV is on channel 3. You should at least see the boxes menu display when the power is on. Try channel 4 if you see nothing on 3. Every box I've hooked up has been on channel 3 by default, but who knows?

If you can, hook the box to the TV using direct video and audio connections, and make sure the TV is set to the correct input.

Unless the box you bought has "RF pass-through" (and if you got your box using a government coupon, it's a sure bet it doesn't) you will notice a marked drop in quality if you try to watch regular broadcasting with the box connected. I've been installing these with a bypass arrangement so people can still watch their analog broadcasts until they go off the air in February.

If the box does in fact have no display when you turn it on and your TV is on the correct channel, your box is defective and should be returned and replaced.

Dec 06, 2008 | Projection Televisions

5 Answers

I have a digital TV with an outside antenna and rotor.I rcv analog channels w/o any problem.I can rcv channel 19.1 on my TV and on my old TV with a converter box. I have gone to antennaweb.com to get the...


the frequency catcher of the antenna may be weaker then required.to receive the digital channels u can attach a network booster which will solve the problem.

Dec 04, 2008 | Projection Televisions

1 Answer

DTV connection


Have you tried http://www.antennaweb.org/aw/Address.aspx? This will show you the location of the HD broadcast towers for your local stations and my recommendation would be to use an outdoor antenna if you can. Picking up the reception is definitely about pointing the antenna in the direction of the towers.

Nov 10, 2008 | Projection Televisions

1 Answer

I installed an Insignia converter box, Model # NS DXA1, and it worked fine. I did not realize it would decrease the size of my screen, so I disconnected it and figured I would try again later. I have...


Ok, you have 2 issues:
1) Consult the manual page 8 for setting the 'type' of TV either 4:3 (Standard) Aspect Ratio or 16:9 (Widescreen) Aspect Ratio. Then the Picture Size for 'each individual station' can be Selected via the button on your remote in the upper right hand corner. It's labeled "ZOOM". As you push the button, it will rotate through the size types available. If you have an older standard TV (4:3) and want to fill the entire screen, then select 'CROPPED' for every channel(my preference). You will only see a center cut of the entire picture and will lose some picture on either side, but most of the action will remain in the center of the screen. If you select "SET BY PROGRAM" then some programs will appear in their actual Aspect Ratio so some will be in 16:9 and some in 4:3. More and more programming will end up being 16:9(the new DTV/HDTV Standard). Set this to your liking.

2) This is going to take a bit of explaining:
Depending where you live geographically, whether in a home or an appartment, and the Type of Antenna you are using, your reception problems may be affected by a combination of these. The FCC was not completely forthcoming in letting the public know that the best way to get DTV signals(and Analog) is with an Outdoor Antenna and that indoor Antennas may be useless. Plus most of the 'fancy HDTV touted" Indoor antennas are various degrees of bad when it comes to VHF reception. The new system they(FCC) selected has lowered significantly the power at which TV stations broadcast. So most people using Indoor Antennas may not get all of their favorite channels even with the best of indoor antennas and doing everything right with the 'placement' of that antenna. The same goes for and Outdoor Antenna. Just because you have a premium outdoor antenna and it has worked perfectly for the last 10yrs.(of more) with Analog TV, DOES NOT MEAN THAT it will work perfect with DTV for a few reasons:
1) DTV Signals, because of their lower power, require very deliberate placement of an antenna. Just pointing it in the right direction is not enough. DTV signal reception is a bit like 'Swiss Cheese' meaning if your are getting poor results and think that rotation will fix it, you may be wrong. If you are in the 'hole' and rotate, you are still in the hole. Sometimes moving your antenna a couple feet laterally can make a huge difference.
Why? Because the direct DTV signals coming from the TV stations are in the Kilowatt range (analog was usually more than a million watts!) They have now become more sensitive to interference from the back and sides of your antenna. Some sources of interference can be a reflection of the same signal off of a nearby tower or building which cancel some of the direct signal resulting in low or no signal. FM Radio transmissions, an Analog TV station from Canada(they don't go digital until 2010) operating on the same channel as your favorite Channel's new channel assignment can inject so much noise that your tuner cannot process it. Remember, runnig through just about every neighborhood are many other Wireless/Microwave Services: Phone, Internet, TV, Paging Systems, etc.. These, too can ave some affect.
So by moving your antenna to a position that I refer to as the "Sweet Spot", you are allowing your antenna to get more of the direct signal and 'de-tune' the unwanted signals from the back and sides.
Why did the channels you found before not show up the next time? Well, based on your current antenna's position and the signal strength its receiving from those stations, the level may have dropped off due to some of the above. Every DTV and Converter Box has a 'lower signal level cut-off point', meaning it needs so much signal before it cuts off. Because DTV either gives you a perfect picture or its gone, the old method of looking at picture quality to make sure your antenna was placed correctly is not valid. So the maker of the Converter Boxes put "Signal Strength Meters" in every box. Get to know where this is. It is your new best friend and is the only way you can be guided when placing your antenna. It can usually be accessed by pressing a button on the remote labeled :"SIGNAL or METER" and sometimes "DISPLAY or INFO". Some Boxes, like many DTV Sets, require you to go into the menu settings to locate this feature. Usually the sinal strength is indicated by a RED, YELLOW & GREEN scale and may have a % indication. To have reliable pictures, you should be above 60% or in the GREEN Zone. If you are only getting less than 60% or Yellow Zone, you may see the picture break-up into little squares or 'Pixelate' as it is known. If you are in the RED Zone or less than 30% your Box or DTV will not lock and give a "NO or LOW" signal indication. It is normal to see the meter indication 'hunt' or move up and down a bit due to atmosheric conditions and the swaying of the TV station's Towers.
Gee, Can you tell that I explain this often? Yea, I work for a TV Station in Cleveland. This switch has generated more than 700 phone calls all of which I attempt to call back on a daily basis. The public needs to be re-educated on this new system and how to make it work for them. Every installation is unique. In many cases, it will require the help of a qualified TV Antenna specialist to find the "Sweet Spot". Those of you in Apartment buildings, and anyone that may be a shut-in or senior with limited help or finances, my heart goes out to you.
Hope this helps!

Sep 09, 2008 | Projection Televisions

1 Answer

TV won't work with rabbit ears


You must change the input on the system to be AIR/Antenna , the way it was before was set to cable/dish/DTV.
The tv sees the input different.

Jun 05, 2008 | Philips Magnavox 51MP392H Rear Projection...

2 Answers

How to install DTV Digital to Analog Converter


Your outside antenna connects to the input of the d/a converter box then the output goes to your tv...1.2.3.... If your on cable you do not need a converter box.

May 08, 2008 | Projection Televisions

1 Answer

I bought a 32" conia tv and i cant get good reception! i have bought a amplified antenna and a hd set top box and still no good reception. my other tv's in the smae spot have had no reception issues....


well it's the same as the days of old, the antenna has a range of reception. the further the sations antenna, the lager your antenna must be. just because you bought an amplified antenna does not mean you will receive the deep fringe station. also the antenna must be UHF and VHF to receive the broadcast in digital. most of the braodcasters have gone with the UHF band because it is more stable for the bandwith of digital broadcast. the UHF band is very directional as well, so you must be pointing to the broadcasters antenna. no set top antenna will work if you are further than 15 miles of the broadcasters antenna. the roof top UHF/VHF antenna with a preamp is the way to go. I have tested every compact antenna and unless you live in the city that the broadcast generates you will get no reception with these. terks are junk, and any small amplified antenna does not work if you are in low lying areas. roof top, roof top,.....ROOF TOP!!!!!

Apr 24, 2008 | Projection Televisions

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