Question about Philips VR630 VHS VCR

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VCR eats the tape

VCR is playing fine and suddenly stop. When I try to eject the videotape it makes a funny noise (like is stretching the tape) and the videotape comes out of the vcr but the tape stay attached to the inside. To take the videotape out, I need to cut it.

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  • Anonymous Mar 26, 2014

    Used would be OK

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Sometimes cleaning the pinch roller can help but over time the rubber just gets old and dry rots. The belts loose elastisity and slip. The pinch roller (black tire looking wheel)can sometimes be cleaned with thinner and it will grip again and help pull the tape back in hte cassette

Posted on Apr 13, 2006

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You have a bad take-up reel clutch or a belt on the bottom of the player mechanism that is causing this trouble.

Posted on Apr 12, 2006

  • Larry  Dillon
    Larry Dillon Apr 12, 2006

    oops almost forgot that in rare cases a intermittant mode switch can cause this problem

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1 Answer

Samsung DVD-V3650 Combo Player ejects most videotapes without playing them


You can only compensate for minor scratches. As for the vcr side the rollers could be dirty or the brake worn out. The tensioner may be too sensitive as well. Basically the mechanism probably needs servicing.

Sep 06, 2016 | Samsung DVD-V3650 DVD Player/VCR

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How a VCR and Videotape Work and the Most Common Problems


A common complaint about videotape is that over time, playback becomes unstable and often deteriorates to the point that the tape becomes unplayable or that the tape works on one VCR, but not another. All of these problems can be traced to tape path alignment in the VCR and damage to the tape itself. I will address each issue separately.
First you need to understand a little about the tape media. When you record on VHS videotape, the recorder lays down three (four for stereo sound) magnetic tracks on the ½ inch wide tape. Analog audio is recorded along the top edge as a thin horizontal stripe (or parallel stripes for stereo) for the entire length of the recording. In the center of the tape, video is recorded as diagonal parallel stripes by two or four heads that rotate on a drum at 360 RPM. On the bottom edge (the most vulnerable place for damage to occur) there is another horizontal track that is critical to playback. It is the sync track and it's purpose is provide the VCR with the feedback it requires to maintain the tape speed within extremely tight parameters. If the tape does not move at a precise speed, the picture and sound can become unstable to the point that it will be unusable.
As you record, a fixed frequency sine wave is recorded on the sync track. If during recording, the tape speed increases or decreases, it will be reflected on the sync track. During playback, the VCR's circuitry senses the small millisecond-to-millisecond speed fluctuations of the tape movement over the heads and adjusts the speed so the tape speed always matches the speed at which it was recorded. If the sync track is ever damaged, your tape can become useless.
Unfortunately, videotape is a very delicate media. It is easily damaged and once damaged, it usually cannot be repaired. The most common failure is due to tape stretch. Videotape is not very elastic. Anything more then slight tension during use can stretch the tape to the point that it cannot rebound. If the sync track is stretched, the recorded frequency will change and the VCR will react accordingly by making incorrect speed corrections resulting in picture and sound disruptions. Your recorder has tensioning arms that control tape tension as it moves through the system. If the tension in the tape path is incorrectly adjusted, the tape will be damaged as it is recorded or played.
Improper storage is the other common cause of edge damage. If you lay your cassettes flat for prolonged periods, the weight of the tape above will press against the sync track and can damage it. Always store your tapes vertically. Extremes in temperature and humidity can cause stretch. Store tapes in a cool dry place. Also, periodically restack your tapes. To restack a tape, put it in your recorder and fast-forward it to the end and back to the beginning. That will redistribute the tension on the tape. After playing a tape, always restack it once or twice. I have a large collection; over 1,000 tapes. I cannot restack them all on a regular basis. But when I play them, I take that as an opportunity to restack them.
Now that you understand some basics about the media, I will now turn you attention to your VCR. As I hope you are starting to understand, proper playback requires precise alignment of many moving elements. The two broad categories are tape path alignment and head alignment. None of this is a do it yourself job. In addition to specialized electronic test equipment, VCR alignment requires specialized tools along with expensive custom made for the brand and model alignment jigs along with (again expensive) alignment tapes. The alignment tape is important beyond the obvious. In order for a tape recorded on one machine to play properly on another, the two machines must have matching alignment. VCR manufacturers record their own alignment tapes using precisely and frequently aligned recorders. The tapes are used to align a specified number of VCRs and then discarded because each time a tape is used it wares. Since there is a uniform standard for these tapes, a tape recorded on one brand of VCR should play on another. That is the theory.
Now for the real world; the consistent interchangeability we all wish for is hard to maintain. Consider this. The tolerances that must be maintained at every point in all of the processes relative to VCRs and tapes are very close to what is possible; little room for slight variations. Since the tolerance for one part of the process may accumulate with another part of the process either mathematically positively or negatively, it is often the case that each individual part of the chain is within tolerance, but the sum total is out of tolerance.
What in plane language does this all mean? Two alignment tapes made on the same machine will be different. Tapes from different manufactures will be different. The tape you local technician or factory service center uses will have inconsistencies. The net effect is that two seemingly properly aligned machines may not be able to properly play each other's tapes.
I do not mean to suggest that you should not have your VCR properly aligned and maintained by a professional. My point is that videotape is an old technology with flaws that could not fully be overcome in the time frame that it would have been profitable for manufacturers to do so. That is why we have moved on to digital technologies. My advice is to enjoy your videotapes while you can. They will not last forever. If you have important tapes, transfer them to digital media to protect your memories as soon as possible.

on Jul 03, 2015 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

The VHS ate a tape, no power,wont eject, can't get it to work.


Are you asking how to get the tape back? Partial disassembly of the case (UNPLUGGED) would allow removal of the tape.
If you are asking how to repair a VCR, no one can tell you how to do that on a forum. VCRs have quite a number of moving parts, mostly driven by rubber belts. These stretch with time and the mechanisms quit working. Since a simple belt replacement costs as much as a cheap DVD player most people change to DVD at this point.
If you have high-personal-value videotapes (home movies) , these can be converted to DVDs by any local photo service and would last a long time in the new format. They will NOT copy commecial videotapes for you.

Jan 02, 2010 | Toshiba MW27F51 27 in. TV/VCR/DVD Combo

1 Answer

Eating my vcr tapes


ok , lets start with MOISTURE where VCR located ,what happen is that moisture can cause the tape to catch on the polished surface of the drum head , some instances will play,but the tape stops stretching it and damage occurs. SECOND check for a defective idler tire that prevent the take up reel from spinning. also check for any drive belts ( look like black rubber bands ) that might be stretched with time ,replace with new ones .hope this info helps

Apr 15, 2008 | Zenith VRB420 VHS VCR

1 Answer

Tape stuck in VCR, won't eject.


you posted 2 different problems here...
to answer this one ". The tape is stuck, won't eject and I'd like to get it out without damaging the VCR unit."...open unit, find motor that moves tape ejector and spin that motor by hand (power off)

the other problem, "the VCR will not insert a tape. It keeps rejecting it."...open unit and fully turn ejection motor until home position is reached...this is a home sensor switch not being activated.

Feb 04, 2008 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

VCR repeatedly tries to play and eject when tape deck is empty


the tape carriage is probably stuck, or something stuck inside blocking the tape sensor.
feed a tape in and see if it does it "with" the tape too

hope this helps

Jan 08, 2008 | Sylvania 6313CB 13 in. TV/VCR Combo

1 Answer

VCR stops, ejects, eats tapes


clean the heads and retime the gears.

Nov 24, 2007 | Symphonic WF802

1 Answer

Vcr eating and/or ejects tape


Tape heads should be cleaned first and gears lubricated. This job can be done at home if you purchase lithium grease and are very careful not to get it on the heads or spools. Greasing should only be done if you are confident in opening it up. Otherwise, seek a cheap professional. 

Oct 26, 2007 | Philips Magnavox MWR20V6 DVD Recorder/VCR

2 Answers

Eating tapes and then refuses to work


try opening the case. then, using your fingers, roll the gear that drives the tape eject mechanism until a full tape eject limit is reached. power up and try

Nov 16, 2006 | Symphonic SL260A S-VHS VCR

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