Question about Philips VR630 VHS VCR

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VCR eats the tape

VCR is playing fine and suddenly stop. When I try to eject the videotape it makes a funny noise (like is stretching the tape) and the videotape comes out of the vcr but the tape stay attached to the inside. To take the videotape out, I need to cut it.

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Re: VCR eats the tape

Sometimes cleaning the pinch roller can help but over time the rubber just gets old and dry rots. The belts loose elastisity and slip. The pinch roller (black tire looking wheel)can sometimes be cleaned with thinner and it will grip again and help pull the tape back in hte cassette

Posted on Apr 13, 2006

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Re: VCR eats the tape

You have a bad take-up reel clutch or a belt on the bottom of the player mechanism that is causing this trouble.

Posted on Apr 12, 2006

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VCR won't record, just ejects tape

You have not mentioned the make and model number of the vcr. Any way the problem is due to end sensor or related circuit. End sensors are photo diods which you can check the shorting with a multy meter.

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1. Check to see if a tape is jammed inside (see 284 Extract a Jammed Videotape).
2. Try changing the video input and/or output source. Many VCRs have two ways to receive and send a video signal (coaxial and video direct). If that works, try changing the cable for the other method to see whether you need a new cable.
3. Clean tape heads (see How to Clean VCR Heads).
4. Open VCR and inspect any belts that are accessible (see 284 Extract a Jammed Videotape). A drive belt may be broken or loose.

If tapes are getting stuck / enmeshed inside the machine, itis 90% probability) a mechanical problem. Change the Belts, clean all rollers, idlers, and braking pads.
I would suggest that you also replace the Capstan Pinch Roller.


Feb 17, 2008 | Rio Go Video DDV9556 Dual Deck VCR


How a VCR and Videotape Work and the Most Common Problems

A common complaint about videotape is that over time, playback becomes unstable and often deteriorates to the point that the tape becomes unplayable or that the tape works on one VCR, but not another. All of these problems can be traced to tape path alignment in the VCR and damage to the tape itself. I will address each issue separately.
First you need to understand a little about the tape media. When you record on VHS videotape, the recorder lays down three (four for stereo sound) magnetic tracks on the ½ inch wide tape. Analog audio is recorded along the top edge as a thin horizontal stripe (or parallel stripes for stereo) for the entire length of the recording. In the center of the tape, video is recorded as diagonal parallel stripes by two or four heads that rotate on a drum at 360 RPM. On the bottom edge (the most vulnerable place for damage to occur) there is another horizontal track that is critical to playback. It is the sync track and it's purpose is provide the VCR with the feedback it requires to maintain the tape speed within extremely tight parameters. If the tape does not move at a precise speed, the picture and sound can become unstable to the point that it will be unusable.
As you record, a fixed frequency sine wave is recorded on the sync track. If during recording, the tape speed increases or decreases, it will be reflected on the sync track. During playback, the VCR's circuitry senses the small millisecond-to-millisecond speed fluctuations of the tape movement over the heads and adjusts the speed so the tape speed always matches the speed at which it was recorded. If the sync track is ever damaged, your tape can become useless.
Unfortunately, videotape is a very delicate media. It is easily damaged and once damaged, it usually cannot be repaired. The most common failure is due to tape stretch. Videotape is not very elastic. Anything more then slight tension during use can stretch the tape to the point that it cannot rebound. If the sync track is stretched, the recorded frequency will change and the VCR will react accordingly by making incorrect speed corrections resulting in picture and sound disruptions. Your recorder has tensioning arms that control tape tension as it moves through the system. If the tension in the tape path is incorrectly adjusted, the tape will be damaged as it is recorded or played.
Improper storage is the other common cause of edge damage. If you lay your cassettes flat for prolonged periods, the weight of the tape above will press against the sync track and can damage it. Always store your tapes vertically. Extremes in temperature and humidity can cause stretch. Store tapes in a cool dry place. Also, periodically restack your tapes. To restack a tape, put it in your recorder and fast-forward it to the end and back to the beginning. That will redistribute the tension on the tape. After playing a tape, always restack it once or twice. I have a large collection; over 1,000 tapes. I cannot restack them all on a regular basis. But when I play them, I take that as an opportunity to restack them.
Now that you understand some basics about the media, I will now turn you attention to your VCR. As I hope you are starting to understand, proper playback requires precise alignment of many moving elements. The two broad categories are tape path alignment and head alignment. None of this is a do it yourself job. In addition to specialized electronic test equipment, VCR alignment requires specialized tools along with expensive custom made for the brand and model alignment jigs along with (again expensive) alignment tapes. The alignment tape is important beyond the obvious. In order for a tape recorded on one machine to play properly on another, the two machines must have matching alignment. VCR manufacturers record their own alignment tapes using precisely and frequently aligned recorders. The tapes are used to align a specified number of VCRs and then discarded because each time a tape is used it wares. Since there is a uniform standard for these tapes, a tape recorded on one brand of VCR should play on another. That is the theory.
Now for the real world; the consistent interchangeability we all wish for is hard to maintain. Consider this. The tolerances that must be maintained at every point in all of the processes relative to VCRs and tapes are very close to what is possible; little room for slight variations. Since the tolerance for one part of the process may accumulate with another part of the process either mathematically positively or negatively, it is often the case that each individual part of the chain is within tolerance, but the sum total is out of tolerance.
What in plane language does this all mean? Two alignment tapes made on the same machine will be different. Tapes from different manufactures will be different. The tape you local technician or factory service center uses will have inconsistencies. The net effect is that two seemingly properly aligned machines may not be able to properly play each other's tapes.
I do not mean to suggest that you should not have your VCR properly aligned and maintained by a professional. My point is that videotape is an old technology with flaws that could not fully be overcome in the time frame that it would have been profitable for manufacturers to do so. That is why we have moved on to digital technologies. My advice is to enjoy your videotapes while you can. They will not last forever. If you have important tapes, transfer them to digital media to protect your memories as soon as possible.

on Jul 03, 2015 | VCRs

1 Answer

VCR Model Panasonic NV-J45:- Until just yesterday, it worked fine, only last night I tried to play a tape, the green auto-tracking light flashed a few times as usual, then the tape just kept stopping, no...

The problem is caused by the idler assembly which controls play, record, rewind, and fast forward. If the take up reel stops, the vcr senses a problem and will stop the tape. The only other thing it can be is the drive belt, sometimes it will stretch and fall off or break. I suggest a tv technician or somebody that knows their way around a machine.

Jan 14, 2011 | Panasonic PV-9451 VHS VCR

1 Answer

I have a HR-J625EA JVC VCR & video cannot be ejected.

this sounds like a sensor problem the vcr thinks the tape has been ejected and then turns off! this will cost more to fix then a new VCR!

Dec 08, 2008 | JVC HR-S9800 S-VHS VCR

1 Answer

Eating my vcr tapes

ok , lets start with MOISTURE where VCR located ,what happen is that moisture can cause the tape to catch on the polished surface of the drum head , some instances will play,but the tape stops stretching it and damage occurs. SECOND check for a defective idler tire that prevent the take up reel from spinning. also check for any drive belts ( look like black rubber bands ) that might be stretched with time ,replace with new ones .hope this info helps

Apr 15, 2008 | Zenith VRB420 VHS VCR

1 Answer

Tape stuck in VCR, won't eject.

you posted 2 different problems here...
to answer this one ". The tape is stuck, won't eject and I'd like to get it out without damaging the VCR unit." unit, find motor that moves tape ejector and spin that motor by hand (power off)

the other problem, "the VCR will not insert a tape. It keeps rejecting it." unit and fully turn ejection motor until home position is reached...this is a home sensor switch not being activated.

Feb 04, 2008 | VCRs

1 Answer

Sony SLV-775HF

Hi, Sounds like a mechanical problem in the tape path which can be anything from the pinch roller, take up spool, foreign object (such as splicing tape lodged somewhere), brake or others. An indicator would be stretch tape. One way to check if the tape is being stretch is to rewind partially one of the tapes you have tried, eject it and open the flap/cover of the cartridge. There is a stub on one of the side of the tape that you have to push to open it and see the actual tape. Stretching if any would be clearly visible. Am afraid that you would need the services of a qualified technician for the actual repair not unless you are familiar with video tape mechanism. On the video head, offhand, I doubt if it needs replacement.Of course an on site technician would be in a far better position to diagnose it for you. Hope this be of some help and pls post again how things turn up. Good luck and kind regards.

Aug 01, 2007 | Sony SLV-775HF VCR

2 Answers

VCR eats tape when rewinding

A couple of possibilities: 1. Braking problems: When VCR goes from FFWD, REW, Play to stop, there are a pair of "brake pads" engaged to stop the reels, and prevent tape spillage out into the machine. These pads, often rubber like, are on levers which contact one side of each reel. If you take the cover off the VCR, and look down where the tape is loaded, you will like see these brake assemblies. If the rubber pad is missing, or lever pivot points gummied up, then this is your issue. 2. Take up reel isn't being engaged to take up the tape on tape eject. When a tape is loaded into the machine, tape is pulled from the cartridge and threaded into play ready position. When eject mode is engaged, the tape must be pulled back into the cartridge, or you will have tape hanging out the front end of the cartridge, and may get caught on the VCR internals, or at least be mangled by the cartridge door. The often issue here is likely the idler assembly pivot point is sticky. This idler pivots, moving from the take-up reel (right reel) to the supply reel reel (left one), depending on what mode is selected. FFWD & play to the right, left for REW. If this idler is gummed up at it's pivot point, movement will be sluggish at best, and might not be engaging the right reel quickly enough to pull tape in before tape eject. This idler is sitting right between the reels down where the tape sits. A little light oil on the pivot point may be enough to loosen it up. Otherwise it might need to be removed and the old grease removed, and a drop or two of light oil applied.

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