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Ubutntu Troubleshooting Problems

What is the process of troubleshooting problems in Ubuntu? Is there a software that can help me?

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The best way to troubleshooting problem in Ubuntu is to write down the error and then search for it on google. you can also use ubuntu forum and ask questions there to get help, they should be glad to help you. other thing is to ask in IRC channels to get your problem solved.

good luck, and good luck with ubuntu its a good choice.

Posted on Sep 15, 2008

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Troubleshoot problems in Windows 7


If some part of Windows 7 is behaving strangely, and you don't know why, then click Control Panel > Find and fix problems (or 'Troubleshooting') to access the new troubleshooting packs. These are simple wizards that will resolve common problems, check your settings, clean up your system and more.

on Dec 11, 2009 | Operating Systems

1 Answer

How to install Ubuntu on Raid5


Here is a great page on installing Ubuntu on RAID5: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/SoftwareRAID?action=fullsearch&context=180&value=Convert+to+software+raid&titlesearch=Titles

The thing you need to remember is to have the latest Ubuntu server version installed and also as is mentioned in the instructions, you need to consider the sizes of your partitions, as well as where you decide to place the boot partition.
The actual install is pretty straight forward, so you will be stepped through the process and asked these questions, once you begin the install. Hope this helps.

Mar 22, 2011 | Operating Systems

1 Answer

I want to install ubuntu and Mandiva, my question how to Install both operating systems? Thanks


The answer is yes, and no.
Both Mandriva and Ubuntu are Linux based and they do have
similarities and differences. The differences in how things run
may cause you problems, so the easy answer is no. There are
similarities that can be shared, and in this case, you have a
yes.

Since you mention XP and Ubuntu halves above, I'll assume you
have your harddrive split in only 2 partitions, perhaps or
preferably 3 partitions, such as.
hda1 = C: = XP ntfs (maybe 15 to 40 GB in size)
hda5 = extended partion which holds Ubuntu and swap
hda6 = = Ubuntu (maybe 4 GB or bigger and includes home)
hda7 = swap (approximately 2x the size of your RAM)

First, we begin by describing your hard drive geometry.
When IBM compatible PC computers came into existence, the hard
drives had definitions allowing the harddrive to be divided into
4 separate partitions. 1 of the 4, could be allocated as
an "extended" partition which could be divided further into many
more partitions. In the past, this allowed you to have 4
distinctly different operating systems on your harddrive, or 3
distinctly different operating systems and an extended partition
for extended drives, so in the past, it was possible to have
combinations such as DOS, Win95, OS2, and shared extended drives.
There were additional limitations, but based on you
describing "halves", your computer does not have the 1024
cylinder problem of long-ago and you are running a more modern
computer with a modern BIOS.

XP does want to be the 1st operating system on the 1st
enabled "primary" partition, so let us leave that as it is since
linux is more flexible and can be put on the extended partitions.

From a linux perspective, the primary reserved definitions would
be 1,2,3,4 (XP will me located in one of these 1..4) and the
extended partitions are 5 to define the partition, then
6,7,8,9.... (your Ubuntu will be located on one of these 6...).

Due to some very old software having had problems in the past,
you will want try to keep within the boundaries of 6,7,8,9 to
avoid problems (unless you are an expert at troubleshooting).
In linux, you may note that your hard drive is described as hda
or perhaps sda and a number.
If you type at the command line fdisk /dev/hda and then
choose "p" for partition definitions it should describe how your
hard drive is partitioned right now. Press "q" to exit.

I'll assume you do not know about moving and remounting
directories, so we'll go the easy way with more steps but less
chance of problems.

If you have not done anything particularly important on your
Ubuntu worth saving yet and don't mind reinstalling it, I would
recommend putting the /home in a separate partition which you can
share between Ubuntu and Mandriva, and also a separate /swap
partition that can also be shared. If you need to keep certain
things, then make a backup of what you want to keep and put those
aside to restore later. This is better done now before you
install Mandriva. We want to avoid some complicated moves later.

I prefer to backup my machine before causing some major changes
such as these, it is strongly recommended you find a method to
backup your computer at the hard drive "image" level so you can
recover from a disaster if something goes wrong. this may help if
you have another computer available with sufficient hard drive
space. Substitute windows "share" instead of Samba if the other
computer is windows based.
http://www.joescat.com/backup/disk_image.html
If the above does not work for you, just make sure you make a
backup you can recover from one way or another.

With your Ubuntu install CDrom divide and install your Ubuntu
somewhat like this (partition #s and sizes may vary)
hda1 = C: = XP ntfs (maybe 15 to 40 GB in size)
hda5 = extended partion which holds Ubuntu and swap
hda6 = home = Ubuntu (to share with Mandriva, make it
sufficiently large)
hda7 = = Ubuntu (maybe 4 GB or bigger, does not have home)
hda8 = empty partition (same size as hda7 - not defined)
hda9 = swap (approximately 2x the size of your RAM)

I recommend in the order above since you should rarely if ever
need to use /swap (so it is at the very end of your harddrive),
and your /home is next to your XP C: partition, which allows you
to change and modify everything in between your /home and /swap
without having to modify your XP C: /home or /swap any more.

Next, get your Mandriva CDrom install disk, and begin installing
it, during install, you want to re-use the existing Ubuntu /home
and existing Ubunt /swap partitions, so you indicate during
install:
hda1 = C: = XP ntfs (maybe 15 to 40 GB in size)
hda5 = extended partion which holds Ubuntu and swap
hda6 = home = Mandriva (to share with Ubuntu)
hda7 = leave as undefined (it is your existing Ubuntu ""
hda8 = = Mandriva
hda9 = swap (approximately 2x the size of your RAM)

The values 1,6,7,8,9 may not be the same as they are assigned by
the partitioning tool, but the locations on the disk should be in
that order. Mandriva has resizing and partition moving options if
the partitions need to be re-sized, I think Ubuntu also includes
similar tools too. After finishing, run XP and do a command-line
chkdsk C: to make sure XP is happy with any changes you may have
made to XP's partition.

You should now have XP, Ubuntu and Mandriva with a shared /home
partition and a shared /swap partition. thanks

Mar 10, 2011 | Operating Systems

2 Answers

Iv installed ubuntu linux and have no clue


installing software in ubuntu is different than windows, so you may fall in problem.


watch the video on how to install softs on linux

thanks for using fixya.
give ratings and votes




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Installing a brothers DCP-165C printer


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Aug 02, 2009 | Canonical Ltd. Ubuntu

1 Answer

Ubuntu Windows Problems


It goes like this (to avoid pages of text in this post I'll just give you the link):
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/WindowsDualBoot
If you need any more help, please ask.

Sep 08, 2008 | Canonical Ltd. Ubuntu

1 Answer

Ubuntu Partition


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Aug 18, 2008 | Canonical Ltd. Ubuntu

2 Answers

Ubuntu Troubleshooting


One of the most common issues people have after getting their codecs installed into Ubuntu, is the sad discovery that Ubuntu won’t play Avi files from inside of your Firefox browser. Well, there is a fairly simple fix for this - lose GStreamer and switch to Xine.

You do this from Synaptic located from System, Administration in Ubuntu. In the search box for the application, just do a query for totem-xine. Once it comes up, select (double click) and then allow the uninstallation of totem-gstreamer. It’s simple!

Aug 05, 2008 | Canonical Ltd. Ubuntu

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