Question about Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

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Film speed override?

For some reason my N6006 will not read the DX coding on a cannister of infrared film I need to shoot for my photo class. How does one go about manually overriding the film speed so that I can use the light meter? I've looked on the internet and in the manual and I can't find anything.

thanks!

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Press and hold the ISO button on the top left and rotate the command dial on the right until the film speed appears on the display. Release the ISO button and the speed is set.

In case your instructor hasn't told you, IR light is just below visible light on the spectrum and has a longer wavelength. Therefore, IR light will focus behind the film plane for a given setting. I.e., if you preset the lens to focus at 10 feet, the IR light will focus at a shorter distance. Unless your lens has a distance mark for IR, I would limit my shooting to longer distances and smaller f-stops to use the depth-of -field to compensate. When you are in focus for IR, the image in your viewfinder will be out of focus. The closer you are to the subject, the more out of focus the image will appear at the correct focus setting.

Posted on Nov 28, 2008

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1 Answer

How do I set the ASA speed on this camera?


Cannot see where you included the camera name nor model. Still, many film SLR have do not have a way to set the ASA, it reads the film cartridge, DX Code, that tells the camera the ASA to use.

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needs repairing at a qualified shop

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Apr 21, 2013 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

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What speed film? Does the roll have the DX markings (the black-and-silver rectangles)? If it doesn't, what happens if you set the film speed manually?

Mar 22, 2013 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

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Will the autofocus works on N6006 if I put on a DX lens?


Yes, the autofocus should work. However you'll likely get vignetting on your photos because a DX lens is designed to cover a smaller area than a frame of 35mm film.

Jan 04, 2013 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

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Minolta maxxum 3000i, i need to know how to manually set the film speed when i am not using DX film


The camera doesn't have a way to do this. If you use non-DX film, or DX film out of the camera's range, the ISO is automatically set to 100.

If you need a manual, you can download one from
http://butkus.org/chinon/minolta/minolta_3000i/minolta_3000i.htm

The film speed is discussed on page 13.

Sorry if that wasn't the answer you wanted to see, but that's the way this camera works.

Sep 14, 2011 | Minolta Maxxum 3000i 35mm SLR Camera

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How can i change the ISO on my camera (minolta maxxum 3xi)? The film i put in is 400 but the assignment requires me to change it to 100


Okay. Just bear in mind that the exposure meter is going to be two stops off, unless you're getting the film pull-processed.

The Maxxum 3Xi unfortunately does not have a way of overriding the Camera Automatic Sensing portion of the DX encoding standard. That is, if the film cartridge has the DX encoding, the camera will set itself to the indicated speed.

However, if the film cartridge is NOT encoded, the camera will set itself to ISO 100. So, if you tape over the magnetic encoding on the cartridge...

The CAS is not the barcode on the film cartridge, but the rectangular patches of conductive and nonconductive material.

Take a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DX_encoding for more information about the DX encoding.

Jan 13, 2011 | Konica Minolta Maxxum 3Xi 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I have trouble taking indoor (low light) photos. pictures come out blury and the camera does not snap the picture properly i have a nikon 35 mm n6006 camera


Hi Rebecca--
The hardest thing about low light photography is balancing your available shutter speed to the amount of action you're trying to capture.
Here are a few things to try:
1) Try using a tripod. Steadying your camera during long exposures will greatly improve your image clarity.
2) Buy a faster film. You may need to increase your film's ISO setting. Try 400 to start, then go up from there. Remember, faster film always produces grainy images, and it usually costs a little more to process. If you're stuck with 100 ISO, you can always "push process" the film, where a given ISO is let to sit in its developer longer than usual--This will cost you more too!
3) Invest in a good flash system. Nikon has tons of hotshoe flash systems that rarely compromise the ambient light-mood of a given situation. Look for one that lets you aim the flash in different directions, and try to find one that will meter a light situation on its own.
4) Turn on the lights. If you're ok with losing some of the romance of an image, turn on some more lights to give you some more flexibility when making your exposure choices.
5) Open up your aperture. You may find that a lot less in depth of field will give you a lot more in image clarity and exposure flexibility. Shooting at f2.8 with only a birthday cake lighting your subject will grant you many more valuable shutter stops that shooting the same with f5.6.
Remember, Rebecca, if you're shooting handheld, you must do everything in your power to shoot with the quickest shutter speed available. This will cut down on the blurriness of your indoor images.
--Hope this helps.

Oct 06, 2010 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

How so I inaert film


I'm not familiar with your exact model so what follows is generic to many film SLR cameras and assumes that the camera is already empty:-

Open the back of the camera by pulling upwards the rewind crank on the top left hand end of the camera (as viewed from behind). The back of the camera should pop open a little, open it all the way.

Before fitting the film, check if the film can is DX coded. It will have DX printed on it somewhere if it is, but will also have a large area bare metal squares interspaced with printed black squares or rectangles. if the film is not DX coded then look for an ISO number, ASA number or DIN number and note it somewhere.

Drop the roll of film into the space at the left of the camera, and push the rewind crank back down to secure the film canister. Pull out the film leader across to the right hand end of the camera. Often there are printed instructions or diagrams showing what to do. Your camera probably has an easy loading system in which you pull the film leader until it's level with a printed line and then close the camera back until it clicks.

Turn the camera on, normally it will staert whirring as it autoloads the fil onto the take up spool. If successful the number one will appear in the film counter display within a few seconds. If not then open the camera back and try again.

What you do next depends on whether the film is DX coded or not. There will either be a dial or a menu item which allows you to set the film speed, for DX coded films set the control to DX or to AUTO. If the film is a rare non DX-coded one then you need to set the speed manually. Select the correct ISO number in the menu. If your film had an ASA number then use it as an ISO number and if it had a DIN number then look up DIN to ISO conversion online.

If this has solved your problem then please return the favour by rating my answer, thanks.

Jun 30, 2009 | Minolta Dynax 404Si Film Camera

1 Answer

'Err' & 'E"


Is the film loaded correctly? Have you tried reloading it? Also is it flashing DX too? That would mean the film speed is not DX coded so you need to set the film speed manually.

Sep 23, 2008 | Nikon N80 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Premature Film Rewinding


the only thing that I could think of when I read your situation is, that you might not be using a DX coated films. see, the camera reads the bar code on the film and maybe it is not the same program. check the camear manual and make sure you are using the same kind of the suggested film in the manual. good luck

Apr 11, 2007 | Nikon N65 35mm SLR Camera

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