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Central Air conditioner compressor keeps running

I turn on the Central A/C unit with the thermostat. The attic fan unit goes on and the system cools the house. When the system shuts down the fan unit shuts off but the outside compressor keeps running. The only way the outside compressor goes now off is when I flip the 240 switch on the main box. This just started. Is it a thermostat problem? Thanks.

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SOURCE: I turn on the Central

could be a thermostat problem but even more likely the contactor on the unit outside is stuck. In order to change this part you will have to get in to the outdoor unit. The contactor is the automatic switch that the thermostat energizes when the thermostat calls for aircond. The location of the contactor is in the outdoor unit (electrical section) and where the power will tie in to the unit. It is a little box looking part with terminals where most of the wiring connects. If the contacts are welded together the outside unit will not shut off. If you tempt to replace this part, make a diagram of all the wires connected to it before you take any of them off. Turn off all power to the outdoor unit before inspecting.

Posted on Apr 13, 2011

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2 Answers

York central unit condenser does not run. Red Led light on circuit board keeps blinking.


Hello,

There seem to be a problem with the unit that is why it is acting that way. If the air conditioner is not working but has the power light blinking. Yet the fan is not running, then you need to troubleshoot the unit. There are some tips for troubleshooting the air conditioner to be able to detect the problem and know the best appropriate procedure to solving the problem.

A few basic principles for air conditioner troubleshooting. For both central home air conditioner or window air conditioner, the first thing to check is whether the unit is getting proper power. If the unit uses 220 volt power be sure that the proper voltage is getting to the unit. Same for 110 volt units. A voltage meter can be used to assure that the voltage is correct.

For window air conditioning units the voltage can also be checked before and after the thermostat. If voltage is being supplied to the thermostat but not from it then the thermostat probably needs replaced. This is a fairly common problem. Another place to check is the fan motor voltage. The fan on window air conditioners runs both the indoor blower and the condenser fan. If that motor fails than the compressor may run for a short time, but will overheat and shut off. Continued operation like this will result in compressor failure. This motor can be economically replaced for larger window air conditioners, but for smaller ones the cost of replacement will be more than a new unit.

Central air conditioners for the home are more complex and there are more things that can go wrong. As with the window air conditioner the thermostat can also be a problem. The central air conditioner thermostat will only have 24 volts going to it. So don't look for high voltage there. Some units the voltage will be coming from the outdoor unit and others the voltage will be supplied by the indoor air handler or furnace. Most home central air conditioning will be supplied by the indoor air handler or the furnace. If the air conditioner is for cooling only the unit will usually have only two wires going to the condenser unit. Make sure that you have 24 volts across those wires.

The next thing to check will be the indoor blower. If your thermostat is calling for cooling then the indoor blower should be running. If there is no air moving across the indoor cooling coil then you will soon have a big block of ice formed on the coil. This can happen for a few reasons. The indoor blower is not working, the air flow is restricted and not allowing air to move across the coil. A clogged air filter would also do this. Or the outdoor condenser unit has lost the charge of refrigerant.

Finally and worst of all is when you have a complete compressor failure. Often when this happens the compressor will "lock up" or not be able to turn when power is supplied to it. Overheating or lack of lubrication are usually the main causes of compressor failure. Overheating can be caused by the outdoor coil around the compressor getting clogged with dirt, leaves, or grass. Loss of the refrigerant charge will also cause the compressor to overheat. It is the cool return gas coming back to the compressor that helps to keep it from overheating.

As you can see there are many things that can go wrong with an air conditioner and I have not come close to exhausting the possibilities here. I have just touched on the most common problems in a very basic way.

There are some basic trouble shooting things that can be done very easily. Most problems are above out of the range of comfort for many homeowners and professional help should be consulted before any attempt is made at repairs.

Good luck.

Jul 14, 2011 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

Haier air conditioner will not kick on to air conditioner mode, only the fan runs, but does not cool like air conditioner should cool, just blows as a fan.


A few basic principles for air conditioner troubleshooting. For both central home air conditioner or window air conditioner, the first thing to check is whether the unit is getting proper power. If the unit uses 220 volt power be sure that the proper voltage is getting to the unit. Same for 110 volt units. A voltage meter can be used to assure that the voltage is correct.

For window air conditioning units the voltage can also be checked before and after the thermostat. If voltage is being supplied to the thermostat but not from it then the thermostat probably needs replaced. This is a fairly common problem. Another place to check is the fan motor voltage. The fan on window air conditioners runs both the indoor blower and the condenser fan. If that motor fails than the compressor may run for a short time, but will overheat and shut off. Continued operation like this will result in compressor failure. This motor can be economically replaced for larger window air conditioners, but for smaller ones the cost of replacement will be more than a new unit.

Central air conditioners for the home are more complex and there are more things that can go wrong. As with the window air conditioner the thermostat can also be a problem. The central air conditioner thermostat will only have 24 volts going to it. So don't look for high voltage there. Some units the voltage will be coming from the outdoor unit and others the voltage will be supplied by the indoor air handler or furnace. Most home central air conditioning will be supplied by the indoor air handler or the furnace. If the air conditioner is for cooling only the unit will usually have only two wires going to the condenser unit. Make sure that you have 24 volts across those wires.

The next thing to check will be the indoor blower. If your thermostat is calling for cooling then the indoor blower should be running. If there is no air moving across the indoor cooling coil then you will soon have a big block of ice formed on the coil. This can happen for a few reasons. The indoor blower is not working, the air flow is restricted and not allowing air to move across the coil. A clogged air filter would also do this. Or the outdoor condenser unit has lost the charge of refrigerant.

Finally and worst of all is when you have a complete compressor failure. Often when this happens the compressor will "lock up" or not be able to turn when power is supplied to it. Overheating or lack of lubrication are usually the main causes of compressor failure. Overheating can be caused by the outdoor coil around the compressor getting clogged with dirt, leaves, or grass. Loss of the refrigerant charge will also cause the compressor to overheat. It is the cool return gas coming back to the compressor that helps to keep it from overheating.

As you can see there are many things that can go wrong with an air conditioner and I have not come close to exhausting the possibilities here. I have just touched on the most common problems in a very basic way.
There are some basic trouble shooting things that can be done very easily. Most problems are above out of the range of comfort for many homeowners and professional help should be consulted before any attempt is made at repairs. Remember also, that the release of refrigerant gases into the atmosphere is a federal offense in the
US. Proper care must always be taken to minimize the release of any gases. A license is also required to handle refrigerants. Make sure that the professional you call has the proper certifications to handle refrigerants properly.


http://www.fixya.com/support/r3636709-size_air_conditioner_need

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3623253-window_air_conditioners_clean_every_year

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3633369-portable_air_conditioning_great_portable

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3623166-heating_air_conditioning_scams

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3597468-you_can_add_air_conditioning_to_your_hot

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3583697-how_to_keep_house_cool_without_using_air

May 29, 2011 | Haier HWR08XC7 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

I turn on the Central A/C unit with the thermostat. The attic fan unit goes on and the system cools the house. When the system shuts down the fan unit shuts off but the outside compressor keeps running....


could be a thermostat problem but even more likely the contactor on the unit outside is stuck. In order to change this part you will have to get in to the outdoor unit. The contactor is the automatic switch that the thermostat energizes when the thermostat calls for aircond. The location of the contactor is in the outdoor unit (electrical section) and where the power will tie in to the unit. It is a little box looking part with terminals where most of the wiring connects. If the contacts are welded together the outside unit will not shut off. If you tempt to replace this part, make a diagram of all the wires connected to it before you take any of them off. Turn off all power to the outdoor unit before inspecting.

Apr 13, 2011 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

Air conditioner will not turn on by remote green light keeps flasing and fan on outside box not working


A few basic principles for air conditioner troubleshooting. For both central home air conditioner or window air conditioner, the first thing to check is whether the unit is getting proper power. If the unit uses 220 volt power be sure that the proper voltage is getting to the unit. Same for 110 volt units. A voltage meter can be used to assure that the voltage is correct.

For window air conditioning units the voltage can also be checked before and after the thermostat. If voltage is being supplied to the thermostat but not from it then the thermostat probably needs replaced. This is a fairly common problem. Another place to check is the fan motor voltage. The fan on window air conditioners runs both the indoor blower and the condenser fan. If that motor fails than the compressor may run for a short time, but will overheat and shut off. Continued operation like this will result in compressor failure. This motor can be economically replaced for larger window air conditioners, but for smaller ones the cost of replacement will be more than a new unit.

Central air conditioners for the home are more complex and there are more things that can go wrong. As with the window air conditioner the thermostat can also be a problem. The central air conditioner thermostat will only have 24 volts going to it. So don't look for high voltage there. Some units the voltage will be coming from the outdoor unit and others the voltage will be supplied by the indoor air handler or furnace. Most home central air conditioning will be supplied by the indoor air handler or the furnace. If the air conditioner is for cooling only the unit will usually have only two wires going to the condenser unit. Make sure that you have 24 volts across those wires.

The next thing to check will be the indoor blower. If your thermostat is calling for cooling then the indoor blower should be running. If there is no air moving across the indoor cooling coil then you will soon have a big block of ice formed on the coil. This can happen for a few reasons. The indoor blower is not working, the air flow is restricted and not allowing air to move across the coil. A clogged air filter would also do this. Or the outdoor condenser unit has lost the charge of refrigerant.

Finally and worst of all is when you have a complete compressor failure. Often when this happens the compressor will "lock up" or not be able to turn when power is supplied to it. Overheating or lack of lubrication are usually the main causes of compressor failure. Overheating can be caused by the outdoor coil around the compressor getting clogged with dirt, leaves, or grass. Loss of the refrigerant charge will also cause the compressor to overheat. It is the cool return gas coming back to the compressor that helps to keep it from overheating.

As you can see there are many things that can go wrong with an air conditioner and I have not come close to exhausting the possibilities here. I have just touched on the most common problems in a very basic way.
There are some basic trouble shooting things that can be done very easily. Most problems are above out of the range of comfort for many homeowners and professional help should be consulted before any attempt is made at repairs. Remember also, that the release of refrigerant gases into the atmosphere is a federal offense in the
US. Proper care must always be taken to minimize the release of any gases. A license is also required to handle refrigerants. Make sure that the professional you call has the proper certifications to handle refrigerants properly.


http://www.fixya.com/support/r3636709-size_air_conditioner_need

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3623253-window_air_conditioners_clean_every_year

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3633369-portable_air_conditioning_great_portable

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3623166-heating_air_conditioning_scams

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3597468-you_can_add_air_conditioning_to_your_hot

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3583697-how_to_keep_house_cool_without_using_air

Dec 15, 2010 | Carrier 36KCARMS Air Conditioner

1 Answer

My outside fan will not run and the inside unit runs constantly. can't push the reset button on unit outside


Your out door unit fan motor not runs due to pressure not build up at Heat mode. If its cool mode only fan runs with compressor when thermostat calls for it.

Without having technical knowledge, don't press any reset button. Hope it's helpful?

Dec 09, 2010 | Ruud Central System Air Conditioner

2 Answers

The outside unit is not working on my Heil Air conditioner


The attic fan is not a part of your a/c system, and you should not run it while you are running the a/c. If you are currently using the attic fan, it is possible that someone wired it so that the a/c won't turn on while the attic fan is on. Otherwise if the thermostat is set below room temp, and says it is calling for cool, then the problem is most likely coming from an issue at the outside unit itself. Make sure to check your fuses, at the fuse panel and outside breaker. Hope this helps

FYI.. the only part of the system that might use batteries is the thermostat.

Jul 28, 2009 | Air Conditioners

1 Answer

Central Air Conditioner


Turn the power to the indoor unit off. Remove the cover where the fan is. Feel the motor of the fan. If it is very hot the bearings have likely gone out. If the fan is cool to the touch I would call a service company because you likely have an electrical problem that will require some training to solve.

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Try changing out the start up and run capacitors for the compressor.

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1 Answer

The fan for my air conditioner will not turn. When we cut the system on it makes a humming sound and the light go dim for just a moment and this goes on repeatedly. No heat or air. We have a dual...


If the humming noise is coming from the attic it would indicate that the blower motor on the air handler is trying to start but the rotor is locked.

If the humming noise is coming from the outside unit and the fan runs but the compressor does not your compressor has a locked rotor.

If the blower motor is the problem the outside unit should still start as normal but you would have no cooling due to no air movement.

In ether case it sounds like you need to call a service tech to diagnose your system.

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3 Answers

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inside unit has fan control relay , either on control board or can be separate ,except for the 24 volt transformer and the t-stat the units operate separately concentrate totally on the inside unit this is where the problem lies

Oct 23, 2007 | Ruud UAMB Air Conditioner

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