Question about APC MasterSwitch Power Receptacle - Power distribution strip- 4 Output (ap95103202) UPS System

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What is a receptacle? - APC MasterSwitch Power Receptacle - Power distribution strip- 4 Output (ap95103202) UPS System

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When you plug something into a conventional duplex receptacle (the type that receives two appliance plugs), and the device doesn't work, trouble shooting the problem is fairly simple. For large receptacles that run on 220 to 240 volts, such as ranges and dryers and air conditioners, call an electrician unless you're well-versed in electrical repairs and safety issues. Always check when installing if the appliance is rated from 15 to 50 amps, 240 volts, and 20 to 50 amps, 120/240 volts. They have two hot wires (red and black) and a separate grounding wire. Receptacle basics Conventional duplex receptacles have two places to plug in electrical cords or devices. Each of those two places includes one narrow slot, one wide slot, and a semicircular hole. The narrow slot is the "hot" side, connected to the black wire of the electrical system. The wide slot is the "neutral" side, connected to the white wire. And the semicircular hole is the ground, connected to a bare or green wire or the electrical system's ground. Many electrical plugs have one wide blade and one narrow blade (and, in some cases, a ground plug) that match the receptacle's slots to insure that the circuit is properly connected to the electrical device. Wires may be attached to screws on each side of the receptacle or plugged into terminal holes in the back of the receptacle. Whether wires attached to screw terminals or are pushed into rear-mount terminals, the screw terminals on the sides of the receptacle are hot (charged) so don't touch them!

Posted on Jan 18, 2006

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1982 chevy wiring layout into fuse panel


Chevrolet 1977 And 1980 C and K Model Fuse Blocks

(The numbers, eg; "UF2" Cargo Area Lamp, are RPO numbers.)

  • A - Fuse - Traffic Hazard
  • B - Fuse - Tail, Stop Courtesy Lamps
  • C - Receptacle - TP2 /M40
  • D - Fuse - Radio & TCS
  • F - Receptacle - C91/UF2 (Cargo Area Lamp)/U35/U37
  • G - Fuse - Heater / Air Cond.
  • H - Receptacle - C62
  • I - Fuse - Accessory
  • J - Fuse - Panel Lights
  • K - Receptacle - NL2/A33/U16 (Tachometer)
  • M - Receptacle - Accessory Lamps
  • N - Not Used
  • O - Fuse - Reversing Lamps
  • P - Fuse - Instrument Cluster Feed
  • Sep 28, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

    Tip

    Wiring a GFIC alternative.


    When wiring a GFCI (Ground Fault Interrupter Circuit) receptacle you would normally connect the wire coming from the service panel or the hot wire to the LINE connection at the GFCI and then connect the other receptacles you wish to protect to the LOAD side on the GFCI. But let's say you have installed a GFCI in a garage circuit and want to run a wire to the garage door opener from that circuit without the garage door opener receptacle being protected by the GFCI but still want all other receptacles protected. Reason being that the garage door opener will trip the GFCI more often than not. You may also want to have a receptacle for a freezer in the garage. You do not want that freezer protected by the GFCI circuit as it may trip without your knowledge and cause all the food to spoil. Warning: Only install a single plug receptacle for the freezer and not a double plug receptacle. That way only one thing, the freezer, can be plugged into this receptacle as it is not GFCI protected. The way to avoid the breaker tripping is to connect the garage door opener & freezer receptacle to the LINE side of the GFCI. This way it is not protected by the GFCI and there is no danger of that receptacle loosing power due to a tripped breaker on the GFCI. When the GFCI trips power will still be available at any receptacle connected on the line side. On any GFCI you can connect two sets of wires to the LINE side. If you have more than two you will have to connect those together under a wire nut and then use a jumper wire to connect to the LINE on the GFCI. Look at the photo and you will see the 2 sets of holes to connect at the LINE side (Bottom) on the back of the GFCI receptacle. There are also 2 sets of holes to connect on the LOAD side (Upper). Of course you would use a wire nut and jumper to connect all the ground wires.8dd2149.png

    on Dec 13, 2009 | Electrical Supplies

    1 Answer

    Trying to wire switch and plug combination where the switch will turn off the plug


    Black wire to brass connection on switch. White wire to silver connector on receptacle. Add a wire from the silver side of switch to the brass side of the receptacle. When switch is on current flows through to it to receptacle then out white when something is connected to the receptacle.

    Nov 19, 2013 | Cooper Wiring Devices Combination Switch &...

    1 Answer

    Loose jack port can it be replaced


    Brian:

    No need to replace the jack port... If you look carefully at the side of the receptacle, there are threads on the outside periphery of the receptacle. A small nut threads on the receptacle and tightens down the receptacle (the "port").

    Mar 16, 2013 | Computers & Internet

    1 Answer

    My Holmes modelHCH 6001 won't start. The receptacle is hot so I think it has to do withthe product itself.


    It may, but it could also be a faulty receptacle depending on how old it is or the amperage draw from the heater may be to high. Especially, if you have another electric appliance plugged into the same receptacle. That's where you need to start troubleshooting. If the wiring and the receptacle is fine, then there is more than likely an electrical short in the heater or the cord from the heater to the receptacle.
    In the meantime, unplug the heater from the receptacle and let it cool while you do the troubleshooting. If you decide to remove the receptacle, be sure to turn the circuit breaker feeding that receptacle to OFF. Or you may have a shocking experience.

    Mar 18, 2011 | Holmes Products HCH6001 Heater

    1 Answer

    Replacing a receptacle


    As always when working with electricity, shut off the power. Use a circuit tester to make sure that the power is really off. Unscrew the receptacle's cover plate; be sure you get a replacement receptacle that's the correct type for your wiring?though most receptacles are standard, aluminum wiring should only be connected to receptacles designated CO-ALR. When installing the new receptacle, connect the black (hot) wire to the brass terminal screw, the white (neutral) wire to the silver screw, and the bare (ground) wire to the green ground screw. Unscrew the receptacle cover plate and unscrew the receptacle. Disconnect the wires from the terminals. Form a curl with a pair of needle-nose pliers so the wires hook clockwise around the screws, then tighten the terminal screws. Screw the receptacle to the box and add the cover plate.

    Jan 18, 2006 | APC MasterSwitch Power Receptacle - Power...

    1 Answer

    What is a GFCI Receptacle?


    A special type of receptacle called a GFCI (or GFI), short for ground-fault circuit interrupter, protects kitchen, bathroom, and outdoor receptacles in a home from the serious shock that can occur where electricity and water meet. Identified by the reset and test buttons located on its face, a GFCI will sense even a tiny short and will shut down itself and, in some cases, other receptacles on the same circuit. Just push the reset button to reset the receptacles. Push the test button periodically to insure that the device is working.

    Jan 18, 2006 | APC MasterSwitch Power Receptacle - Power...

    1 Answer

    Receptacles wired backwards


    "Reverse polarity" is the term used to describe the condition where electrical wires are connected to the wrong terminals of a receptacle; it's a common condition that can be hazardous if the "hot" side of your electrical system gets connected to certain types of lamps or equipment. It's common because it's an easy mistake to make when hooking up wires and because receptacles work fine even when the polarity is reversed. You generally don't know the condition exists unless you look for it. If you think you're home's wiring is a bit haphazard or may contain some conditions of reverse polarity, it's a good idea to check for it. You can buy a simple circuit tester for less than $20. Just plug it into all duplex receptacles; test both the top and bottom. If you discover reverse polarity: 1) Shut off the circuit breaker that serves that receptacle (the tester's lights will go out). 2) Unscrew the cover plate from the receptacle, and use a voltage tester to be sure none of the wires in the electrical box are still "hot." 3) Unscrew or release the wires from the receptacle and re-fasten them to the proper terminals--white to the silver (neutral terminal and black to the brass hot terminal. The bare or green wire should connect to the green screw. 4) Put the cover plate back on, turn the circuit back on, and test the receptacle again. Note: If the tester indicates reverse polarity but the wires are hooked up to the proper terminals, call an electrician.

    Jan 18, 2006 | APC MasterSwitch Power Receptacle - Power...

    2 Answers

    Receptacle Doesn't Work


    By far the most common problem with a receptacle is that it doesn?t work. Because receptacles are very inexpensive and easy to replace, it makes sense to replace them when they cease to work properly. But before you go to the trouble of buying a new one and installing it, make sure that the old one is truly defective. For a non-working duplex receptacle, first make sure the problem isn't with the appliance or lamp. Some appliances, such as hairdryers, have overload protectors that automatically shut them off if they begin to overheat. Try a second appliance or lamp in the receptacle. If the receptacle still doesn't work, you'll usually find that the circuit breaker has tripped or the fuse has blown, the receptacle has become faulty, or there is a switch that operates that receptacle and it needs to be turned on. The problem is rarely the wiring. 1) Test the receptacle with a second lamp or appliance. 2) Be sure that one half of the duplex receptacle (or the entire receptacle) isn't controlled by a switch in the room. 3) Check the circuit breaker (or fuse) for that receptacle's circuit to be sure it has not tripped (or blown). If it has, reset the breaker or replace the fuse, and try plugging a working lamp or appliance into the receptacle again. 4) If it still doesn't work, turn off the receptacle's circuit breaker, unscrew the cover plate from the receptacle, and use a voltage tester to be sure none of the wires in the electrical box are still "hot." Then check to be sure that the wires are securely fastened to the receptacle's terminals. 5) Look for signs of charring. Replace the receptacle if it looks damaged. 6) Put the cover plate back on, turn the circuit back on, and try the receptacle again. If it still doesn't work, turn the circuit back off, remove the receptacle cover, and replace the receptacle with one that has the same amp and voltage ratings. 7) If this doesn't solve the problem, call an electrician.

    Jan 18, 2006 | APC MasterSwitch Power Receptacle - Power...

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